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INDONESIA
Squalen Bulletin of Marine and Fisheries Postharvest and Biotechnology
ISSN : 20895690     EISSN : 24069272     DOI : -
Squalen publishes original and innovative research to provide readers with the latest research, knowledge, emerging technologies, postharvest, processing and preservation, food safety and environment, biotechnology and bio-discovery of marine and fisheries. The key focus of the research should be on marine and fishery and the manuscript should include a fundamental discussion of the research findings and their significance. Manuscripts that simply report data without providing a detailed interpretation of the results are unlikely to be accepted for publication in the journal.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012" : 5 Documents clear
SYNTHESIS OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL-CHITOSAN HYDROGEL AND STUDY OF ITS SWELLING AND ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES Wikanta, Thamrin; Erizal, Mr; Tjahyono, Mr; Sugiyono, Mr
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v7i1.10

Abstract

The aim of this research was to synthesize a hydrogel for wound dressing by mixing of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and chitosan (CTS) and processed by combination technique of freezing-thawing and irradiation by gamma ray, and to study of its properties. PVA aqueous solution 10% (w/v) was mixed with 2% (w/v) chitosan (CTS) solution and homogenized. The PVA-CTS mixture was processed by freezing-thawing up to 3 cycles, and then irradiated by gamma rays at the doseranged of 20-50 kGy  (dose rate was 10 kGy/hour). Result showed that PVA-CTS hydrogel with the gel fraction of 83%, 87%, 90%, and 83% were obtained at the irradiation dose of 20 kGy, 30 kGy, 40 kGy, and 50 kGy, respectively. Increasing of irradiation dose caused increasing of water absorption of hydrogel, i.e. 1.700 %, 1.715 %, 1.913 %, and 2.036 %, respectively, and the hydrogel reached the equilibrium in 25 hours. The hydrogel showed very slow water evaporation rate (~ 2%) at the initial time (1 hour) and then increased very fast (up ~50 %) at 24 h, i.e. 43%, 39.13%, 44%, and 53%, respectively. The elongation at break of hydrogels were obtained 245%, 322%, 322%, and 205% with the maximum value were obtained at irradiation dose ranged of 30-40 kGy. The presence of chitosan in the PVA hydrogel made it having higher antibacterial properties with the inhibitionzone value of 8 mm at irradiation dose of 30-40 kGy compared to PVA hydrogel as a negative control (6 mm) and to chloramphenicol as a positive control (8 mm).
IDENTIFICATION AND PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CRUDE EXTRACELLULAR ENZYMES FROM BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SHRIMP WASTE PROCESSING Chasanah, Ekowati; Ali, Mahrus; Ilmi, Miftahul
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v7i1.11

Abstract

Attention on chitin degrading enzymes has been growing since their ability to reduce the waste of shrimp/other crustaceans processing industries and converting them into value added products such as biologically active chitin and chitosan oligomer. Previous experiment found that KLU 11.16 isolate was one of the potential bacteria isolated from shrimp waste producing chitinolytic enzymes including chitosanases. A study on the identification of KLU 11.16 extracellularcrude enzyme was carried out by cultivating the bacteria on chitin medium. Due to the wide application of chitosanase, the characterization of the crude chitosanase was carried out after an identification of the enzymes secreted. Based on assessment using zymogram technique, this bacteria secreted a mixed extracellular chitinolytic enzyme and other hydrolytic enzyme. The crudechitinolytic enzyme degraded 85% deacetylated (DA) better than 100% DA chitosan, and slightly degraded glycol chitin, indicating that KLU 11.16 secreted chitosanases and chitinases enzyme. In addition to the chitinolytic enzyme, the bacteria also secreted protein and carbohydrate degrading enzymes when running at SDS-PAGE enriched with casein, soluble starch and CMC substrates.Crude chitosanases enzyme was performed well at pH 6 and temperature of 300C, and the activity can be increased by addition of 1 mM Fe 2+ in form of chloride salt. Addition of detergent, i.e1mM of Triton X-100 and SDS slightly decreased the activity. Future application of the crude chitosanase from KLU 11.16 was on producing chitosan derivative such as chitosan oligomer using substrateof 85% DA chitosan, which is more digestable by other enzymes secreted by KLU 11.16
BACTERIAL DIVERSITY OF THE DEEP SEA OF SANGIHE TALAUD, SULAWESI Gintung Patantis; Ekowati Chasanah; Dewi Seswita Zilda; Ikhsan B. Waluyo
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v7i1.12

