cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017" : 8 Documents clear
Effect of the Use of Metakaolin Artificial Lightweight Aggregate on the Properties of Structural Lightweight Concrete Puput Risdanareni; Afif Achsanul Choiri; Boedya Djatmika; Poppy Puspitasari
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (425.241 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.86-92

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of using metakaolin Artificial Lightweight Aggre­gates (ALWA) as a substitute for coarse aggregates to produce structural lightweight concrete. A combination of 10M NaOH solution and sodium silicate solution was used as alkali activator. The ratio between the metakaolin binder and the alkali activator used in producing metakaolin ALWA is 48%:52%, by mass. It is shown that metakaolin ALWA has higher abrasion and water absorption, and lower bulk density values compared to normal aggregates. To determine the effect of using metakaolin ALWA as coarse aggregates in concrete, three variations of ALWA dosages were used, i.e. 0%, 50%, and 100% of the total coarse aggregates, by volume. The results show that the compressive strength of concrete decreased along with the increase of ALWA content in the mixture. However, concrete using 100% ALWA as coarse aggregates meets the requirements of compressive strength and density of structural light weight concrete.
Crack Mapping on Shear-critical Reinforced Concrete Beams using an Open Source Digital Image Correlation Software Benny Suryanto; Asdam Tambusay; Priyo Suprobo
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (686.224 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.93-98

Abstract

Three reinforced concrete beams, one with no shear reinforcement and two others with shear reinforcement ratios of 0.4% and 1.1%, were tested to investigate the influence of stirrup spacing on the mode of failure, overall strength and ductility. The results show that the beam reinforced with closely-spaced shear reinforcement failed in a ductile manner, whereas the other two beams with large stirrup spacing and no stirrup exhibited only a small measure of ductility and failed in a brittle manner. The importance of the provisions of maximum spacing is highlighted to ensure adequate anchorage for the stirrups and prevent a premature shear failure to occur. The application of a non-contact monitoring system employing the open source digital image correlation software Ncorr, an ordinary digital camera and a smartphone is demonstrated to provide a visualization of the cracking process throughout the load history.
Spinning Induced Compression Strength of Precast Hollow Concrete Piles Gogot Setyo Budi; Suseno P.K.; Winata S.K.
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (411.606 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.99-104

Abstract

Prefabricated precast-hollow concrete pile is widely used as deep foundations due to its several benefits such as the uniformity in concrete quality and its durability. It is also called spun pile since the spinning method is utilized to compact the fresh concrete. During spinning, the fresh concrete is propelled outward due to centrifugal force, which generates a compaction process and develops a hollow in the center of the pile. Several factors, such as the rate of spinning, frequency, and duration of spinning, are affecting the quality of the pile. This paper presents the study of density and compressive strength of spun piles. The specimens were cored from the spun piles with diameter of 800 mm. The results show that the density and the compressive strength of the concrete at outer region of the spun pile are bigger than those at the inner side.
Managerial Skills for Managing Construction Safety Riza Yosia Sunindijo; Patrick X.W. Zou; Andrew Dainty
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (285.223 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.63-72

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that self-awareness, visioning, and sincerity are foundational managerial skills for delivering positive safety outcomes in construction projects. This paper aims to verify this finding and to suggest learning approaches for developing these skills in practice. Interviews with experienced construction practitioners were analysed thematically to find common themes. The thematic analysis confirms the necessity of the mana­gerial skills identified in the previous research for managing construction safety and provides directions for construction organisations to improve safety learning. Existing approaches, which mainly adopt the cognitivism learning philosophy, may not be sufficient because the nature of learning in practice aligns with social constructivism, showing that learning occurs informally through interactions with people and artefacts at work instead of in a classroom-structured environment. Furthermore, although learning methods to develop safety skills have been suggested, there remains a need for better statistical evidence of the effectiveness of these methods in delivering safety outcomes.
Compressive Strength of Post Fire Exposed Concrete Column Wrapped with Fiber Reinforced Polymer Dwi Agus Setiawan Wardaya; Handoko Sugiharto; Pamuda Pudjisuryadi
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (875.886 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.105-110

Abstract

In this study, behaviour of reinforced concrete columns strengthened using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP; glass fiber and carbon fiber) after fire exposure are discussed. After being exposed to fire as high as 720oC for 180 minutes, the specimens showed concrete and  reinforcement strength degradation, even though there was no carbonation. It was found that specimens wrapped by carbon fiber showed better compressive strength but less ductility compared to specimens wrapped by glass fiber. It was also found that the low initial compressive strength did not decrease FRP confinement effectiveness. Increase of wrapped concrete com­pressive strength was evident despite the low initial strength (<17 MPa). Strength esti­mation using ACI 440.2R-08 formula, which is originally for wrapped plain concrete without fire heat exposure, underestimated the compressive strength. In the proposed formula, the initial compressive strength (f’co) should be adjusted by considering the modulus elasticity and strain limitation to have more precise estimation.  
Combining Off-the-Job Productivity Regression Model with EPA’s NONROAD Model in Estimating CO2 Emissions from Bulldozer Apif M. Hajji; Aisyah Larasati; Michael P. Lewis
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (363.879 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.73-78

