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Al-Albab
ISSN : 02166143     EISSN : 25028340     DOI : -
Core Subject : Social,
Al-Albab ISSN 0216-6143 (print) and ISSN: 2502-8340 (online) is an interdisciplinary journal published twice a year in print and online (e-journal) by the Pontianak State Institute of Islamic Studies, Pontianak. The journal was offline and started to be online in 2012. The e-ISSN was issued in 2016. Review processing started to be online in 2016 by using available tolls provided by the OJS. Reviewers may choose to use Review Form provided by the OJS or doing review process on the manuscript using Tracking Changes menu provided by Microsoft Word.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 4, No 2 (2015)" : 10 Documents clear
He Dynamics of Relation between the State and Local Religions in Indonesia: Between Idealism and Reality Ahmad, Alif Al Hilal; Arifianto, Muhammad Lukman; Zainurrakhmah, Zainurrakhmah; Fasya, Adib ‘Aunillah
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1845.522 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.292

Abstract

This paper, in general, discusses the relation between the state and local religions in Indonesia. There is no doubt that Indonesia is one of the countries which has local religions or beliefs with a considerable number of followers, so that the state needs to protect of the followers of these religions. However, after the passing of the government regulation on the recognition of particular official religions in the country, various issues related to formally unrecognized religions began to emerge, including discrimination by the government, especially in administrative matters, as well as social discrimination by the community that denies their existence. Various methods are used by the state to minimize the discriminatory attitudes by issuing multiple regulations and policies, but still it is not considered satisfactory to satisfy all parties, especially those who have been discriminated.
Struggle for New Media of Peace and Tolerance: A Close Look To the Usage of Internet in Defining and Building Young Muslim Community in Indonesia Ridwan, Imam Malik
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1907.771 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.288

Abstract

As for religion, internet has become a very important aspect in people’s everyday live, especially for those who seek information and further understanding about religion; internet is a way in and out to do so. While in one side internet has been a great help in providing sources and opportunity to learn religion in a new way, it also has a negative potential for the growing numbers of radicalism and religious extremism. Various researches and studies have bought up large data showing that these negative effects of internet bring bad influences to religious believers. Nevertheless, the ability of internet in providing and spreading information are also a way out in bringing back religion to its ideal path, that is to evoke peace and welfare among people. Internet is then used as a field for dakwah (proselytizing) to spread more peaceful as well as relevant information on religion and its related topics. Online dakwah is therefore meant to initiate peace and non-violent ways in understanding and practicing religion in real life. Focused targets for the dakwah are youth as the most active users of internet, as well as government to initiate and implement such policies to keep internet clean from violence and extremism.
The Role Of Chinese Social Organization In The Community Of Singkawang City Hidayat et al., Samsul; Suhardiman, Reviewed by:
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1815.565 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.293

Abstract

Singkawang is one of the municipalities and part of the Sambas district, second largest after the city of Pontianak in West Kalimantan. Based on the historical records presented in this book, at the end of the 18th century, 40,000 Chinese people mostly of Hakka surnames from Fujian and Guangdong areas migrated to West Kalimantan. They worked as gold miners and paid taxes to the Kingdom of Sambas, until they set up their own kongsi (clan association) as a confederation, where every partnership or association had its own territory, leaders, regulations and legislation as well as law enforcement and regular army. Singkawang city at the time served as a settlement or a village for Chinese immigrants, and here people conducted trading activities, such as selling daily staples, farming and working in the mines. Trading activities in Singkawang were also closely associated with the gold mining business, so Singkawang served as a port for trade.
Religion, Culture and Local Wisdom in the Death Ritual of Pontianak Malay Society Prasojo, Zaenuddin Hudi; Djar’ie, Sumarman Muhammad
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1894.779 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.289

