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KEKERABATAN MAXOMYS SURIFER (MILLER 1900) ASAL SUMATRA, JAWA DAN KALIMANTAN BERDASARKAN VARIASI MORFOLOGINYA Maryanto, Ibnu; Sinaga, MH
BERITA BIOLOGI Vol 4, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Research Center for Biology-Indonesian Institute of Sciences

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14203/beritabiologi.v4i4.1270

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Examination of morphological variation on Maxomys surifer from Sumatra, Jawa and Kalimantan were conducted using 60 adult specimens.Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses of 20 skull and four external characters showed that Maxomys surifer was not sexually dimorphic (P >0.05). The discriminant analysis based on skull characters indicated that Sumatran population had two distinct group; north (Ketambe and Tapanuli) and South to Central Sumatra, the north of Sumatra form was closer to Kalimantan and Jawa.
TIKUS PADA TIPE HABITAT YANG BERBEDA Ibnu Maryanto; Agus P Kartono; Martua H Sinaga
BERITA BIOLOGI Vol 5, No 1 (2000)
Publisher : Research Center for Biology-Indonesian Institute of Sciences

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14203/beritabiologi.v5i1.1107

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MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION AND STATUS OF THE PLANTAIN SQUIRREL Callosciurus notatus (Boddaert, 1785) IN INDONESIA Maryanto, Ibnu; Maharadatunkamsi, Maharadatunkamsi; Suyanto, A.
TREUBIA Vol 32, No 1 (2002): Vol. 32 No. 1, August 2002
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v32i1.590

Abstract

The study of morphological variation of the plantain squirrel Callosciurusnotatus was done based on MZB (Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense) collections. A total of 160 adult specimens from Sumatra, Bangka, Serutu, Siantan-Anamba, Kalimantan, Jawa, Madura, Bali and Selayar Islands. Indonesia were examined. Thirty four skulls, dental and dentary characters were measured. Univariate and multivariate statisticalanalyses were applied to asses morphological variation.The results show that the population of plantain squirrel from Sumatra,Kalimantan and Jawa overlaps in discriminant function space indicating low variation in skull, dentary and dental size. The Maduran was suggested as an intermediate form between Kalimantan and Jawa; Bangka, Belitung, Batam cluster together with Sumatra; Natuna with Jawa; Serutu with Kalimantan; and Siantan appears to be betweenSumatra, Kalimantan and Jawa. There are two subspecies in Sumatera (C. n. vittatus and C. n. tapanulius) and one in Jawa (e. notatus notatus) and Kalimantan (C. n. dulitensis). The colour differences detected between populations within an island of Sumatra is not sufficient to justify that they subspecifically distinct within an island, except for the Tapanuli populations.Keyword: Squirrel, Callosciurus notatus, Morphology, Indonesia
COMPARISON OF ZOOGEOGRAPHY AMONG RATS, FRUIT BATS AND INSECTIVOROUS BATS ON INDONESIAN ISLANDS Maryanto, Ibnu; Higashi, Seigo
TREUBIA Vol 38 (2011): Vol. 38, December 2011
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1651.308 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v38i0.545

Abstract

The species number of rat, fruit bat, and insectivorous bat was signifi-cantly correlated with island size when five major islands of Irian, Borneo, Su-matra, Sulawesi and Java were included in the analysis, and the z area values were 0.22; 0.19 and, 0.26, respectively. When these islands were excluded, the correlation between species richness and island size was significant in fruit bats and insectivorous bats (R2=0.31, P<0.01) but not in rats. Z value declined to 0.07 in rats, 0.14 in fruit bats and 0.19 in insectivorous bats. Zoogeographic bounda-ries are shown. Wallace’s Line seems to be a zoogeographic boundary for all of three mammal groups; Bali and Lombok Islands belong to the cluster of Lesser Sunda in rats but not to the cluster of Greater Sunda in bats. Although Weber’s Line also seems to be a zoogeographic boundary for all of the three mammal groups, an effective boundary lies between Sulawesi and Maluku in rats and in-sectivorous bats but not between northern Maluku and Irian in fruit bats. The fauna of fruit bats in Southern Maluku is more similar to those of Irian. Lydek-ker’s line seems to be a boundary for only rats, though Biak, Owi and Yapen Islands belong to the cluster of Maluku. In addition to those boundaries, Cluster analyses revealed another boundary for rats between Sumatra and western Su-matra islands (Mentawai Islands) and between Lesser Sunda and Sulawesi to Southern Maluku for fruit and insectivorous bats.
MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF RATTUS PRAETOR (THOMAS, 1888) COMPLEX FROM PAPUA, WITH THE DESCRIPTION OF NEW SPECIES OF RATTUS FROM GAG ISLAND Maryanto, Ibnu; Sinaga, Martua H.; Achmadi, Anang S.; Maharadatunkamsi, Maharadatunkamsi
TREUBIA Vol 37 (2010): Vol. 37, December 2010
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (691.899 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v37i0.97

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Thirty specimens of Rattus collected from Gag Island, Papua were compareddirectly with two specimens from Gebe Island, one from Salawati Island and sixspecimens from mainland of Papua. All cranial, dental, dentary and external characterswere measured and analysed using multiple regression and discriminant function.The multiple regression showed that only incisive foramina length was influenced bysexual dimorphism. Discriminant function analysis indicated that the form from Gagisland was different from the other populations collected from mainland of Papua,Gebe and Salawati, and thus was described as Rattus nikenii sp. nov.
MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION IN THE EBONY AND SILVER LEAF MONKEYS [TRACHYPITHECUS AURATUS (E. GEOFFROY, 1812) AND TRACHYPITHECUS CRlSTATUS (RAFFLES, 1821)] FROM SOUTHEAST ASIA MARYANTO, IBNU; MANSJOER, I.; SAJUTHI, D.; SUPRlATNA, J.
TREUBIA Vol 31, No 2 (1997): Vol. 31 No. 2, December 1997
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (9082.567 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v31i2.615

