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INDONESIA
Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020" : 6 Documents clear
Towards Improving Performance of the Construction Industry in Ghana: A SWOT Approach Boadu Elijah Frimpong; Riza Yosia Sunindijo; Cynthia Wang
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (848.031 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.37-46

Abstract

The construction industry is the second largest contributor to GDP and a significant driver of economic activities in Ghana. Given the importance of the construction industry in boosting the national economy, it is essential to develop effective strategies to keep improving the performance of the industry. To achieve this aim, this research conducted the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the Ghanaian construction industry. Underpinned by the SWOT analysis, strategic recommendations are provided to minimise the weaknesses and neutralise the threats that confront the industry, while taking advantage of the strengths and exploiting the opportunities presented to it. These include investment to facilitate innovation and growth, human resource development, development and enforcement of policy and standards, and conducive procurement practice. The recommendations are expected to provide practical and theoretical directions to the industry’s stakeholders on effective ways to improve the industry’s performance.
Digital Image Correlation for Cement-based Materials and Structural Concrete Testing Asdam Tambusay; Benny Suryanto; Priyo Suprobo
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1103.664 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.6-12

Abstract

This paper presents the application of a low-cost digital image correlation (DIC) system for automated crack mapping. The system employed makes use of a conventional digital camera, a remote image recording controller, and an open-source digital image correlation MATLAB software Ncorr. To showcase the potential of the proposed system, two case studies involving general structural and material testing were undertaken. In the first series, the DIC system was used to study the fracture processes in a reinforced concrete beam and to investigate the influence of key input parameters on the spatial quality of strain maps obtained from the DIC analysis. In the second series, the application of the DIC method was expanded to assist in the study of complex multiple micro-crack formations in ductile cement composite testing. It is shown that the strain maps obtained from the DIC technique have a close resemblance to the actual crack patterns
Numerical Model for High Relative Capacity of Tensegrity Cable Domes Nacer LOGZIT; Khelifa KEBICHE
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.29-36

Abstract

The tensegrity cable domes are a type of structures composed of compressed bars and tensioned cables. They are characterized by an exceptional innovation in terms of lightness. Research in this area is booming towards multiple applications. In the absence of an approach linking design by dimensioning, this article aims to propose a procedure for verifying the design while seeking a better lightness of the structure. The article uses the novelty of the methods applied for this kind of structure, using the hypothesis of geometric nonlinearity, to find the best solution, verifying all the sizing criteria. Through an example of a simple cables dome, we have shown the feasibility of this approach. The shape of the triangles forming the basis of design, have a direct relationship on the relative capacity, this last has been significantly improved, This method can easily be applied to other examples of more complex cables domes.
Promoting Precipitation Technique using Bio-Chemical Grouting for Soil Liquefaction Prevention Heriansyah Putra; Hideaki Yasuhara; Naoki Kinoshita; Muhammad Fauzan
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.1-5

Abstract

The applicability of bio-chemical grouting as the environmentally friendly and economically method for liquefaction remediation was evaluated. Several combinations of organic and in-organic precipitations methods were conducted to obtain the optimum grouting solution. Organic precipitation method employs a bio-agent of urease enzyme to dissociate urea into ammonium and carbonate ions. The produced carbonate ions are precipitated as calcite crystals in the presence of calcium ions. Meanwhile, the in-organic methods were performed using chemical compounds only, without the bio-agent. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were performed to evaluate the applicability of the grouting solutions for improving the soil strength. Grouting solution is injected into the prepared sand samples. The sand samples with a relative density of 50% were treated with one and two PV for 3-day curing times. The experimental results showed that the organic precipitation method produced the high precipitated amount and resulted in the significant improvement in the strength of the treated sand. The presence of the precipitated materials within the grains of soil generated the strength of 272 kPa. The results of this study have elucidated that the organic precipitation method composed of calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, urea and enzyme of urease may be an alternative soil-improvement technique to prevent the liquefaction susceptibility.
Flexural Strength Behaviour of Apa (Afzeliabipindensis) Reinforced Stabilized Lateritic Soil Beam Philip Baki OZIGI; Lawrence Zahemen TULEUN; Alao Abdullahi JIMOH
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (631.396 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.22-28

Abstract

This paper reports on the flexural strength behaviour of Apa reinforced stabilized lateritic soil beams. The potential of using timber as a reinforcement material is because timber is abundant, cheap and locally available compared to conventional steel. Apa timber possess a tensile strength of 68.34 N/mm2. Experimental and Finite Element Analysis using ANSYS 15 were carried out to determine the flexural strength of Apa reinforced lateritic soil beams. The results showed an increase in the load-bearing capacity with increase in the percentage area of Apa reinforcement used in Lateritic soil beams. BS 8110-1:1997 requires that area of reinforcement for beams should not exceed 4%. At 4 percent area, the flexural strength of the Apa reinforced lateritic soil beams (ALB) was 0.763 N/mm2 with corresponding load capacity of 3.435 kN which is slightly higher than the steel reinforced lateritic soil beams (SLB) of 0.740 N/mm2 with corresponding load capacity of 3.329 kN obtained in the report
Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Using Rapid Visual Screening: Case Study of Educational Facility Buildings of Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Yanuar Haryanto; Hsuan-Teh Hu; Ay Lie Han; Banu Ardi Hidayat; Arnie Widyaningrum; Prisca Evelyn Yulianita
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 22 No. 1 (2020): MARCH 2020
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/ced.22.1.13-21

Abstract

Earthquakes are natural phenomena occurring in various parts of the globe. Severe earthquakes caused substantial loss of life and property when nearly populated districts. Although some progress has been made in the area of seismic prediction, earthquakes in time, magnitude or location can not be estimated correctly. The primary method of reducing casualties is therefore to build seismic resistant structures. Current earthquakes show that the old houses, which are not intended to withstand earthquakes, have been harmed rather than the structures intended according to seismic regulations. Many current structures in Indonesia were intended only without seismic provisions to withstand the gravity loads. There is a need to study these buildings' vulnerability in order to prevent a severe danger. A Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) technique is conducted in this study to determine a Final Level 1 Score, SL1, for Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia’s educational facility buildings. In nine constructions situated in Purwokerto and Purbalingga, the method was implemented. Moreover, the final SL1 score is an estimate of the collapse probability if an earthquake occurs with ground motions called the maximum considered earthquake targeted risk, MCER. These score estimates are based on restricted observed and analytical information, thus the probability of collapse is therefore an approximation.

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