cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009" : 8 Documents clear
Predicting Nonlinear Behavior and Stress-Strain Relationship of Rectangular Confined Reinforced Concrete Columns with ANSYS T. Tavio; A. Tata
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1147.801 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 23-31

Abstract

This paper presents a nonlinear finite element modeling and analysis of rectangular normal-strength reinforced concrete columns confined with transverse steel under axial compressive loading. In this study, the columns were modeled as discrete elements using ANSYS nonlinear finite element software. Concrete was modeled with 8-noded SOLID65 elements that can translate either in the x-, y-, or z-axis directions from ANSYS element library. Longitudinal and transverse steels were modeled as discrete elements using 3D-LINK8 bar elements available in the ANSYS element library. The nonlinear constitutive law of each material was also implemented in the model. The results indicate that the stress-strain relationships obtained from the analytical model using ANSYS are in good agreement with the experimental data. This has been confirmed with the insignificant difference between the analytical and experimental, i.e. 5.65 and 2.80 percent for the peak stress and the strain at the peak stress, respectively. The comparison shows that the ANSYS nonlinear finite element program is capable of modeling and predicting the actual nonlinear behavior of confined concrete column under axial loading. The actual stress-strain relationship, the strength gain and ductility improvement have also been confirmed to be satisfactorily.
Influence of Plastic Waste Fibers on the Strength of Lime-Rice Husk Ash Stabilized Clay Soil A. S. Muntohar
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (290.025 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 32-40

Abstract

A study has been undertaken to investigate the strength of stabilized clay-soil reinforced with randomly distributed discrete plastic waste fibers by carrying out unconfined compressive strength and tensile-split strength test. In this study, the clay soil was stabilized with lime and rice husk ash mixtures. The effect of the fiber length and content on the compressive and split tensile strength was investigated. The laboratory investigation results show that inclusion of the plastic waste fiber increased significantly both the unconfined compressive strength and tensile-split strength of the stabilized clay soil. The fiber length plays a significant contribution in increasing the soil strength. To contribute for any significant improvement on compression as well as tensile strength, the fiber length should be in range of 20 mm to 40 mm. Fiber reinforcements also reduced soil brittleness by providing smaller loss of post-peak strength.
The Effects of Different Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength of Terracrete J. A. Ayangade; O. Alake; A. B. Wahab
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (611.762 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 41-45

Abstract

This research evaluated the effects of different curing methods on the compressive strength of terracrete. Several tests that included sieve analysis were carried out on constituents of terracrete (granite and laterite) to determine their particle size distribution and performance criteria tests to determine compressive strength of terracrete cubes for 7 to 35 days of curing. Sand, foam-soaked, tank and open methods of curing were used and the study was carried out under controlled temperature. Sixty cubes of 100 × 100 × 100mm sized cubes were cast using a mix ratio of 1 part of cement, 1½ part of latrite, and 3 part of coarse aggregate (granite) proportioned by weight and water – cement ratio of 0.62. The result of the various compressive strengths of the cubes showed that out of the four curing methods, open method of curing was the best because the cubes gained the highest average compressive strength of 10.3N/mm2 by the 35th day.
Seismic Progressive Collapse: Qualitative Point of View H. Wibowo; D. T. Lau
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (315.633 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 8-14

Abstract

Progressive collapse is a catastrophic structural phenomenon that can occur because of human-made and natural hazards. In progressive collapse mechanism, a single local failure may cause a significant deformation which then may lead to collapse of a structure. The current practices in progressive collapse analysis and design method generally focus on preventing progressive collapse due to abnormal gravity and blast loads. Progressive collapse behaviour of structures due to earthquake loads has not received as much attention. This paper presents a brief overview of the current state-of-knowledge, insights, and issues related to progressive collapse behaviour of structures caused by earthquake loading.
Flood Mitigation of Nyando River Using Duflow Modelling J. Joleha; V. Maino; A. Adyabadam; W. Zhao; S. Ke; T.H. Le
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (279.234 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 46-57

Abstract

Duflow surface water hydrodynamic model has been applied using a case study from Nyando catchment in the western part of Kenya in Africa to simulate various extreme flood behaviours and their retardation levels by using selected structural measures as flood mitigation techniques. The objective of this case study was to establish a design flood recommendable for mitigation, and to identify the most cost effective flood mitigation structure. Various design flows are simulated against the different proposed structures hence, the optimal structure can be recommended when economical, social and environmental constraints are considered in the decision making process. The proposed four flood mitigation structures flood plain extension, embankment (dykes), channel by-pass, and green-storage were simulated for 20-year recurrence interval flood to determine their individual responses in storing excess water. The result shows that building a green-storage is the best and optimal structure for flood mitigation.
Wind Affected Density Current Profile in a Small Semi-Enclosed Water Body B. S. Purwanto
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (675.661 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 58-68

