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Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015" : 8 Documents clear
Chemical Pretreatment and Enzymatic Saccharification of Seaweed Solid Wastes Pujoyuwono Martosuyono; Andi Hakim; Yusro Nuri Fawzya
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.130

Abstract

The technical feasibility of seaweed waste utilization as a resource of renewable energy was investigated in this paper. The production of fermentable sugars from seaweed waste was studied by dilute sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide pretreatment and further enzymatic hydrolysis. Pretreatment was conducted by using 1.0 and 2.0% dilute sulfuric acid w/v and 4 and 5% sodium hydroxide w/v for 30 min at 121 oC. Pretreated seaweed wastes were analyzed by X­Ray Diffraction (XRD) to examine the crystallinity index of the cellulose and observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to examine the changes in structure of cellulose fiber. Saccharification of pretreated seaweed waste was carried out using crude cellulase enzyme provided by Pulp and Paper Research Center in Bandung. Saccharification was done in shake flask with 20% of substrate in citrate phosphate buffer at 30 oC and 50 oC, agitation of 150 rpm in shaking incubator for 48 h. Samples were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h for further analysis. Enzyme concentrations were varied between 10­50 U/g dry samples. The results showed that dilute acid and base pretreatment of seaweed solid waste can be used to improve the digestibility of seaweed waste. It successfully acted by reducing the lignin content and degrading the structure of cellulose from crystalline into amorphous form which is more susceptible to the enzyme action.The optimum pretreatment condition was shown by 4% NaOH at 121 oC for 30 min, producing the most fermentable sugar concentration. Sugar concentration produced by saccharification was optimum at 50 oC, enzyme concentration of 50 U/g sample for 24 h base pretreatment. The results of the experiment were expected to contribute in the process development of bioconversion of lignocellulosic materials into renewable energy sources. 
Effect of Agitation Speed and Cultivation Time on the Production of the Emestrin Produced by Emericella nidulans Marine Fungal muhammad nursid nursid; Martua Manulang; Joko Samiadji; Endar Marraskuranto
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.122

Abstract

Emestrin, an epipolythidioxopiperazine (EPT), is bioactive secondary metabolite produced by the marine fungus Emericella nidulans. Emestrin is potential to be developed as anticancer agent. Our present study investigated the effect of the agitation speed and cultivation time on the production of the mycelial biomass and emestrin in E. nidulans. The fungal was cultivated in malt extract broth (MEB) medium with varying agitation speeds of 0, 50, 100,150 rpm during 1,2,3 and 4 weeks of incubation at the temperature of 28 oC. Concentration of emestrin was determined by using high performed liquid chromatography (HPLC). The highest concentration of emestrin was found at static condition (0 rpm) cultivated for 1 week.
Front Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 2 Tahun 2015 Squalen Bulletin
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.333

Abstract

Purification and Characterization of Fucoidan from the Brown Seaweed Sargassum binderi Sonder ellya sinurat; Rosmawaty Peranginangin; Endang Saepudin
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.133

Abstract

The brown seaweed Sargassumsp. is well known as a source of fucoidan. Brown seaweeds found in Indonesia seas are dominated by Sargassum sp.The objectives of this research was to purify and characterize fucoidan from S. binderi Sonder. The fresh raw material was defatted by macerated in methanol:chloroform:water (4:2:1), filtered, rinsed with acetone and then air-dried in room temperature. The defatted dried seaweed was extracted with 0.01M HCl pH 4 at room temperature. Purification has been conducted using anion exchanger. The quality of fucoidan sample was determined for total sugar, functional group using FTIR, monomer content, total ash, and total sulfate in the ester form. The result shows that pure fucoidan contains fucose as the primary sugar component, and otherminor sugars (galactose, glucose, mannose and xylose). Chemical composition of crude fucoidan consisted of 74.25% fucose; 0.28% uronate acid; 10.29% sulfate and 5.5% protein. Purification using DEAE Sephadex A-25 gave 4 fraction pools yielding total sugar (%) of F1 (17.59); F2 (18.92); F3 (13.72); F4 (49.76), respectively. The components that build the fucoidan of S. binderi Sonder were estimated derived to be from fucoidan oligomers including (1,4)-L-FucS-Gal and D-(1,4)-Gal-GalS. 
Preface Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 2 Tahun 2015 Bulletin, Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.334

Abstract

Algal Lectins and their Potential Uses Praseptiangga, Danar
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.125

Abstract

Lectins (hemagglutinins), or carbohydrate-binding proteins, are ubiquitous in nature and play important roles in many biological processes. They bind mono- and oligosaccharides reversibly with high specificity, but are devoid of catalytic activity, and in contrast to antibodies, are not products of an immune response. The erythrocyte agglutination or hemagglutination activity of lectins is a major attribute of these proteins and is used routinely for their detection and characterization. Due to their biochemical and biological properties, lectins attract a great deal of attention in the fields of medicine, molecular biology, biochemistry, and glycobiology. Lectins have been isolated and characterized from marine algae. Many of algal lectins generally have common characteristics of low molecular weight, no divalent cations requirements for their activity, and have an affinity for glycoproteins but not for monosaccharides. These properties imply that they may possess molecular structures and carbohydrate-binding specificities distinct from known lectins from other sources. Recent investigations revealed that algal lectins have the strict binding specificity to some definite oligosaccharide structures and are grouped into several types on the basis of oligosaccharide-binding specificity. Thus, marine algae are promising sources of novel lectin molecules for basic research and application. In spite of the progress made in biochemical characterization of algal lectins, additional information are still needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their molecular structures and possible biological functions for the future applications.
Back Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 2 Tahun 2015 Bulletin, Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.335

Abstract

Influence of Anthropogenic Pressures on the Bioactivity Potential of Sponges and Soft Corals in the Coral Reef Environment Hedi Indra Januar; Ekowati Chasanah; Dianne M. Tapiolas; Cherie A. Motti; Catherine H. Liptrot; Anthony D. Wright
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 2 (2015): August 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i2.108

Abstract

The wealth of marine sponges and soft corals in Indonesian waters represents a rich source of natural products. However, anthropogenic pressures potentially decrease diversity in coral reefs. Presented here are trends for tropical sponge and soft coral biodiversity and their bioactivity potential under the influence of increasing anthropogenic pressures. Samples were collected along transects (near, mid, and far) at Karimunjawa and Seribu Islands Marine National Parks and environmental parameters (salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), phosphate, nitrate, and ammonia), sponge and soft coral biodiversity, and the bioactivity potential of those organisms (50% Growth Inhibition (GI50) of cancer cell lines H460-Lung, MCF7-Breast, and SF268-CNS) are compared. The environmental conditions and biodiversity were found to be significantly different between groups of sampling sites (P0.05). Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA) revealed DO was the discriminant factor driving the separation between groups (90.1%). Diversity tended to be higher in the Far group with strong and significant relation to DO (R= 0.611, P0.05) and ammonia (R = -0.812, P0.05). The CDA also showed that an increase in bioactivity (low % GI50) of sponge and soft coral extracts was related to a canonical function (57.21%) consisting of high DO, high pH, and low nutrients. These findings indicate the production of bioactive compounds is related to diversity and complexity of coral reef systems. Therefore, strategies for marine protection by mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic pressures needs to be optimized in order to conserve the overall environment and sustain its natural bioactivity potential indefinitely.

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