cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013" : 8 Documents clear
The Optimization Model of Runway and Gate Assignment Nahry ,; Tjahjono, T.; Satiti, Y.J.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (799.358 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.129-136

Abstract

This paper is aimed to develop the optimization model of time slot utilization for both runway and apron gate of airport system. The model considers the objectives of airline company to minimize flight-taxiing-time and waiting-time for both landing and take-off. The optimization makes use of Network Representation (NR) in the form of two bipartite networks in order to transform the problem of runway and apron gate assignment into the network flow problem. Maximum Matching and Minimum Cost Flow on NR are the core of the model. An illustrative example is presented. The result shows that the model could increase both runway and apron gate capacities to as close as their theoretical capacities. Compared to the common practice which concerns only; the nearest available runway slot time, behind the scheduled time, and the nearest location of available gates to serve the flight, the model could reduce the total taxiing and waiting time.
Corrosion of Steel Reinforcements in Fly Ash- and Kaolin-based Geopolymer Concrete Immersed in Distilled Water and ASTM Seawater Astutiningsih, S.; Rustandi, A.; Noermalasari, D.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (375.54 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.89-95

Abstract

Corrosion behavior of steel bar in fly ash- and kaolin-based geopolymer concrete immersed in aggressive media of distilled water and ASTM seawater was compared to Portland cement concrete having similar mix design. An accelerated corrosion by applying 3 V potential on the steel bar was performed to obtain reasonable test results in a relatively short time. The potential and pH of the immersing media were measured from day 1 to day 10 and then plotted on Pourbaix diagram to predict passivation or corrosion state. At day 10, steel bar in Portland cement concrete were in corroded state both in distilled water and seawater. The best corrosion performance was for kaolin- based geopolymer concrete in which at day-10 the steel bar was passivated in both media. Steel bar in fly ash- based geopolymer concrete was passivated in distilled water but corroded in seawater.
Performance of Periwinkle Shell Ash Blended Cement Concrete Exposed to Magnesium Sulphate Umoh, A.A.; Olusola, K.O.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (276.548 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.96-101

Abstract

The study examined the compressive strength of periwinkle shell ash (PSA) blended cement concrete in magnesium sulphate medium. Specimens were prepared from designed characteristics strength of 25 MPa. The cement replacement with PSA ranged between 0 and 40% by volume. A total of 180 cube specimens were cast and cured in water. At 28 days curing, 45 specimens each were transferred into magnesium sulphate of 1%, 3%, and 5% solution, while others were continuously cured in water and tested at 62, 92, and 152 days. The results revealed a higher loss in compressive strength with the control mix, and that it increases with increased in MgSO4 concentration and exposure period, whereas, the attack on the PSA blended cement concrete was less and the least value recorded by 10% PSA content. Therefore, the study concluded that the optimum percentage replacement of cement with 10% PSA could mitigate magnesium sulphate attack.
Contractors Perceptions of Effects of Project Overhead Costs on Building Project Performance in South-South of Nigeria Ujene, A.O.; Idoro, G.I.; Odesola, I.A.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (306.332 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.102-113

Abstract

This study assesses 12 types of project overhead costs, 6 methods of allocation and 15 factors which affect project overhead costs in South-South of Nigeria. The objective is to compare small and medium contractors’ perception of the methods of allocation, factors affecting project overhead costs and the effect of the types of project overhead costs on cost, time and quality of the projects. Data were obtained through 501 structured questionnaires administered to small and medium contractors and analysed using mean item score, and Mann-Whitney U test. The results reveal that contractors perceive that supervision costs, cost of rework, equipment management costs, general field expenses, and temporary works costs were prominent overheads affecting cost, time, and quality performance of projects. There is no difference in the contractors’ perceptions of issues affecting overhead costs. It is recommended that contractors should give adequate priority to significant project overheads and their influencing factors.
The Effects of Water Content Variation on Adhesion Factor of Pile Foundation in Expansive Soil Tjandra, D.; Indarto, .; Soemitro, R.A.A.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (608.839 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.114-119

Abstract

Seasonal change causes variations in soil moisture content. On expansive soil, this condition influences soil moisture content in the active zone, which is approximately in five meters depth. The water content variation induces the changes in soil characteristics and these changes have an impact to adhesion factor of piles. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of water content variations on adhesion factor of piles. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted considering water content variations. A pile model made of concrete was penetrated to soil sample which was placed in a cylindrical tube of diameter about 15 times the diameter of the pile model. The pile model was loaded until failure to investigate the friction capacity. The results showed that the change of water content have great impact to adhesion factor of piles and its friction capacity decreased up to eight times from drying to wetting condition.
Evaluating Functional and Structural Condition Based Maintenances of Airfield Pavements Tarefder, R.; Ahmed, M.U.; Rahman, M.M.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (927.481 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.71-80

