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STUDENTS’ CHOICES ON TOPICS PUBLISHED IN PROJECT IBUNKA AND THEIR RATIONALES (A CASE STUDY ) Maolida, Elis Homsini; Mustika, Gilang
Jurnal JOEPALLT (Journal of English Pedagogy, Linguistics, Literature, and Teaching) Vol 6, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Universitas Suryakancana

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (206.576 KB) | DOI: 10.35194/jj.v6i2.408

Abstract

For novice writer, choosing a topic to write can be a difficult stage process since there are many factors to consider. The process of choosing topic and factors contribute to those choices are important to investigate since it can inform the writing teachers and lecturers about possible topics they may bring to the writing class. In addition, the students’ topic choices and their motives provide valuable information for writing teachers and lecturers to understand the students’ writing process, especially pre writing stage, which is very important to consider in teaching writing. This case study reveals students’ choice on topics and their rationales for choosing those topics. Fifteen English department students who took part in an online writing forum for more than twelve weeks, Project Ibunka, were observed and interviewed. The results show that campus activities and friendship were the top two topics chosen by students regarding school life. Meanwhile, entertainment and Events&Spots dominated students’ choice when they were asked to write about cultural topics. On the subject of social theme, majority of students chose educational issues for their topic. Various rationales of students topics choices were also discovered such as students’ interest on the topic, students’ consideration of audience and familiarity on the topic.
The Integration of Process-Genre Approach with Project Ibunka in an EFL Writing Class: Students’ Writing Ability Salsabila, Vinaaini; Maolida, Elis Homsini
Jurnal JOEPALLT (Journal of English Pedagogy, Linguistics, Literature, and Teaching) Vol 7, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Suryakancana

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (477.04 KB) | DOI: 10.35194/jj.v7i2.706

Abstract

Process-Genre is Process based approach synthesized with Genre based writing. Meanwhile, Project Ibunka is an online collaborative writing project in which the students from various cultures and countries interact to exchange the ideas in the form of essay writings. This study describes students’ writing ability as the result of the integration of process-genre approach with Project Ibunka in an EFL writing class. It is a case study that involves 46 university students who learn to compose English writing. This study reveals the increase of students’ writing ability indicated by students’ good control of schematic structure and recognition of grammatical features. However, the students face several obstacles in constructing good grammatical sentences.
THE INFLUENCE OF TEACHER’S INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ON VARIATIONS OF EXCHANGE PATTERNS IN AN EFL CLASSROOM Maolida, Elis Homsini
Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics Vol 3, No 1 (2013): Volume 3 No. 1 July 2013
Publisher : Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17509/ijal.v3i1.661

Abstract

Abstract: This study investigates how teacher’s instructional objectives influence the variations of exchange pattern between teacher and students in their classroom interaction. The present paper tries to find out the variations of exchange pattern in teacher-students interaction and to observe how the teacher’s instructional objectives influence those variations. The data were obtained from 90 minutes observation and recording of classroom interaction between a pre-service teacher and her students, interview with the teacher, and document analysis. The findings show that the use of exchange patterns in teacher-students interaction varied across learning activities. An exchange pattern dominates a learning activity more than the other. In this case, teacher’s instructional objectives provide contexts that guide the teacher to manage the interaction so expected exchanges occur in the class. In other words, the instructional objectives create instructional activities that determine certain exchange patterns to occur through certain methods and strategies. The objectives also influence teacher’s strategies in initiating the exchanges, for example in questioning strategies. The domination of non anomalous and synoptic pattern indicates that instructional objectives help the teacher in creating a relatively more manageable interaction in the class. However, it also indicates that the objectives, to certain extent, impede the teacher’s initiation in expanding the interaction. This study is expected to raise teachers’ awareness to improve their educational planning such as lesson plan and consider some possible negative effects of relying too much on lesson plans. It can also be a reflective description for researchers to put learning objectives into consideration when they analyze classroom interaction.Keywords: instructional objectives, exchange patterns, interaction, lesson plan.
The praxis of digital literacy in the EFL classroom: Digital-immigrant vs digital-native teacher Kurniawati, Nia; Maolida, Elis Homsini; Anjaniputra, Agung Ginanjar
Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics Vol 8, No 1 (2018): Vol. 8 No. 1, May 2018
Publisher : Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17509/ijal.v8i1.11459