Abstract

Deep sea is an extreme environment characterized by cold temperature, high pressure, lackof  light and nutrients. Microorganisms live in these habitat are unique microorganisms andknown to have tremendous source of potential agents for biotechnology processes. Indonesia asan archipelagic country has a vast deep ocean. This study aims to see the diversity of bacteria inSangihe Talaud Deep Sea, Sulawesi. Analysis of bacterial diversity was carried out by culturedand uncultured method. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniquewas used for uncultured analysis of the microorganisms biodiversity, while cultured one wasdone by plating the samples of water onto Zobell media. The results showed that, there were 21isolates obtained by cultured method. The identification which based on 16S rDNA by PCR methodshowed the genus of Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Alteromonas, Vibrio, Shewanella andUncultured bacterium were identified. However, 14 classes of bacteria were obtained by usingTRFLP method i.e Acetobacteraceae class, Actinobacteria, α-proteobacteria, -proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, Bacili, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Chroococcales, Clostridia,Erysipelotrichi, Synergistia, and Zetaproteobacteria. here were also  unclassified bacteria anduncultured bacterium found in the samples.
THE POTENTIAL OF HETEROTROPHIC MICROALGAE (Schizochytrium sp.) AS A SOURCE OF DHA Arif Rahman Hakim
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v7i1.13

Abstract

Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is commercially obtained from marine fish. With an increasinghuman population, the supplies of DHA are still not sufficient to meet the world’s need of DHA asfood supplement. The objective of this review is to discuss Schizochytrium sp., one of microalgaewhich is rich in DHA, as one of the best candidate as producer of sustainable and affordable DHA.Heterotrophic microalgae, especially genus Schizochytrium, produces omega-3 fatty acids up to40% of total unsaturated fatty acids.  Cultivation of the microalgae is easy as it does not requiresunlight as source of energy. Previous publication reported that several local strains ofSchizochytrium have been isolated from mangrove area in Indonesia. We expect that thosestrains can be cultivated in mass production as producer of DHA.
APPLICATION OF MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING (MAP) ON FRESH FISH Putri Wullandari; Diini Fithriani
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 7, No 1 (2012): May 2012
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v7i1.14

Abstract

Packaging has many functions, e.g. as containment, to protect products from physical damage,and from H2O, O2, and CO2 exposure, as well as to attract the consumers. Based on the technology,packaging  can  be  divided  into  3 types i.e.  passive  packaging,  active  packaging,  and smartpackaging. Modified Atmosphere Packaging  (MAP)  is the most  common  active  packaging  foundin  the market. MAP has been used  to extend  the shelf  life of several  fish such as  raw whiting  (codfamily), mackerel,  salmon  fillet, cod  fillet,  fresh bluefin  tuna  fillet,  etc. MAP which was combinedwith  freeze-chilling has been proved  to extend the shelf  life   of  raw whiting, mackerel, and  salmonfillet. MAP also  increased  cod  fillet’s  shelf  life  up  to 20  days, whiting  fillets packed  in  100% CO2and stored at 4°C temperature up to 15 days. MAP combined with antioxidant on fresh bluefin tunafillets stored at 3°C  for 18  days was able to extend products shelf  life  from 2 days  (control)  to 18days, meanwhile 100% N2 in packaging has  protective effect  on haemoglobin  and  lipid oxidation.Packaging innovations and ingenuity will continuously develop MAP  that is oriented  for consumer,enhance  the product, environmentally  responsive, friendly, and  cost effective.

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