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Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010" : 5 Documents clear
Shelf life assessment of fishery product. By: Suryanti and Theresia Dwi Suryaningrum suryanti, suryanti
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v5i1.41

Abstract

The processing of fishery product is a preservation way to maintain its shelf life. The shelf life offishery product is very crucial, since it is an important source of animal protein which is easilydegraded by microbial activity and enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, fish also contains highunsaturated fatty acid which is easy to oxidize and produce rancid odor. The shelf life prediction offishery product is usually studied using conventional(ESS) and accelerated method (ASLT) Arheniusmodel. The conventional method predicts the shelf life of food product at the normal condition andobserve the parameter of quality degradation until the expired quality is reached. ASLT methodArhenius model predicts the shelf life of food product with accelerate the quality degradationbecause of effect temperature. The conventional method can be applied for wet and semi-wetproducts, such as fish fillet and fish burger, where as Arhenius model can be applied for wet, semiwet and dry products, such as frozen shrimp and dendeng fish.
Utilization of fish oil for biodiesel production Tri Nugroho Widianto; Bagus Sediadi Bandol Utomo
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v5i1.42

Abstract

Recenty fossil fuel consumption gradually increases, resulting in decreases of its naturalresource and causing environmental problems such as air pollution and global warming.Attempts to overcome the problems have been made to create on alternative energy such asbiodiesel from jatropha, microalgae and fish oil. Biodiesel production, as matter of fact, can beconducted using industrial wastes of fish meal, fish fillets and fish canning by transesterification offish oil using methanol and alkaline catalyst. Transesterification reaction kinetics must beconsidered for an efficient process. Transesterification rate constant very much depends on thetemperature and the quantity of the catalyst
Biodiesel production from microalgae Botryococcus braunii Sriamini sriamini; Rini Susilowati
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v5i1.43

Abstract

Increasing energy needs cause diminishing energy resources. This encourages the searchfor renewable energy sources to anticipate scarcity. One of the new energy source is microalgae.Microalgae have a high variation of species and have a great potential to be developed as foodand other chemical products. Microalgae has been developed as a potential source of biodieselto replace petroleum fuels derived from foss ils. Of several microalgae s pecies studied,Botryococcus braunii produces the largest oil content, i.e. 75% dry weight. This paper describessteps of producing oil from B. brauniiwhich includes preparation of microalgae biomass,biomass harvesting, and extraction of oil. Oil content of B. braunii is composed mostly ofhydrocarbons (± 15–76% by dry weight), called botryococcene. This type of hydrocarbon ispotential as an energy source of biodiesel.
Alginates modification and the prospective uses of their products. Subaryono Subaryono
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v5i1.40

Abstract

Alginate is a natural hydrocolloid that is used in food and non food industries. The weakness ofnative alginate cause the limited uses of this material in industry. Some weaknesses of nativealginate had been successfully overcome either by the modification of alginate structure orinteraction of alginate with another substances. The low solubility of alginate and its low stabilityagainst acid had been successfully resolved with esterification of alginate backbone with propyleneglycol, producing propylene glycol alginate (PGA). The high syneresis of alginate gel had beensuccessfully overcome with partial hydrolysis, producing short chain alginate, introduce shortchain polyguluronate and interact alginate with other substances such as locust bean gum (LBG).Alginate hydrophilic properties could be changed into amphiphilic by long alkyl chain substitutiontowards part of the polysaccharides group. The ability of alginate to promote the growth of probioticbacteria could be done by enzymatic hydrolysis of alginate using alginate lyase producingalginate oligosaccharides (AOS). The modification of alginate had opened the big opportunity forthe uses of alginate and its derivatives, both in food and non food sectors.
Astaxanthin produced by marine bacteria: biosynthesis, uses, and the potency of mass production Naely Kurnia Wusqy; Ferry Fredy Karwur
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 5, No 1 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (431.125 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v5i1.44

Abstract

Astaxanthin (3,3‘-dihydroxy-β, β-carotene-4, 4’-dione) is an orange-red xanthophylls that contains 40 carbon atoms which is connected by single and double bonds to form fitoen chains inwhich their all-trans isomer are found in nature together with a small amount of 9-cis and 13-cisisomers. Fitoen chains of astaxanthin begin and end by ionon chains. Astaxanthin belongs to thexanthophylls group because it has oxygen rings. Some marine bacteria are reported to produceastaxanthin i.e Brevundimonas, Paracoccus hundaenensis, Alcaligenes andAgrobacteriumaurantiacum. This paper describes astaxanthin production in marine bacterial cells including itsbiosynthesis from β-carotene conversion and enzyme taking a role in this biosynthesis, and itsmass production for commercial purposes. This review also describes about their uses for foodand health purposes.

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