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Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012" : 8 Documents clear
Influence of Curing Age and Mix Composition on Compressive Strength of Volcanic Ash Blended Cement Laterized Concrete Olawuyi, B.J.; Olusola, K.O.; Babafemi, A.J.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (525.509 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.84-91

Abstract

This study investigates the influence of curing age and mix proportions on the compressive strength of volcanic ash (VA) blended cement laterized concrete. A total of 288 cubes of 100mm dimensions were cast and cured in water for 3, 7, 28, 56, 90 and 120 days of hydration with cement replacement by VA and sand replacement by laterite both ranging from 0 to 30% respectively while a control mix of 28-day target strength of 25N/mm2 (using British Method) was adopted. The results show that the compressive strength of the VA-blended cement laterized concrete increased with the increase in curing age but decreased as the VA and laterite (LAT) contents increased. The optimum replacement level was 20%LAT/20%VA. At this level the compressive strength increased with curing age at a decreasing rate beyond 28 days. The target compressive strength of 25N/mm2 was achieved for this mixture at 90 days of curing. VA content and curing age was noted to have significant effect (α ≤ 0.5) on the compressive strength of the VA-blended cement laterized concrete.
The Impact of Changing Storage Area on Flood Magnitude and Occurrence Kusumastuti, D.I.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (614.656 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.57-63

Abstract

This study focuses on the impact of combined catchment and storage upon flood occurrences and flood peaks. A significant factor that plays an important role of the combined catchment and storage is the ratio of contributing catchment area to storage area (AC/AS) where the impact significantly shows increasing frequency of storage overflow and flood peaks with the increasing of AC/AS. Some case studies examined in this work, i.e. Way Pegadungan (Lampung, Sumatra) and NagaraRiver (South Kalimantan) catchments show similar behavior. Swamps located on the sides of downstream of Way Pegadungan as well as Nagara River act as storages during flood events. The dyke which was planned to be built increases the ratio of AC/AS significantly as storage area reduced considerably. This has an impact on flood peaks which can increase considerably. The improved understanding of these process controls will be useful in assisting the management of such catchments, particularly to assist in flood prevention and mitigation.
Increase on Strengths of Hot Weather Concrete by Self-Curing of Wet Porous Aggregate Sampebulu’, V.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (673.814 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.92-99

Abstract

The compressive and tensile strengths of concrete made in hot weather condition decreased due to loss of mixing water caused by high evaporation. One method to overcome the problem is the use of saturated fly ash aggregate. The water content in fly ash aggregate can flow out to the hardened cement paste to continue the hydration process. This “self-curing” mechanism could produce more hydration around the surface of fly ash aggregate which sub¬sequently increases concrete strength. Experimental study has been conducted in temperature of 20o to 40o with humidity of 70% for dry curing, water curing, and nearly 100% for fog curing. Effect of self-curing could be justified as the strengths of concrete using fly ash aggregates is higher than concrete using fly ash aggregates covered with silane agent, and crushed stone aggregates. Even in high temperature, the self-curing could increase the strengths of concrete due to bond strength around the surface of each fly ash aggregates.
Soil Liquefaction in Padang due to Padang Earthquake 30September 2009 Hakam, A.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (647.03 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.64-68

Abstract

The Padang earthquake of M7.6 on 30 September 2009 (30S’09) caused damage to buildings, houses, public water facilities, and road ways. Several buildings were damaged due to liquefaction. This paper describes the liquefaction potential in Padang based on the site observation and analytical examination. The liquefaction was observed at a number of sites including roadway, river bank and play ground. The samples of sand boils were sent to the laboratory to determine the soil grain size distributions. It is found that the fine-sand (diameter less than 0.4 mm) content of the liquefied soil samples is more than 65%. This type of soils satisfies the criteria of liquefaction susceptibility. Based on the field soil test data, the liquefaction potential of sites is also examined. The results show that the observed locations have liquefaction potential.
The Stability Analysis of the Lusi Mud Volcano Embankment Dams using FEM with a Special Reference to the Dam Point P10.D Agustawijaya, D.S.; Sukandi .
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1137.037 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.100-109

Abstract

Since the eruption of the Lusi Mud volcano in Sidoarjo, East Java, on May 2006, soil embankment dams have been built to keep hot mud within the ponds. Unfortunately, since the dams were sitting on poor weak ground, land subsidence intensively occurred around the dams. A finite element method (FEM) was, then, applied to evaluate the stability of the dams particularly of the dam point P10.D, being considered as the most unstable point over 29 other dam points. Results show that the dam displacements in vertical and horizontal directions were high. The total displacements of the final design were about 1.5 m in both static- and dynamic-state conditions. These modelled data show a similar trend with field measurement data. The dam had only a factor of safety of about 1.1, and the dam might fail through a deep slide mode.
A Simple Technique to Determine Interface Slip of Stud Connected SCC Girders Prakash, A.; Lakshmanan, N.; Anandavalli, N.; Madheswaran, C.K.; Iyer, N.R.; Rajasankar, J.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (478.15 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.110-120

Abstract

A simple technique is proposed to compute interface slip of stud connected steel-concrete composite (SCC) girders based on the results of a flexure test. The technique makes use of relative longitudinal displacement of the concrete slab and steel beam to calculate the interface slip. In the flexure test of a SCC girder, a cost-effective instrumentation arrangement consisting of mechanical dial gauges is used to measure the relative longitudinal displacement. Responses measured from experiments on SCC girders conducted by the authors are used for numerical implementation and validation of the technique. Alternatively, interface slip is also evaluated by applying an analytical model which is based on first principles of mechanics. The values of interface slip computed by using the proposed technique are found to have close correlation with those of the analytical model. The effect of edge restraint on slip due to friction between steel and concrete is also studied.
The Effectiveness of Emergency Response System’s Service Providers for Road Accidents in Johor Bahru, Malaysia Mustaffa, A.A.; Kazunori, H.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (238.061 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.77-83

Abstract

In Malaysia, there are three core services involved in emergency, namely the fire and rescue, police, and ambulance services. The aim of the service providers is to prevent the loss of life and damage by improving their response time. The Civil Defence Department and the 999 call centre also assist the main providers. This paper aims to provide an overview of emergency response system (ERS) for road accidents in Johor Bahru. The objective is to find the effective services from ERS works. There are three sections of chronological events involved: the call centre receiving reports on accidents, at location of the accident and the time during which the victims are brought to the hospital. The paper studies the operation scheme of the ERS by describing the condition; to analyse the questionnaire using a set of questions on the ERS service; and to determine the effectiveness of the services provided. The provider’s services can be identified as a main factor in improving the ERS services provided in the study area.
Settlement Control of Soft Ground using Cement-Ricehusk Stabilization Chan, C-M.; Mokhtar, M.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (770.934 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.14.2.69-76

Abstract

Cement is widely used for improvement of soft soils, but financial and environmental concerns are causing genuine concerns to all parties, leading to the quest for alternative and effective stabilizers. Ricehusk is an agricultural waste in Malaysia, commonly disposed of by open burning or dumping in landfills. Considering that the ashes derived from ricehusk are pozzolanic in nature, there is a possibility that a cement-ricehusk mixture could effectively improve soft soils with reduced cement dosage. This study examines the mixture’s effectiveness by monitoring the settlement reduction in a clay soil. Standard oedometer tests were carried out on a soft marine clay sample admixed with cement-ricehusk. Test specimens contained 0-10% cement and 0-5% of ricehusk respectively, and were left to cure for either seven or 28 days. The stabilized specimens were observed to undergo significant reduction in compressibility, verifying the potential of cement-ricehusk as an alternative soft soil stabilizer.

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