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Appropriate guidelines of Waste Management for Keudchang Sub-district, Maetang District, Chiangmai province, Thailand Sawetrattanakul, S; Jansri, S. N.; Tantranont, N; Setthapun, W
AJARCDE (Asian Journal of Applied Research for Community Development and Empowerment) Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): Special Issue for Proceeding of International Conference on Sustainable Agricul
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy (SAFE-Network)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (369.637 KB) | DOI: 10.29165/ajarcde.v3i1.10

Abstract

Waste management is one of the major problems around the world. Governments and global organizations are starting to pay attention to the amount of waste left behind. Thai government drafted the National policies of waste management to manage waste in sustainable ways. Keudchang Sub-district confronts waste management problems due to the increase in the amount of waste, insufficient area for disposal, roadside and riverside litters, an illegal dump of rubbish in forests, and air pollution from waste incineration. The purposes of this research were to study the amount of waste and waste composition in 8 villages of Keudchang Community (KC), and develop appropriate guidelines of waste management. This participatory research collects data from both primary and secondary sources. Primary data sources include interviews and set up a public hearing stage with stakeholders in KC. Secondary data include a documentary of community context, meeting minutes, and other related documents. Qualitative data were analyzed with the content analysis method. The results showed that the KC produce an average of waste to 4,062.02 kg/day. These wastes could be classified into 4 types including organic waste (45.83%), recycle waste (28.01%), general waste (15.55%), and hazardous waste (10.60%) respectively. An individual person at KC produces an average of waste at 0.98 kg/day. Additionally, the results from conducting a public hearing stage of 8 villages revealed community awareness and solutions for waste management. All people in KC need to sort their wastes properly before disposal in 4 ways. First, organic waste. Each household needs to dig a hole and dump the organic wastes into it. The organic wastes should be managed and separated from other wastes. Second, recycle waste. Various approaches to recycle waste include waste credit bank (WCB), waste volunteer, monthly fee, and self-management. The WCB would be a hub for the communities to make profits and reduce landfill wastes. A waste volunteer would be a volunteer person who buys community wastes and sell them to outsiders. The monthly fee would be an approach where each household pays 70 baht/month to a garbage collector. Self-management would be another approach where households sort out, eliminate, sell, and manage wastes by themselves. Third, general waste. General waste could be divided into 2 groups as profitable waste and community dumping ground. Profitable waste could be sold to WCB or waste stores by each household. Community dumping ground would be an area allocated to all households for waste disposal. All households would not allow to throw garbage or wastes into other areas, but community dumping ground. Finally, hazardous waste. Hazardous waste would need to dispose of carefully in the trash can located at the office of the village headman. The findings from this study suggested setting up a waste management committee (WMC), as well as defining their roles and responsibilities. Local administrative organizations and community leaders also need to support, supervise, and control community waste management for resource-efficient and sustainable societies
Determinants of Chinese SMEs’ Entry to ASEAN Renewable Energy Market Luo, W; Jansri, S. N.; Rakwichian, W; Setthapun, W
AJARCDE (Asian Journal of Applied Research for Community Development and Empowerment) Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): Special Issue for Proceeding of International Conference on Sustainable Agricul
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy (SAFE-Network)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (269.115 KB) | DOI: 10.29165/ajarcde.v3i1.11