Abstract

This study evaluates airfield pavements’ functional- and structural-condition to determine the most economical maintenance method. As a part of the analysis, Pavement Condition Index (PCI) for several runways, taxiways, and aprons has been determined by MicroPAVER. Structural evaluation of airport pavements has been performed by Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) test. Evaluation of Layer Moduli and Overlay Design (ELMOD) also determines the required overlay thickness based on the E-values, i.e. FWD data analysis. Damage analysis determines the time of repeated overlay application. In addition, functional parameters have been included to determine the time of functional maintenance. Maintenance and rehabilitation alternatives have been selected to develop different program strategies. Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) has been performed to determine the maintenance cost. Structural condition based maintenance cost is compared to functional condition based maintenance cost. Comparison shows that structural condition based approach yields cheaper maintenance strategies than functional condition based maintenance approach.
Influence of Rainfall Patterns on the Instability of Slopes Muntohar, A.S.; Ikhsan, J.; Liao, H.J.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (657.952 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.120-128

Abstract

The assessment of rainstorm-induced shallow landslides is still a research topic of wide concern for scientists and engineers. This paper examined the effect of rainfall intensity distribution on shallow landslides. Four synthetic rainfall distributions comprising uniformed, delayed, centralized, and advanced, were selected to examine the effect of rainstorm patterns on slope failure. The infiltration was modeled using Green-Ampt equation, while an infinite slope was selected to model the shallow landslide. Monte Carlo Simulation was applied to analyze the failure probability of the slopes. Two landslide cases were selected to examine the proposed model. The results indicated that among the four representative rainstorm patterns, the advanced rainfall pattern caused worst slope stability. The advanced rainfall pattern resulted in the shortest rainfall duration threshold for landslide occurrence, followed by the central, uniform, and then delayed rainfall pattern. The probabilistic analysis method was suitable to estimate the time of failure for the evaluated landslide cases.
Seismic Behavior of Fatigue-Retrofitted Steel Frame Piers Kinoshita, K.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1257.737 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.15.2.81-88

Abstract

Fatigue retrofit works have been conducted on severely fatigue damaged beam-to-column connections of existing steel frame bridge piers in Japan. It is clear that retrofit works provides additional stiffness but the significance on the seismic behavior of steel frame piers is not clear. Since fatigue retrofit works have become prevalent, the effect of fatigue retrofit works on the seismic behavior of steel frame piers need to be understood. The objective of this study is therefore to investigate these effects of the retrofit work, especially installation of bolted splices, which is the most common technique. Elasto-plastic finite element earthquake response analyses were carried out. It is shown that the existence of bolted splices may increase seismic demand on the piers when plastic hinge zone is located on the beam. In addition, longer bolted splices using low yield strength steel are proposed to overcome this problem and are shown to give beneficial effects.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 8


Filter by Year

2013 2013


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol. 24 No. 1 (2022): MARCH 2022 Vol. 23 No. 2 (2021): SEPTEMBER 2021 Vol. 23 No. 1 (2021): MARCH 2021 Vol. 22 No. 2 (2020): SEPTEMBER 2020 Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020 Vol. 21 No. 2 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol. 21 No. 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol. 20 No. 2 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol. 20 No. 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol. 19 No. 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol. 18 No. 2 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol. 18 No. 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol. 17 No. 3 (2015): SPECIAL EDITION Vol. 17 No. 2 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol. 17 No. 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol. 16 No. 2 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol. 16 No. 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol. 15 No. 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol. 14 No. 3 (2012): Special Edition Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol. 14 No. 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol. 13 No. 2 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol. 13 No. 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol. 12 No. 2 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol. 12 No. 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol. 11 No. 2 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol. 10 No. 2 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol. 10 No. 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol. 9 No. 2 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol. 8 No. 2 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol. 8 No. 1 (2006): MARCH 2006 Vol. 7 No. 2 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol. 7 No. 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol. 6 No. 2 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol. 6 No. 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol. 5 No. 2 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol. 5 No. 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol. 4 No. 2 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol. 4 No. 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol. 3 No. 2 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol. 3 No. 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol. 2 No. 2 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol. 2 No. 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol. 1 No. 2 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol. 1 No. 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 More Issue