Abstract

Myriads of theories account for the primacy of digital literacy on ELT as the demand of the 21st century, yet studies on digital media literacy of distinct English teacher generations are thin on the ground. Thus, this descriptive qualitative study investigated the utilization of digital literacy in the EFL classroom of senior high school teachers from two generations (digital immigrant and digital native) and their students’ responses to the use of digital media in the English classroom in Indonesia. Three instruments were utilized including classroom observations, questionnaires, and interviews. Following ACOT’s (Apple Classroom of Tomorrow) framework, the findings show that both teachers were at the adaptation stage in terms of digital literacy and this was reflected on the utilization of digital media in assisting students’ learning. Yet, the digital-immigrant teacher appeared to be practically more adept in the implementation of digital media. As for the second issue, the students responded positively to the use of digital technology by the teachers to make English class more fun and comprehensible. However, when it comes to an ideal teacher, the students still considered good characters as the main criteria for an ideal teacher. Technology does support teachers in delivering the materials, but the way they behave and treat the students still also plays crucial part in maintaining a good relationship between teachers and students. The results show that the English teachers need to develop their digital literacy to keep up with the current demand to be professional English teachers in the digital era.
Go hand in hand: Showcasing lecturers’ online collaborative teaching practices Maolida, Elis Homsini; Sofarini, Anisa
Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics Vol 11, No 3 (2022): Vol. 11, No. 3, January 2022
Publisher : Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17509/ijal.v11i3.38533

Abstract

Collaborative teaching has been performed by special educators in K-12 schools for decades, and myriads of studies have witnessed its promising impacts on both students and teachers. Notwithstanding its vogue, only a few studies have primarily dealt with its implementation in higher education. Furthermore, empirical attempts accentuating lecturers’ stepwise practices during collaborative teaching implementation remain under-explored, especially when the practices are undertaken online. This study, henceforth, intends to fill the void. In total, the experiences of two collaborating lecturers, leading Teaching English for Foreign Language (TEFL) and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) course, were scrutinized. Their practices were documented for 20 weeks and their views were also assembled to grasp how they perceived their online co-teaching practices. In addition, the views from six representative students were assembled at the end of the term through focused group discussion. Through Joint Practice Development (JPD) framework, lecturers’ online collaborative teaching practices were captured and conceptually grouped into five developed stages – collaborative planning, collaborative instruction, peer feedback and evaluation, follow up, and refinement stage. Admitting lecturers’ online co-teaching approach, students contended that its implementation was opportune in bridging their needs of pedagogical knowledge and related technology, facilitating learning efficiency, and fostering their collaboration awareness. Albeit its effectiveness, students are also concerned with collaboration appearance clarity, learning proficiency, and autonomy. Thus far, this teaching approach is worthy of continuing in the higher education, with clear format to adopt.
RELATING TEACHER’S ORAL CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK TO YOUNG LEARNERS’ UPTAKE: A CASE STUDY IN A YOUNG LEARNER EFL CLASSROOM Elis Homsini Maolida
Indonesian EFL Journal Vol 3, No 2 (2017)
Publisher : University of Kuningan

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25134/ieflj.v3i2.665

Abstract

This study explores various types of oral corrective feedback in relation to learners’ uptake in a young learner EFL classroom in Indonesia. It employed a qualitative research design embracing the characteristics of a case study. The data were mainly collected from 540 minutes video recording and observation to capture types of teacher’s oral corrective feedback and learners’ uptake in the classroom interaction. Teacher’s lesson plans were also analyzed to look at possible contribution on teacher’s choice of corrective feedback and learners’ uptake. The first finding reveals that the teacher employed seven types of oral corrective feedback; recast, elicitation, clarification request, explicit correction, repetition, metalinguistic feedback, and paralinguistic signal. As result, the students responded by various types of uptake such as repair and need repair. The distribution of learners’ uptake following different types of oral corrective feedback shows that output prompting feedback strategies tend to be more successful in encouraging learners’ uptake than input provided by feedback strategies. It is also noteworthy that elicitation and repetition led to be the highest number of repair. The fact that input providing feedback strategies result in fewer uptakes, however, tends to be resulted from the teacher’s choice to continue the topic in a certain context which shows the influence of learning contexts and teacher’s objectives on the choice of teacher’s corrective feedback and the occurrence of uptake.Keywords: oral corrective feedback, learners’ uptake, young learner
INTEGRATING PROCESS-GENRE APPROACH WITH PROJECT IBUNKA TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ ENGLISH WRITING Elis Homsini Maolida; Vina Aini Salsabila
English Review: Journal of English Education Vol 8, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : University of Kuningan

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25134/erjee.v8i1.2057

Abstract

This study goes into how an integration of process-genre approach and project ibunka improves students’ English writing. Through Process-Genre approach, students put in writing essays by combining Process and Genre based writing. Meanwhile, Project Ibunka as an online collaborative writing project is deployed as a means of publishing the students’ writing to be read and commented by other students from various cultures and countries. In the context of this study, Ibunka also provides sources used to explore the topic and as a writing model. This study is a classroom action research that involved 46 university students in two classes who learned to compose English essays in three learning cycles within twelve meetings. The integration of Process-Genre and Project Ibunka is implemented in four stages: introducing and exploring theme and topics of writing, modeling and determining genre, joint writing and independent writing. In joint and independent writing, the students go through several stages of writing process such as planning, drafting, writing, revising and editing. The result of essays scoring shows average score improvement in both classes from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and cycle 3. This students’ writing improvement is also confirmed by students’ positive responses revealed from observation, questionnaire and students interview.
TEACHING PRACTICUM OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS IN EFL CLASSROOMS: QUESTIONING TYPES AND PURPOSES Milma Vinca Cantikka Hidayat; Siti Nurjanah; Elis Homsini Maolida
TLEMC (Teaching and Learning English in Multicultural Contexts) Vol 4, No 1 (2020): Teaching and Learning English in Multicultural Contexts
Publisher : Siliwangi University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.37058/tlemc.v4i1.1781