Abstract

Death is inevitable and will occur to every living creature, including humans no mater what religion or belief they have; however, no one knows for sure when it happens. Humans can only predict death based on indicators that can be seen before it occurs. Still until now, there are many people who attempt to oppose death, even though in the end they have to admit that Allah is the Almighty. Therefore, no wonder if the death is still considered a tragedy rather than the culmination of happiness when humans finally harvest of deeds they have done all their life. In this light, death rituals are often accompanied by the tears of the family of the deceased, even some cry hard to express their pain as someone they love is gone, coupled with the arrival of relatives and acquaintances who mourn, and condolences as well as the phrase “inna lillâh wa inna ilaihi raji’ȗn”. A day of joy has turned into a day of sorrow, although it always ends with kendurian (gathering for remembering the dead), whose excitement is like that of selamatan (communal feast) and syukuran (celebration of thankfulness). This paper tries to present the infiltration of religion and culture in the death ritual in Pontianak Malay community as an object of discussion of local wisdom by using mafhȗm mukhâlafah approach, to provide a new understanding of the meaning of death.
Polemic On Church Construction in Jakarta at all., Ihsan Ali-Fauzi; Syamsul Kurniawan, Reviewed by:
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1819.846 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.294

Abstract

Embracing religion and performing worship in accordance with one’s own preference is the right of each citizen, and is guaranteed by law. However, the ugly truth is that the Indonesian society’s tolerance is relatively low, especially in addressing the beliefs or religious differences that become an issue in the fulfillment of those rights. As a result, religious reasons often become the cause of conflicts at the grassroots level. For example, in the construction of churches, as described in the book entitled Kontroversi Gereja di Jakarta (Church Controversy in Jakarta), which was written by the research team of Paramadina Foundation, Master’s program of Peace and Conflict Resolution of Gadjah Mada University (MPRK UGM) and the Indonesian Conference on Religion and Peace (ICRP), where in the case of Jakarta, the construction of churches also often causes polemic.
Demazhabization of Islam, Divinity Economy and Narratives of Conflict of the Tablighi Followers in Samarinda East Kalimantan Hamdi, Saipul
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (530.161 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.285

Abstract

Tablighi Jamaat is one of the world’s largest and most successful transnational Islamic movements with established branches built on the business of dakwa (proselytization) in approximately 180 countries. Tablighi’s strong commitment to a style of dakwa based on their reformist attitude and flexible practice of mazhab (schools of thought) through a process of ‘demazhabizasi’ (demahzhabization), has attracted interest from a range of people. Tablighi guarantees the freedom for its members to embrace their choice of mazhab, and prefers its proselytizers to follow the mazhab of the communities in which they preach in order to avoid religious debates. This article aims to understand the concept of ‘demazhabisasi’ that has developed in Tablihgi and the ways in which Tablighi members work to overcome and prevent conflict due to the different understandings of each mazhab. The material sacrifices Tablighi proselytizers make together with their reliance on and submission to God for their economy, has led this research to examine the concept of a ‘divine economy’ that has developed in Tablighi communities. Yet, behind Tablighi’s apparent success, conflict has emerged internally among Tablighi members, as well as externally among locals in the communities in which Tablighi proselytizers work. This research uses an ethnographic approach to explore narratives of conflict that have emerged as a result of Tablighi proselytizing practices in Samarinda, East Kalimantan.
Islam and Tradition in Nanga Jajang: Social and Religious Practices Of the Malay Community MS, Ibrahim
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1859.892 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.290

