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Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015" : 8 Documents clear
Biodiversity of Cellulolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Solid Wastes of Agar Seaweed Processing Industry Ifah Munifah; Titi Candra Sunarti; Hari Eko Irianto; Anja Meryandini
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.129

Abstract

Agar is polysaccharide extracted from the seaweed Gracilaria sp. It is commonly used for food, medical, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The red seaweed Gracilaria verrucosa is the most common material used for the extraction of agar, processed into sheet and powder. A total of 7169 tons solid waste is produced from the agar industry in Indonesia which can further result in 4301.4 tons per year of cellulose. However, solid wastes from agar seaweed processing industry have not been managed and used optimally, and therefore seaweed solid wastes can be used as one of alternative source of cellulose and cellulolytic bacteria. In this research, we reported the isolation of cellulose-producing bacteria from seaweed processing industry wastes using specific media 1 % LIA (Limbah Industri Agar, waste of seaweed processing industry). Sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA genes amplified from the obtained 7 isolates identified them as Serratia marcescens, Chryseobacterium indovlogenes, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus cereus, Strenatrophomonas maltophila, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Front Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 3 Tahun 2015 Squalen Bulletin
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.329

Abstract

Preface Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 3 Tahun 2015 Squalen Bulletin
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.332

Abstract

Quality Changes of Pangasius Fillets During Ice Storage Diah Ikasari; Theresia Dwi Suryaningrum
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.134

Abstract

Quality asessment of pangasius (Pangasius hypopthalmus) fillets stored in ice has been conducted. Fish were fasted for one day and slaughtered using bleeding techniques, drained for 10 minutes and filleted in various types of fillet: skin on, skinless, trimmed and untrimmed condition. Fillets were then washed and packed in vacuum plastics, stored in ice (0-4 ºC) for 18 days and observed for its sensory, chemical and microbiological parameters every 3 days. The sensory evaluation was conducted both for fresh or cooked fillets using scoring test on attribute of appearance, odor and texture as well as hedonic test. The chemical parameters observed were proximate; pH and Total Volatile Base (TVB); while microbiological parameter was Total Plate Count (TPC). Results showed that type of fillet did not significantly affect the quality of pangasius fillets. The quality of all treated fillet decreased in line with time of storage, all products were rejected after being stored for 18 days. At the time of rejection, the quality parameters: moisture content ranging from 80.1 to 81.3%, TVB from 11.1 to 11.5 mg N/100g and TPC from 1.41 to 4.6x105 CFU/ml. It is suggested to preserve pangasius fillets in ice less than 18 days.
Non-Target Screening Method for the Identification of Persistent and Emerging Organic Contaminants in Seafood and Sediment from Jakarta Bay Dwiyitno Dwiyitno; Larissa Dsikowitzky; Nuri Andarwulan; Hari Eko Irianto; Hanifah Nuryani Lioe; Farida Ariyani; Jan Schwarzbauer
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.175

Abstract

Identification of persistent and emerging organic contaminants in green mussels (Perna viridis), various fishes, banana shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and sediment samples from Jakarta Bay has been employed. A non-target GC-MS screening approach has identified more than 60 individual organic compounds from the whole fractions either non-polar, semi-polar or acidic-polar compounds. The substances comprised as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including DDT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) and its metabolites as well as high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs). Noteworthy, a number of emerging contaminants detected in the present study have never been reported previously either from the same location or from Asian waters. They include some priority contaminants of non-persistence halogens and emission of technical products, such as di-iso-propylnaphthalenes (DIPNs) dichlorobenzene (DCB), dichlorodiphenyl chloroethene (DDMU) and phenylmethoxynaphthalene (PMN). In general, the concentration order of the priority organic contaminants was sediment green mussel fishes shrimp. Further analysis based on the spatial distribution, individual concentrations and bioavailability suggested that some contaminants are applicable as molecular marker for the assessment of anthropogenic emission in Jakarta Bay, i.e. DIPNs, linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), phenylmethoxynaphthalene (PMN), PAHs, dichlorobenzene, DDT and its metabolites.
Back Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 10 No. 3 Tahun 2015 Bulletin, Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.331

Abstract

CHARACTERISTICS OF KAMABOKO FROM CATFISH (CLARIAS GARIEPINUS) SURIMI PROCESSED WITH CARROT AND BEET ROOT AS FILLER AND NATURAL FOOD COLORANTS Suryaningrum, Theresia Dwi; Irianto, Hari Eko; Ikasari, Diah
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (512.94 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.169

Abstract

The objective of the  study was to investigate  the effect of beet root  and carrot as filler and natural food colourant on the  chemical, physical  and sensory properties of kamaboko. Kamaboko from catfish (Clarias gariepinus) surimi was  processed with carrot (Daucus carota) and beet root (Beta vulgaris) at two concentrations (12 and 16%  of surimi weight). Assesment was done on chemical (proximate, pH), physical (folding test, WHC, gel strength and breaking force) properties as well as sensory evaluation. The results showed that kamaboko gel processed using beet root had better performance than kamaboko gel processed using carrot. Kamaboko processed  using beet root has protein content, folding test, water holding capacity, gel strength, breaking force, and sensory characteristics (appearance, colour, odor, texture, and taste)  better than kamaboko processed with carrot.  Increasing concentration of filler only affect on the gel strength and breaking force of kamaboko processed with beet root.  The best characteristic of kamaboko was obtained from kamaboko processed using beet root  with concentration of 12%. However, beet root was not recommended as colourant since the colour was not stable especially when stored at freezer.
Screening of Marine Bacteria Capable of Degrading Various Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons Elvi Yetti; Ahmad Thontowi; Yopi Y; Puspita Lisdiyanti
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.123

Abstract

This research aims to screen and to identify marine bacteria able to degrade Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). 7 bacterial isolates were screened for the ability to degrade 6 PAHs (phenanthrene, naphthalene, dibenzothiophene, fluorene, phenothiazine, and pyrene). This screening step was conducted by sublimation method, in which the color change or clear zone appearance was used as an qualitative indicator to show the capability of the selected isolate to degrade PAHs. Two bacterial isolates, designated as LBF-1-0102 and LBF1-0103, showed capability in degradating the PAHs tested. In particular, the isolate LBF-1-102 was potential in degrading phenanthrene, naphthalene, dibenzothiphene, fluorene, phenothiazine, and pyrene.The isolate LBF-1-0103  showed the ability in degrading 2 (two) PAHs, i.e. dibenzothiophene and  fluorene. Based on partial 16S rDNA analysis, LBF-1-0102 and LBF-1-0103 were identified as Pseudomonas balerica and Brachybacterium sp., respectively.

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