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Al-Albab
ISSN : 02166143     EISSN : 25028340     DOI : -
Core Subject : Social,
Al-Albab ISSN 0216-6143 (print) and ISSN: 2502-8340 (online) is an interdisciplinary journal published twice a year in print and online (e-journal) by the Pontianak State Institute of Islamic Studies, Pontianak. The journal was offline and started to be online in 2012. The e-ISSN was issued in 2016. Review processing started to be online in 2016 by using available tolls provided by the OJS. Reviewers may choose to use Review Form provided by the OJS or doing review process on the manuscript using Tracking Changes menu provided by Microsoft Word.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 7, No 1 (2018)" : 9 Documents clear
Religious Conflicts: Opportunity Structures, Group Dynamics, and Framing Lindgren, Tomas
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.236 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.961

Abstract

Explanations of violent religious conflicts usually focus on preconditions, facilitator causes or precipitating events at micro, meso or macro levels of analysis. As social psychology is the scientific study of the ways in which thoughts, feelings, perceptions, motives, and behaviors are influenced by interactions and transactions between groups and individuals, it can increase our understanding of the dynamics of religious conflicts at micro and meso levels. In this paper, I illustrate this point with a discussion of the utility of social movement theory for understanding the dynamics of religious conflicts. Social movement theory locates religious conflicts within broader contexts and complex processes by focusing on the interplay between micro and meso factors and the ways in which people perceive macro factors. Given certain conditions, religion can and often do contribute to collective violence. Religion is rarely, if ever, the main cause of intergroup conflicts, but is often used as an instrument for the mobilization of human and non-human resources. Appeal to religion may help conflicting parties overcome the collective action problem associated with intergroup conflicts. This does not necessarily mean that religious conflicts have unique characteristics or a logic of their own that sets them apart from other types of intergroup conflicts.
Mulai Lawan Bismillah: Religiosity of the Banjar People in the Banjar Songs Composed by Anang Ardiansyah Nasrullah, Nasrullah
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (168.852 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.987

Abstract

Local folk songs are often only enjoyed by local people and, of course, only a few of these songs can become national songs. However, through the song called Paris Barantai composed by Anang Ardiansyah, the Banjar song can become a nationally recognized regional folk song. In addition, Anang Ardiansyah‘s other songs have a message or religious content that reflects the Islamic culture of the Banjar community. Therefore, this paper explores religious content of four songs composed by Anang Ardiansyah with the aim that the local folk songs are not only sung but reinforce the distribution of religious values and knowledge in relation to the Banjar culture. The results of this paper describe the religious practice of urang (people of) Banjar related to faith, prayer and shalawat in everyday life and the term haram menyarah (surrender is forbidden) as Banjar people's struggle doctrine depicted from the Banjar song composed by Anang Ardiansyah. Therefore, through these songs it becomes an important part of the efforts to strengthen the Banjar religious identity and religious value distribution will take place continuously.
Dayak and Malay Brotherhood in the Malay Collective Memory of Post-Independence Indonesia Hermansyah, Hermansyah
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (291.014 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.934

Abstract

Each community in the world has a past in which their existence is commonly determined by things happening in their past. To preserve their past a community needs means of transmission, among others, through oral traditions such as stories, mantra, and way of life. They inherit stories, mantra, and ways of life with values that have related meanings to their life. The heritage of these things is very important to preserve and develop the collective identity of the community. As they continue to be passed down, they become the collective memory of a community. The West Kalimantan Malay society has collective memories that are relatively inherited in the form of oral traditions and other life practices such as cultivation. Part of the collective memory has awakened them to the brotherhood with the people called Dayak today. Nevertheless, the collective memory is confronted with challenges both coming from within themselves and from the outside that may eliminate them without a better replacement.
Religious Violence in the Indonesian Democratic Era J., Hasse; Hidayati, Mega
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (231.892 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.935

Abstract

The Indonesian democratic era has provided hope for the growth of mutual social practices established upon diversity of ethnicity, religions, race, and inter-group relations. Yet, in the last decade, various forms of violence were often carried out on behalf of religion instead. These acts of violence were not only physical but also psychological (cultural), in the forms of discrimination, abuse, expulsion, insult, and threat. The Ahmadiyya and Shia cases, for instance, provide an outlook regarding the prevalence of violence within social practices in the community in response to differences. Why does such violence remain to occur in Indonesia?  The work finds that, aside from a ‘failed understanding of religious texts’, excessive truth claim also triggers acts of religious violence in the current era of Indonesian democracy. It is of utmost importance that people’s understanding and interpretation of differences be set straight so that any response to differences can be considered as an embryo of national power that serves as an instrument employed for uniting the people of this nation instead of disuniting them. It is also strongly indicated by the work that religious violence may be avoided by changing the understanding of the meaning of differences.
The Involvement of Religious Leaders in Conflict Resolution within Tolaki People of Konawe District Koodoh, Erens Elvianus; Ahimsa Putra, Heddy Shri; Setiadi, Setiadi
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.141 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.965