Abstract

Islam basically brings noble values in managing human relationship with God (hablumminallah). With these noble values, Islam teaches the way for humans to worship God. Meanwhile, traditions which are the rituals and customs of a society, is also an attempt to build a relationship with something other than human. Therefore, it is clear that Islam and traditions that are present in people’s behavior also bring certain values that are different from each other. In the Malay community of Nanga Jajang, Islam as a religion and religious rituals are inseparable from the traditional rituals. In fact, there are no clear boundaries between traditions and religious rituals in practice, as seen in ma`syiral jum`atan, acara begunting rambut (hair cutting ceremony), sunatan (circumcision), barobat kampung (traditional healing), etc. In social traditions, religion practices also run simultaneously such as reading the Qur’an and shalawat to the prophet. On the other hand, religious practices are also incorporated into elements of local traditions such as the hair cutting ceremony for infants, circumcision, etc., with a set of materials that are also found in social traditions. Similarly, the prayer used in the traditional healing appears to have the process of completion, even accommodation of Islamic values and traditions in the practice of the life the Malay community in Nanga Jajang.
Intrigues behind the Harem Wall: Social, Cultural and Political Construction of Life behind the Harem of Sultan Sulaiman I Ar., Eka Hendry
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.039 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.286

Abstract

The urgency of exploring the history of the harem is important, not only because of being a rare phenomenon today or no longer in existence but perhaps this work is like opening the pandora’s box, a nightmare for women. This paper is presented as an academic review to portrait the fact that power is always in contact with wealth and attractive women, especially during a period when patriarchy was dominant. Sultan Sulaiman I was in power between 1520 to 1566 AD, in the 16th century AD. In western literature, Sultan Sulaiman was known as Suleyman the Magnificent. The work concludes, first, that the harem to the people of the Middle East in the medieval times was considered respectable for the family, especially for women both in the context of the imperial and domestic harem, where it was constructed in the name of honor, comfort and safety for women. Second, the construction of social, cultural and religious institutions of harem is the integration between the will to protect and maintain the honor of women, the concept of marriage in Islam and the patriarchal system hegemony in the Islamic world particularly in the context of the imperial harem. Third, the role of Sulaiman I who was “brave” to go against the tradition that had been practiced for many years in the Ottoman Empire, a milestone was important for the emancipation of women of the harem. Finally, to respond to the harem tradition, we must be in an impartial position, between the construction of the West and East.
Dynamic Social Integration: Social Integration of Religious Followers in Ambon Ernas, Saidin
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1945.457 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.291

Abstract

The social dynamics in post-conflict Ambon, Maluku, 1999-2004, indicated that even though people were segregated in the Islamic-Christian areas, gradually social integration began to occur naturally. The process of integration that occurred also gave birth to new values and inclusive views that give hope to future peace building. Using the theory of social integration of dynamic adaptation of the Parsonian structural-functional classic paradigm and combined with a qualitative research model, this study successfully formulated several important findings. First, social integration occurred in the city of Ambon could run naturally through economic interactions, consensus on political balance and inclusive religious spirit. In addition, the presence of public spaces such as offices, schools, malls and coffee shops served as a natural integration medium that is increasingly important in the dynamics of the society. Second, the new social integration has created an increasingly important meaning that leads to a model of active harmony characterized by a process of the increasingly active social interaction between different religions, as well as strengthening pluralism and multiculturalism insight due to campaign by educational institutions and civil society groups. Third, this study also reminds us that although there has been a process of the increasingly positive social integration in Ambon city, people still need to be aware of the growth of radical religious ideologies at a certain level, and also of strengthening identity politics in the long run that will potentially give birth to primordial and ethnocentric attitudes that are harmful to the development of peace.
Crusade and Its Effect on the East and the West Sahide, Ahmad
Al-Albab Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (81.297 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v4i2.287

Abstract

The Crusade is an important part of the history of Islamic thought, development, culture and civilization. The Crusade which changed the path of human historical development, especially of the Islamic world, had a major influence on the encounter between the West and the East (the Islamic world) today. By understanding the history, the Crusade, we can find the correlation of the hegemony of the Western countries, especially between the United States and the Islamic world today, especially in the Middle the East region. the Western presence in all aspects of life of the contemporary Islamic world, which is far left behind, has historical relevance of the Crusade. This paper seeks to review the Crusade and its influence on the development of the contemporary Islamic world and the West.

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