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Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018" : 8 Documents clear
Influence of Salinity on Growth and Phycoerythrin Production of Rhodomonas salina Endar Marraskuranto; Tri J Raharjo; Rina S Kasiamdari; Tri R Nuringtyas
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.365

Abstract

Microalgae is a photoautotroph organism capable of producing various photosynthetic pigments with diverse beneficial properties. Rhodomonas salina, a Cryptophyte cell, contains only phycoerythrin as its phycobiliprotein pigment. The effects of salinity on growth and phycoerythrin concentration were investigated. Microalgae R. salina were grown in natural sea water with salinity of 33‰ and 50‰.The microalgae was batch-cultured in f/2 medium at light irradiation of 1100 lux, temperature of 24–26 oC, and photoperiode of 12 h : 12 h. The microalgae cell density was directly calculated using haemacytometer. The concentration of phycoerythrin was determined by spectrophotometric method. The cell density and phycoerythrin concentration were monitored every 4 days for 20 days of cell growth. Results showed that salinity did not affect significantly both on growth and phycoerythrin concentration extracted from R. salina biomass (p0.05; a = 0.05). At both salinity, maximum phycoerythrin concentration were reached on day 8. There was a positive correlation between cell density and phycoerythrin concentration from day 1 to day 8 of cell growth. Microalgae R. salina which was grown in natural seawater with salinity of 33‰ achieved the highest cell density of 8.4 x 105 cells/mL and the phycoerythrin concentration of 0.19 mg. 10-5 cell on day 8 of the culture. The highest phycoerythrin concentration was obtained on day 16 of the culture i.e 0.27 mg. 10-5 cell.Keywords: cell density, growth media, phycoerythrin, Rhodomonas salina, salinity
Method Comparison of DNA Isolation and Quantification for Fish and Seafood Authenticity Determination Dwiyitno Dwiyitno; Stefan Hoffman; Koen Parmentier; Chris Van Keer
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.370

Abstract

Fish and seafood products has been commonly targeted for fraudulent activities. For that reason, authentication of fish and seafood products is important to protect consumers from fraudulent and adulteration practices, as well as to implement traceability regulation. From the viewpoint of food safety, authenticity is beneficial to protect public from serious food poisoning incidents, such as due to ingestion of toxic species. Since DNA based identification depends on the nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the quantity and quality/purity of DNA will contribute significantly to the species authentication. In the present study, different DNA extraction and purification methods (3 classical methods and one commercial kit) were compared to produce the better isolated DNA for PCR amplification. Additionally, different methods for the estimation of DNA concentration and purity which is essential for PCR amplification efficiency were also evaluated. The result showed that classical DNA extraction methods (based on TNES-Urea) yielded a higher amount of DNA (11.30-323.60 ng/g tissue) in comparison to commercial kit/Wizard Promega (5.70-83.45 ng/g tissue). Based on the purity of DNA extract (A260/280), classical DNA extraction method produced relatively similar on DNA quality to the commercial kit (1.79-2.12). Interestingly, all classical methods produced DNA with A260/280 ratio of more than 2.00 on the blue mussel, in contrast with commercial kit. The commercial kit also produced better quality of DNA compared to the classical methods, showing the higher efficiency in PCR amplification. NanoDrop is promising as cheap, robust and safe UV-spectrophotometer method for DNA quantification, as well as the purity evaluation.Keywords: seafood authenticity, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, NanoDrop, Picogreen
Characteristics of Solid Waste Agar Industries Ifah Munifah; Hari Eko Irianto
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.292

Abstract

Agar processed from red seaweed Gracilaria sp. in Indonesia can be found in the form of sheet and powder. The abundance of cellulose in agar solid waste can be used as an alternative source of carbon for microorganism growth. The purpose of this study was to determine the component of agar solid waste and to characterize the cellulose. The agar solid waste (limbah industri agar-agar, LIA) was undergone physical separation process into agar, fiber cellulose, and celite. The result showed that agar solid waste consisted of 53.53% fiber; 37.33% agar and 8.60% celite. LIA was characterized for its components including ash, lignin, extractive substances, cellulose, hemicellulose, and holocellulose using Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry Method (TAPPI). The TAPPI analysis revealed that solid waste generated from seaweed Gracilaria sp processing had 28.19% cellulose, 38.83% holocellulosa, 10.63% hemicellulose, 8.27% ash, 3.54% insoluble acid ash, 11.23% water, and 1.62% extractives substances. The lignin content of the solid waste was low (2.08%), therefore it has potential to be utilized as biomass (bio fertilizer, alternative carbon source). The components in solid waste of agar was determined using Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR). The LIA sample had high content of celite indicated by the absorption peak which appears at wave length 2343.45 cm-1 for the -Si-H bond and at the wave length 772.99 cm-1 for the bond -Si- O-. Infra-red spectra showed that celite still exist in solid waste of agar. The study indicated that there was still a large amount of cellulose in the solid waste of agar. Keywords: solid waste, cellulose, agar, lignin, celite
Front Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 13 No. 3 Tahun 2018 Squalen Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.371

Abstract

Metabolite Profiles and Antioxidant Activity of Caulerpa racemosa with Different Handlings sihono, Sihono; Tarman, Kustiariyah; Madduppa, Hawis; Januar, Hedi Indra
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.355

Abstract

 Metabolite profiles and antioxidant activity of Caulerpa racemosa extract with different handlings were investigated. Three different handlings during transportation were applied, namely samples chilled with ice, stored in liquid nitrogen and soaked in seawater. The different handling significantly affected the yield of ethanolic crude extracts and inorganic fractions but insignificantly to organic fractions. Different handlings resulted in differences of major fractions of C. racemosa extracts. Major fractions of the sample that was handled with chilling temperature contained low polar fractions (K10, K11, K12, and K13), while seawater handling extract contained very polar (K1, K2 and K3), polar (K6, K7, and K8) and low polar (K13) fractions. The extract of the sample handled in liquid nitrogen contained balanced fractions. Chilling temperature handling produced highest antioxidant activity (IC50 below 2,000 ppm) in ethanolic extract of C. racemosa. Keywords: antioxidant activity, Caulerpa racemosa, ethanolic extract,handlings, IC50
Back Cover Squalen Bulletin Vol. 13 No. 3 Tahun 2018 Squalen, Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.373

Abstract

Identification of Protease-Producing Bacteria Isolated from Banyuwedang, Bali, and Characterization of its Protease Zilda, Dewi Seswita; Fawzya, Yusro Nuri; Uria, Agustinus Robert
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.367

Abstract

Proteases or peptidases is known as a largest group of hydrolytic enzymes and have been applied in various industries such as food, pharmacy, leather, detergent and waste treatment. Although they are also produced by plants and animals, microbes remain the main source of proteases in the world market which mostly derived from Bacillus sp. Aims of this research were to identify isolate BII-1 and study its protease. Analysis of 16Sr RNA sequencing showed the identity of BII-1 as Bacillus subtilis (99% similarity with the same species in GenBank). It was found that protease from BII-1 exhibited optimal temperature and pH of 50 oC and 8-9, respectively. It was activated by Li2+, Na2+, Mg2+ and K+. The degenerated primer for protease gene was designed, and a partial protease gene was amplified from BII-1. The sequencing result showed that this amplified gene shared 100 and 99% similarity with those from Geobacillus thermophiles and Bacillus subtilis in the GenBank, respectively.Keywords: protease, bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, Geobacillus thermophylus
Preface Squalen Bulletin Vol. 13 No. 3 Tahun 2018 Squalen, Squalen
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 13, No 3 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v13i3.374

Abstract

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