Abstract

Heavy duty diesel (HDD) construction equipment which includes bulldozer is important in infrastructure development. This equipment consumes large amount of diesel fuel and emits high level of carbon dioxide (CO2). The total emissions are dependent upon the fuel use, and the fuel use is dependent upon the productivity of the equipment. This paper proposes a methodology and tool for estimating CO2 emissions from bulldozer based on the productivity rate. The methodology is formulated by using the result of multiple linear regressions (MLR) of CAT’s data for obtaining the productivity model and combined with the EPA’s NONROAD model. The emission factors from NONROAD model were used to quantify the CO2 emissions. To display the function of the model, a case study and sensitivity analysis for a bulldozer’s activity is also presented. MLR results indicate that the productivity model generated from CAT’s data can be used as the basis for quantifying the total CO2 emissions for an earthwork activity.
Condition Assessment of the Deteriorated Reinforced Concrete Bridge Gunawan Budi Wijaya; Narciso Pacuribot
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1864.223 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.111-120

Abstract

A comprehensive assessment was conducted to an old reinforced concrete bridge in Brunei Darussalam. This bridge is about 30-40 years old, and has already shown signs of concrete distresses. The main concern was the integrity of the columns, beams and deck, as signs of concrete deteriorations were readily noticeable, e.g. cracks, delaminations, exposed rebar, and concrete spalling. Both visual inspection and non-destructive tests were performed on site. For more detail evaluation, concrete core samples were extracted and sent for testing. Based on information gathered during the investigation and the results of laboratory testing, the reviewed concrete columns were found in bad condition and required immediate repair. The main cause of this concrete distress was the reinforcement corrosion. The vertical column reinforcements were badly corroded and could not function as designed. Without initiating a repair program, it should be prepared for progressive deteriorating conditions, eventually leading to a structural at-risk scenario.
The Study of Liquefaction Time Stages due to a Short Duration Shaking Lindung Zalbuin Mase
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (548.31 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.19.2.79-85

Abstract

During the 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake, liquefactions were massively found in Opak River, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Learning from those events, an experimental study of liquefaction using shaking table was performed, especially to investigate the effect of short shaking duration to liquefaction potential.  Several experimental tests were performed under varied accelerations (0.3g, 0.35g, and 0.4g) and vibration frequencies (1.4 Hz, 1.6 Hz, and 1.8 Hz), with a short shaking duration of 8 seconds. The liquefaction parameter used in this study was the excess pore water pressure ratio. The results revealed that liquefaction occurs in every loading criteria and the short shaking duration applied on each loading influences time stages of liquefaction, i.e. the liquefaction duration, the initial time of liquefaction, and the initial time of pore water pressure dissipation. In addition, the dynamic loads applied in a short duration influenced the maximum excess pore water pressure ratio.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 8


Filter by Year

2017 2017


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol. 24 No. 1 (2022): MARCH 2022 Vol. 23 No. 2 (2021): SEPTEMBER 2021 Vol. 23 No. 1 (2021): MARCH 2021 Vol. 22 No. 2 (2020): SEPTEMBER 2020 Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020 Vol. 21 No. 2 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol. 21 No. 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol. 20 No. 2 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol. 20 No. 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol. 19 No. 2 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol. 19 No. 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol. 18 No. 2 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol. 18 No. 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol. 17 No. 3 (2015): SPECIAL EDITION Vol. 17 No. 2 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol. 17 No. 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol. 16 No. 2 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol. 16 No. 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol. 15 No. 2 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol. 15 No. 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol. 14 No. 3 (2012): Special Edition Vol. 14 No. 2 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol. 14 No. 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol. 13 No. 2 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol. 13 No. 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol. 12 No. 2 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol. 12 No. 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol. 11 No. 2 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol. 11 No. 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol. 10 No. 2 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol. 10 No. 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol. 9 No. 2 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol. 8 No. 2 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol. 8 No. 1 (2006): MARCH 2006 Vol. 7 No. 2 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol. 7 No. 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol. 6 No. 2 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol. 6 No. 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol. 5 No. 2 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol. 5 No. 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol. 4 No. 2 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol. 4 No. 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol. 3 No. 2 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol. 3 No. 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol. 2 No. 2 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol. 2 No. 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol. 1 No. 2 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol. 1 No. 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 More Issue