Abstract

Density current is a type of current that occurs when fluid flow enters a fluid body of different density. The density difference introduces stratification state that requires treatment in the parameterization of turbulence. Due to the geometric shape of location of this study, which is considerably small semi-enclosed water body, a Quasi-Equilibrium Turbulent Energy (QETE) model was selected. QETE was selected because of its convenient parameterization of wind induced breaking wave effect on turbulence. Two equations of the model, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence macro length scale, were discretized and implemented into a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Application to density current simulation in the location of study was then carried out using the resulted model. To show how effective formulation of wind induced breaking wave effect would be, three parameterizations of turbulence were considered. They include QETE model with and without breaking wave effect boundary conditions (BC), and constant eddy viscosity turbulence parameterizations. It was clear from the simulation results that wind induced breaking-wave effect on the density current is quite significant.
Kriging-Based Finite Element Method: Element-By-Element Kriging Interpolation F. T. Wong; W. Kanok-Nukulchai
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (287.192 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 15-22

Abstract

An enhancement of the finite element method with Kriging shape functions (K-FEM) was recently proposed. In this method, the field variables of a boundary value problem are approximated using ‘element-by-element’ piecewise Kriging interpolation (el-KI). For each element, the interpolation function is constructed from a set of nodes within a prescribed domain of influence comprising the element and its several layers of neighbouring elements. This paper presents a numerical study on the accuracy and convergence of the el-KI in function fitting problems. Several examples of functions in two-dimensional space are employed in this study. The results show that very accurate function fittings and excellent convergence can be attained by the el-KI.
An Investigation of the Performance of Due Process Mechanism in the Execution of Construction Projects in Nigeria Ayangade J. A.; Wahab A.B.; Alake O.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (149.672 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.11.1.pp. 1-7

Abstract

Various procurement methods are in use in the award of public contract in Nigeria. The traditional method, which is widely used, has been criticized for its non-performance in projects execution and delivery. To avoid the adverse effects of the current contract procurement methods, Due Process mechanism was introduced. This study, therefore investigated the level of importance of due process by parties involved in the award of public contracts, the performance of Due Process and factors that may affect its functions. The survey was carried out by administering structured questionnaires and interviews on the practitioners in the construction industry that were in the private and public sectors. The data collected were analysed with the use of both descriptive and inferential statistics. The study showed that Due Process has become a new initiative being widely embraced by parties in public contract and has helped in saving public fund by corrupt practices that usually characterize award of contracts. The study also showed that the absence of legal and other institutional frameworks were among the factors that affect the performance of due process in the country.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 8


Filter by Year

2009 2009


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol. 24 No. 1 (2022): MARCH 2022 Vol. 23 No. 2 (2021): SEPTEMBER 2021 Vol. 23 No. 1 (2021): MARCH 2021 Vol. 22 No. 2 (2020): SEPTEMBER 2020 Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020 Vol. 21 No. 2 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol. 21 No. 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol. 20 No. 2 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol. 20 No. 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol. 19 No. 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol. 18 No. 2 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol. 18 No. 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol. 17 No. 3 (2015): SPECIAL EDITION Vol. 17 No. 2 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol. 17 No. 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol. 16 No. 2 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol. 16 No. 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol. 15 No. 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol. 14 No. 3 (2012): Special Edition Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol. 14 No. 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol. 13 No. 2 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol. 13 No. 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol. 12 No. 2 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol. 12 No. 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol. 11 No. 2 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol. 10 No. 2 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol. 10 No. 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol. 9 No. 2 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol. 8 No. 2 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol. 8 No. 1 (2006): MARCH 2006 Vol. 7 No. 2 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol. 7 No. 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol. 6 No. 2 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol. 6 No. 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol. 5 No. 2 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol. 5 No. 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol. 4 No. 2 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol. 4 No. 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol. 3 No. 2 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol. 3 No. 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol. 2 No. 2 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol. 2 No. 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol. 1 No. 2 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol. 1 No. 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 More Issue