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Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011" : 5 Documents clear
usage hydraulic press to separate sap from Eucheuma cottonii Jamal Basmal
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v6i2.62

Abstract

Function of hydraulic press in fresh handling of seaweed is to separate sap from its thallus tofasten its drying process. A device model of hydraulic press has been developed at the ResearchCenter for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnology with a pressure energy(force power) of 30 tons at 4 kWh. During the use of force power of 10 tons/900 cm2for 10 minutesfor 10 kg of seaweed, 20.6% of sap was obtained. Sap is known to contain 2,000 ppm of auxin,1,500 ppm of giberelin (GA3), 1,200 ppm of zeatin and 1,000 ppm of kinetine. In horticulture, ithas been applied to promote growth rate in plants and to increase the production of fruits.
Prospects for the utilization of marine bioenergy for coastal and small islands in Indonesia Asep Bayu
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v6i2.63

Abstract

Marine bioenergy is the use of marine biomass for energy resources either directly or indirectlyvia chemical preparation. The end bioenergy products that can be derived are biobriket frommangrove, biogas from macroalgae, biodiesel from microalgae and bintaro seed and bioethanolfrom seagrass and nipah palm. The advantages of marine bioenergy compared to those fromsolar and wind are its abundant supply of raw materials as well as the low cost and simplicity of itsenergy conversion technologies. Marine bioenergy is capable to cover three main sectors ofenergy needed by coastal communities. The supply of energy can be reassured since the conceptof energy harvesting can be applied to transform coastal regions into “Desa Mandiri Energy”.Cultivation of energy crops may also provide new employments and increase public awarenesson the importance of coastal marine biology resources. Therefore, marine bioenergy could be anideal alternative that supports not only energy security, but also social, economy, and ecologyaspects.
Performance of bioreactor and pH meter instrument in bioethanol producing process from brown seaweed(Sargassum duplicatum) Rodiah Nurbaya Sari; Diah Lestari Ayudiarti; Diini Fithriani
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v6i2.64

Abstract

To meet the energy needs this time we are still dependent on energy derived from fossilresources that can not be recovered (fossil energy). The way to tackle the energy problem is toexplore other energy resources namely biofuels, one of its kind is bioethanol. Source of potentiallyraw material from the sea is brown seaweed which cellulose content and stored carbohydrate(mannitol) is quite high. The use of a batch bioreactor and the pH meter instrument assembliesResearch Center for Marine and Fisheries Products Processing and Biotechnology (RCMFPPB)has been supporting the production of bioethanol with raw material brown seaweed Sargassumduplicatum.
Application of docking method to assess the activity of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (HCB) from marine origin in bioremediation process Ariyanti Suhita Dewi
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v6i2.60

Abstract

Hydrocarbons are one of the main sources of acute and chronic stressors in marine environmentthat are potentially damaging the ecosystem if not properly overcame. As an attempt to restore theenvironment, microbial degradation is a logical solution owing to its low cost and environmentalfriendliness. Screening of microbes with bioremediation activities can be performed in vitrobymeans of high throughput screening (HTS) and/or in silicovia docking method. The latter haspractical advantages over the first in terms of time and cost. In this review, the use of virtualscreening is demonstrated to analyse the specificity of cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP) enzymefrom hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Result showed thatCCP is a decent receptor for simple aromatic hydrocarbons. Despite previous reports on thealkane degradation activities of M. hydrocarbonoclasticus, this result demonstrates a newperspective on its potential to bioremediate low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon(PAH) with moderate activity.
Distribution of brown seaweed producing alginate in Indonesia and the potential utilization Subaryono Subaryono
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 6, No 2 (2011): August 2011
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v6i2.61

Abstract

Brown seaweed producing alginate frequently obtained in Indonesian waters , especially fromgenus of Sargassum and Turbinaria. These seaweeds are wide distributed from Aceh to Papuawaters. There are 15 species of Sargassum and some species of Turbinaria in Indonesia. Thisseaweed were very potential used as a row material of alginate industry, with main market Chinaand Malaysia. Quality requirement for seaweed as row material for alginate industry in China werealginate content not less than 17%, viscosity 47 cP, and gel strength 139 g/cm2. Expansion ofalginate industry in Indonesia was limited by low continuity of row material production. Prospectiveutilization of this brown seaweed as a row material of drug/traditional herbal medicine were sohigh because its ability to reducing high blood glucose in diabetes patient and decelerate thegrowth of cancer cell. Natural seaweed collection were done at peak season production on dryseason, and help out to increase the welfare of seaweed collection farmer.

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