Abstract

In order to potentially support the students to master the language, the teachers can give questions to stimulate them. This study explores types of questions used by three pre-service teachers and their frequency as well as the teachers’ purposes by looking at the contexts in which they used the questions. Theory of Cotton (1988) was used to analyse the data which categorized questions into three major types namely yes/no questions, open closed question, and display referential question. Employing descriptive qualitative approach, the data were taken from video transcriptions that were analysed and categorized into their question category. The participants were three pre-service teachers who practiced in three different senior high schools. The result showed that the total of 128 data consists of 14 opened referential questions, 81 questions belonged to closed display questions, and 33 data belonged to yes/no questions. Therefore, it can be concluded that the most frequently used type of question is closed display questions. From the result of observation focusing on the contexts and situations when the teachers gave the questions, it was revealed that the purposes of the open and referential questions were more to stimulate students in stating information and pursuing knowledge on their own and ask students’ opinion, reason, or judgement. Whereas, the purposes of closed and display questions were likely to make the students focused and to check students’ knowledge and understanding. Lastly, the yes/no questions’ purposes were making the students focus and attracting students’ activeness.
Students’ Writing Process for Project Ibunka: A Case Study of EFL Writers Elis Homsini Maolida; Gilang Mustika
Journal of English Language Teaching and Linguistics Journal of English Language Teaching and Linguistics, 3(3), December 2018
Publisher : Yayasan Visi Intan Permata

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (475.297 KB) | DOI: 10.21462/jeltl.v3i3.147

Abstract

Project Ibunka is an online cross-cultural exchange program that has a text-based bulletin board discussion where the students from various cultures can write about several topics from school life to social issues and give comments to each other. In the context of this study, this program was used  as a media to develop students’ writing skill. This study aims to reveal the students’ writing process in the Project. This case study involved 15 English department students who took part in the project for more than twelve weeks. The data were collected through observation and interview and they were analyzed qualitatively. The findings reveal that most students experienced all stages of writing process from pre writing, drafting, revising, editting and publishing. However, the arrangement, the way the students put the stages into practice and how they applied their strategies in each stage were various. In pre writing, for example, the students experienced different mixture of conversation, silent thinking, reading some sources, clustering, and outlining strategies. In drafting, most students focused on writing their ideas and avoided losing the ideas by mixing the language while the others did revision and editting during drafting process. In revising and editting, the students asked for feedback and utilized technologies to help them improve their writing. Eventhough all students published their writing in Project Ibunka, each student had different experience of publishing process. It shows that all writers have their own way and strategy that work for them and what works for a writer may not work for another and vice versa.
PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS’ TALK IN VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL: A CLASSROOM INTERACTION ANALYSIS Elis Homsini Maolida; Fuzi Fauziyah; Siti Gina Meilani; Susi Sulastri
Jurnal JOEPALLT (Journal of English Pedagogy, Linguistics, Literature, and Teaching) Vol 8, No 2 (2020)
Publisher : Universitas Suryakancana

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (471.759 KB) | DOI: 10.35194/jj.v8i2.1007

Abstract

In teaching and learning process there is an interaction between teacher and students known as classroom interaction. Classroom interaction can be broken down into two: teacher’s talk and student’s talk. However, in many classes it is common that teacher’s talk is more dominant than students’ talk. Deploying descriptive qualitative study,  this paper aimed to find out types of pre-service teacher’s talk in vocational high school classroom interactions, and to find out the type that most frequently used in that classroom interaction. The data were obtained from transcripts of the teaching video from three English pre-service teachers. The data were then analyzed and categorized by using framework of teachers’ talk proposed by Flanders (1970) namely Flanders Interaction Analysis Categories (FIAC). The result of this study shows that all categories of teachers’ talk occurred in the pre-service teacher classroom interaction with varied percentage of occurrence, such as Asks Question 53%, Accepts Feeling 3%, Praises or Encourages 7%, Accepts or Uses Ideas of Student 6%, Lecturers 9%, Gives Direction 18%, and Criticizes or Justifies Authority 4%. From the data, it can be seen that Asking Question is the category occurred the most in the classrooms which shows the pre-service teachers’ preference on using questions in their classroom interaction.Keywords: English class, classroom interaction, pre-service teacher, teacher’s talk, Flanders Interaction Analysis Categories (FIAC)