Abstract

This study aims to identify the various socio-cultural conditions of Tolaki people in Konawe that often engaging in inter-family conflict. The process of identifying the socio-cultural conditions leads to find the correlation between socio-cultural conditions and the types of inter-family conflicts and how they get resolved at the community level. Religious leaders are part of the efforts of solving the conflicts. In addition, this study is also aimed to determine and analyze the types of inter-family conflicts that exist and the processes for conflict resolution among families in the Tolaki in Konawe. The research data is based on two categories of informant; traditional leaders and ordinary informants that are public figures such as religious leaders, government officials within the scope of sub-district, village, and community members both at the level of individuals, families, and communities. The traditional leaders get involved in conflict resolution while public figures have experience on dealing with such conflicts and are sometime involved in a conflict. The work indicates that the conflicts in the Tolaki people take the form of closed and open conflicts. While the sources or the causes of the conflict come from tulura (speech), peowai (actions), and powaihako (behavior). The sources of the conflict then are manifested in the daily life of Tolaki people and become sisala'aineperapua (conflict in marriage), sisala'aine hapo-hapo (conflict by treasure), and conflict in social relations. Social and cultural conditions that often lead to inter-family conflicts are the difference in social strata, economic inequality, and religious differences. Tolaki People then settle their conflict through the expertise and charisma of religious and cultural leaders by the completion of melanggahako, mesokei, peohala, mombopoo'rai, sombalabu, and mosehe.
Christian Torajan Youth in Perceiving Aluk To Dolo Gayatri, Erin
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (141.67 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.985

Abstract

The fascinating influence of world religion has given important impact to the existence of indigenous religion such as Aluk To Dolo within the life of the Christian Torajan Youth who live in Yogyakarta. Aluk To Dolo as one of indigenous religions in Indonesia, in fact, is almost in the position of weak as its followers are decreasing in its region of origin, Tanah Toraja of Sulawesi. It is found that only one leader is still remaining in Toraja accompanied by the practice of Rambu Solo which is also still being maintained in the region. This work is based on the view of the youth toward Alok To Dolo as the youth play an important role to determine and negotiate the inheritance of their religion including indigenous religion within their life. This article examines how Christian Torajan Youth perceive Christianity and Aluk To Dolo. Data collection is conducted through depth interview and focused group discussion with a group of Christian Torajan Youth members who stay in Yogyakarta for their studies. They are affiliated to Torajan student organizations and Torajan tribal church in Yogyakarta. This work concludes that Torajan students perceive the Aluk To Dolo as pendamping agama or the companion of religion they practice (Christianity) besides perceiving it as their cultural home base. In other words, they mean the Aluk To Dolo for cultural practices supporting their Christianity practice in their life. It is also found that the decreasing of the practice of Alok To Dolo by the students is more caused by three factors including the distance to the origin land, the influence from the Toraja tribal church, and the literatures having influence in their believe. As student, although the Christian Torajan youth are close and more influenced by literatures in Christianity (church), they also practice the teachings of the local religion to keep their cultural identity.
Heterogeneous Islam as a Cultural Identity of Multicultural ­Communities in the Suburbs of Pontianak Yusriadi, Yusriadi; Muttaqin, Imron
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.669 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.1094

Abstract

This article discusses the variant of Islam that lives in a multicultural society in the Sungai Ambawang area in the suburbs of Pontianak City, West Kalimantan. In the Javanese, Bugis, Malay and Madurese communities, Islam has served as an important element in the formation of their cultural identity, thus causing them to be synonymous with the Islamic community. Islamic elements that are used and have become part of the culture of society include the choice of Islamic dates such as the Hijri month in determining the time of cultural activities, the use of Al-fitihah and several other verses from the Qur’an as well as shalawat and prayer, the use of mosques as a center of cultural activities and the involvement of Islamic religious leaders in traditional ceremonies. The use of these elements has become a hallmark of the community culture and its form has been preserved until today.
Religious-Based Higher Education Institution and Human Resource Development: A Case Study of Universitas Pesantren Tinggi Darul Ulum Jombang (UNIBDU) maarif, samsul
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (90.022 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.962

Abstract

The role of higher education is very crucial in developing human resource because it is a future investment which has great effect on the improvement of real sector. Higher education is proven to be an effective agent of social change. In human resource management, the role of higher education is embodied in community service program which is more known as “Tri Dharma Perguruan Tinggi” including acquisition, transmission and application. Human Resource management is basic administrative description or educational management based on a series of interrelated processes in guiding the behavior of individuals as the member of an organization in order to achieve its goals. The process can be identified as follows: planning, compensation, recruitment, selection, induction, appraisal, development, maintenance, performance, security, integration, and information.
Practicing Ihsan with Tasawuf Amaliyah Fuad, Ahmad Masfuful
Al-Albab Vol 7, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Graduate Program of Pontianak Institute of Islamic Studies

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1909.576 KB) | DOI: 10.24260/alalbab.v7i1.959

Abstract

Moch. Djamaluddin Ahmad, Tasawuf Amaliyah, Jombang: Februari, 2018Practicing Ihsan with Tasawuf AmaliyahAs Islam is spread out by the Prophet of Muhammad (Peace be Upon Him: PbUH) for the seeks of becoming the blessing for the universe (raḥmatan lil ‘ālamīn), Islam offers three main pillars namely iman, islam, and ihsan. The first pillar of iman consisting of its principles (rukun) is the manifestation of the belief of a believer which is known as theology (akidah). The second pillar of Islam together with its five principles is the manifestation of the practice of Islamic teaching (syariat). And the third pillar of ikhsan is the essence of the practicing of the values of Allah the almighty God and the values of the worshipers as later known as hakikat. 

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