Abstract

ASEAN communities seek such resources as technologies and products from other countries to develop solar energy for sustainable development. In response to that, major renewable-utilization advanced countries including China has introduced funds, technology, and products into ASEAN. Despite the fact that China SMEs have a strong willingness to enter ASEAN solar energy market and ASEAN has demanded to develop the solar energy industry, only a few of them have succeeded in operation in the long-run. Introducing renewable energy technology and products from one place to another or bringing them from laboratory into community is not just a process of capital equipment supply from one firm to another but also includes the transfer of skills and know-how for operating and maintaining technology hardware, and knowledge for understanding this technology so that further independent innovation is possible by recipient. The purpose of this research was to determine the dynamic elements for China SMEs entering into the solar energy market of middle-income ASEAN member states. This participatory research collects data from both primary and secondary sources. Primary data sources include a questionnaire for 408 respondents of whom background across government officials, research personnel and industry, and interviews for 24 of them. Secondary data include reports from the Asian Development Bank, ASEAN Centre for Energy and other related documents from ASEAN governments. Data collected from the questionnaire were firstly analyzed through quantitative way: the value of Mean, Standard Error of Mean, Median, Standard Deviation (Std.) and Variance of each element were calculated. Information collected from interviews were then analyzed through the qualitative way. The results showed that policy environment, level of industrial and economic development, people’s willingness to cooperate, correct policy interpretation, capacity building and the presence of a third-party intermediary agency are the determinants of Chinese SME's successful entry to ASEAN renewable energy market. The mature policy environment of the ASEAN, need of industrial upgrading and sound economic development would facilitate the development of renewable energy industry, meanwhile, the strong willingness to cooperate, correct policy interpretation on preferential policies, well capacity building of both cooperative sides and the presence of a third-party intermediary agency would promote the cooperation between Chinese SMEs and relevant partners of ASEAN and the sustainable operation of Chinese SMEs in ASEAN.
The Combustion Characteristics of Biomass Stove with Preheated-Air by Porous Medium Laodee , P; Setthapun, W; Sawatdeenarunat, C
AJARCDE (Asian Journal of Applied Research for Community Development and Empowerment) Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): Special Issue for Proceeding of International Conference on Sustainable Agricul
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy (SAFE-Network)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (473.984 KB) | DOI: 10.29165/ajarcde.v3i1.13

Abstract

This study aims to characterize the combustion of the biomass stove filled with a porous medium for air pre-heating to enhance the biomass decomposition. An equivalence ratio, one of the important parameters for the combustion, was investigated to evaluate the completeness of the combustion process. Thermal efficiency was used as the indicator to reflect the performance of the biomass stove. Which was divided into two parts namely the pre-combustion (PCC) and the combustion chamber (CC). The CC volume was 28 liters for fuel storage, and it was insulated for reducing heat loss. The stove was made of 2 mm steel plate and the porous medium was a round-shape ceramic with a diameter of 10 mm. The boiling test was performed using corn cobs as a single solid fuel to boil water in the vessel. The temperature of the stove was measured using a thermocouple Type-K and a data recorder was used to collect the experimental data. The airflow rate was determined using an airflow meter and the fuel consumption rate was calculated using the aforementioned experimental data. Finally, the designed biomass stove will be demonstrated at the community to simultaneously enhance the community-scale energy and reduce the environmental issues.
The effect of space utilization under the ground-mounted solar farm on power generation Kumpanalaisatit , M; Jankasorn , A; Setthapun, W; Sintuya, H; Jansri, SN
AJARCDE (Asian Journal of Applied Research for Community Development and Empowerment) Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): Special Issue for Proceeding of International Conference on Sustainable Agricul
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy (SAFE-Network)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (249.975 KB) | DOI: 10.29165/ajarcde.v3i1.15

Abstract

The ground-mounted solar farms are the most common type of Thailand solar power plant. Presently, the area under the solar panels in Thailand had not been utilized. This work was to investigate a suitable configuration for space utilization under the PV panels which could promote power production. The effect of space utilization was investigated for 3 configurations: a water pond, chili cultivation, and a grass plantation. Under the first PV string, the pond sizing 2.4 × 15 meter was created. Under the 2nd PV string, 60 chilies samples were planted. Moreover, the grass was planted under the third string. The intensity of solar radiation (W/m2), temperature, voltage and current of solar panels were also monitoring. The impact of all configurations on the power generation was evaluated and compared with a control. Results indicated that the space utilization of the first string (the pond) and of the second string (the chili cultivation) generated electricity at 1.6 kW. Both configurations could generate more power than control. The pond and the vegetable plantation were suitable configurations for promoting power production.