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The morphological variation in the ebony and silver leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus auratus and T. cristatus) from Southeast Asia; Thailand, Malaya, Bintan, Sumatra, Serasan-Natuna, Kalimantan and Java were studied using multivariate analysis approaches. The results showed that clinal variation in skull; dental and dentary morphology was found in Java. The skull; dental and dentary characters showed an increase from West to East with Central Java as an intermediate fonn. Consequently, in Java there should be only one subspecies, T. a. auratus. Meanwhile, there are fourmorpholgical groups of Trachipithecus cristatus, those are of Thailand, Malaya-Sumatra-Kalimantan, Bintan and Natuna. The Malayan population, presumably is the same as Bintan population while Sumatra-Kalimantan forms an intermediate.
MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION OF THE THREE SPECIES FRUIT BAT GENUS MEGAEROPS FROM INDONESIA WITH ITS NEW DISTRIBUTION RECORD Maharadatunkamsi, Maharadatunkamsi; Maryanto, Ibnu
TREUBIA Vol 32, No 1 (2002): Vol. 32 No. 1, August 2002
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (9386.299 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v32i1.591

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Morphological variation in the fruit bat Megaerops spp. from five islands in Indonesia were examined. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses based on 19 skull characters and 12 external body chcracrers from 32 adult specimens were conducted to examine morphological variation.Multiple regression analysis on the three species examined indicated that there were not sexually dimorphic in both skull and external body characters. Between these species examined showed a marked distinction, as detected by using discriminant function analysis, Specimens of Megaerops from Bali and Lombok were not morphologically distinct from M. kusnotoi, while our additional Sumatran Megaerops were morphologically similar to M. w. albicollis.This is the first report of M. kusnotoi from Bali and Lombok, and for M. w.albicollis from Sumatra.Keywords: Taxonomic, morphology, distribution, Indonesia.
MAMMALS OF GAG ISLAND Maryanto, Ibnu; Kitchener, Darrell J.
TREUBIA Vol 31, No 3 (1999): Vol. 31 No. 3, December 1999
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v31i3.609

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Gag island, with 13 species of mammal recorded from a brief survey of only 10 days, has a relatively rich mammal fauna for its area (56 km2). This mammal assemblage was more influenced by faunal elements from nearby Irian Jaya and North Maluku than from elsewhere. More intensive surveys on Gag island will undoubtedly reveal further species of small microchiropteran bats. Habitats on the ultrabasic substrates were richer, more diverse and overall had a higher relative abundance of bats than those on the volcanics. The period of the survey and immediately preceding it was one of intense breeding activity for most, or all, of the bat species and for Rattus sp. The taxonomic status of two still to be identified mammals, a murid rodent Rattus sp. and the Tube - nosed Bat (Nyctimene sp.) on Gag island require further clarification.
INTRA SPECIFIC VARIATION OF THE SPOTTED-WINGED FRUIT BAT Balionycteris maculata (THOMAS, 1893) (CHIROPTERA, PTEROPODIDAE) FROM SUMATERA, .INDONESIA Maryanto, Ibnu
TREUBIA Vol 33, No 1 (2003): Vol. 33 No. 1, December 2003
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4977.61 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v33i1.586

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The spotted winged bat (Balionycteris maculala) is recorded for the first time in Sumatra, Indonesia. The morphoiogy of 13 specimens from Sumatra was compared with that of specimens from Durian (Riau Archipelago) and Kalimantan-lndonesia. Univariate and multivariate analyses show that the Sumatran population is both significantly smaller in a number of characters and some differences in shape occur between Sumatran and Kalimantan specimens. The Sumatran population is similar in morphology to that of Durian Island. The Sumatran and Durian island specimens are referred to as Balionycteris maculata seimundi.Key words: Fruit bat-Chiroptera-Pteropodidae, Balionycteris maculata, Indonesia, Sumatera
Arsitektur Rigi-rigi Dermatograf dari Marga Hylobates dan Symphalangus (Famili HYLOBATIDAE) di Indonesia Maryanto, Ibnu; Kartono, Agus Priyono; Putro, Gembong IR Sunarto
JURNAL BIOLOGI INDONESIA Vol 13, No 1 (2017): JURNAL BIOLOGI INDONESIA
Publisher : Perhimpunan Biologi Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1202.54 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/jbi.v13i1.3102

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ABSTRACTThe analysis of palm and sole arschitexture dermatographic traits have been done for two sub genera of Hylobates and Symphalangus in Indonesia. A dermatographical study was conducted to specimens from Indonesia Archipelago on genera Hylobates and Symphalangus, which are deposited in Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense-LIPI. A total of 101 specimens of Hylobates (78 specimens) and Symphalangus (23 specimens) were examined on palm and sole dermatographic traits. The discriminant canonical analyses showed that the Indonesian gibbon has two differences in function space of dermatograph types. By plotting these data, the percentage of the two groups that correctly classified was calculated to be 90.63%. Only nine specimens of Hylobates and Symphalangus were incorrectly classified, seven (9.5%) specimens Hylobates were classified as Symphalangus, and two specimens Symphalangus (9.1%) were classified as Hylobates. The majority of loops type dermatograph in this study indicated that the traits direction to ulnar, radial, and proximal between Hylobates and Symphalangus are significantly different (X2 >0.05, df=3; X2 = 13.58, 10.03 and 7.91 respectively).Keywords: Architecture Dermatographic, Hylobates, Symphalangus