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Civil Engineering Dimension
ISSN : 14109530     EISSN : 1979570X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
The Civil Engineering Dimension (Dimensi Teknik Sipil) is a refereed journal, published twice a year, in March and September.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007" : 8 Documents clear
Derivation Of Moving Least-Squares Approximation Shape Functions And Its Derivatives Using The Exponential Weight Function Effendy Tanojo
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (230.133 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 19-24

Abstract

In recent years, meshless methods have gained their popularity, mainly due to the fact that absolutely no elements are required to discretize the problem domain. This is possible due to the nature of the approximation functions used in this method. Approximation functions used to form the shape functions use only the so-called “nodal selection” procedure without the need of elements definition. The most popular approximation function used is the moving least-squares shape functions. Published works in meshless methods, however, present only the basic formulas of the moving least-squares shape functions. This paper presents the complete and detailed derivations of not only the moving least-squares shape functions, but also their derivatives (up to the second order derivatives), using the exponential weight function. The derivations are then programmed and verified.
Evaluation Of Finite Element Mesh Arrangements And Stress Intensity Factor Calculation Methods For Opening Mode Fracture Of Cracked-Cemented Materials Pontjo Utomo; Hamid R. Nikraz
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (823.049 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 25-32

Abstract

Fracture mechanics is a branch of mechanics, which deals with the cracked body. Every construction material that currently in use inevitably is not flawless. The pre-existing crack may grow to cause structure failure due to low stress, which acts to a structure. Stress intensity factor (K) is a single parameter in fracture mechanics, which can be used to examine if a crack, would propagate in a cracked structure under particular loading condition. Finite element method is used to analyze the cracked body to provide the displacements data around the crack tip (at quarter point elements) due to load prescribed, for stress intensity factor determination. Two methods of stress intensity factor calculation, Quarter Point Displacement Technique (QPDT) and Displacement Correlation Technique (DCT), were evaluated. A series of standard fracture testing were undertaken to provide the fracture load data (Pf), which coupled with the stress intensity factor analytical formula to calculate fracture toughness. The results showed that under a particular mesh arrangement, the result of finite element analysis could deviate from the analytical formula calculation result. The QPDT method is suitable for compact tension specimen but DCT seemed to be not. For cracked beam analysis, the QPDT and DCT calculations were in good agreement with the analytical formula as long as coupled with the appropriate mesh arrangement around the crack tip.
A Modal Pushover Analysis on Multi-Span Concrete Bridges to Estimate Inelastic Seismic Responses Ima Muljati; Pennung Warnitchai
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1039.014 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 33-41

Abstract

The performance of Modal Pushover Analysis (MPA) in predicting the inelastic seismic response of multi-span concrete bridges is investigated. The bridge is subjected to lateral forces distributed proportionally over the span of the bridge in accordance to the product of mass and displaced shape. The bridge is pushed up to the target displacement determined from the peak displacement of the nth mode inelastic Single Degree of Freedom System derived from Uncoupled Modal Response History Analysis (UMRHA). The peak response from each mode is combined using Square-Root of Sum-of-Square (SRSS) rule. Although the use of SRSS rule is not appropriate in this bridge and the displaced pattern is shifted from the elastic shape due to yielding, MPA can predict well the total peak response of the bridge in inelastic range.
Exploring Public Perception of Paratransit Service Using Binomial Logistic Regression Tri Basuki Joewono; Hisashi Kubota
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.61 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 1-8

Abstract

Knowledge of the market is a requirement for a successful provision of public transportation. This study aims to explore public perception of paratransit service, as represented by the user and non-user of paratransit. The analysis has been conducted based on the public’s response, by creating several binomial logistic regression models using the public perception of the quality of service, quality of car, quality of driver, and fare. These models illustrate the characteristics and important variables to establish whether the public will use more paratransit in the future once improvements will have been made. Moreover, several models are developed to explore public perception in order to find out whether they agree to the replacement of paratransit with other types of transportation modes. All models are well fitting. These models are able to explain the respondents’ characteristics and to reveal their actual perception of the operation of paratransit. This study provides a useful tool to know the market in greater depth.
Comparison Between 2-D and 3-D Stiffness Matrix Model Simulation of Sasw Inversion for Pavement Structure Sri Atmaja P. Rosidi
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (365.118 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 42-48

Abstract

The Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) method is a non-destructive in situ seismic technique used to assess and evaluate the material stiffness (dynamic elastic modulus) and thickness of pavement layers at low strains. These values can be used analytically to calculate load capacities in order to predict the performance of pavement system. The SASW method is based on the dispersion phenomena of Rayleigh waves in layered media. In order to get the actual shear wave velocities, 2-D and 3-D models are used in the simulation of the inversion process for best fitting between theoretical and empirical dispersion curves. The objective of this study is to simulate and compare the 2-D and 3-D model of SASW analysis in the construction of the theoretical dispersion curve for pavement structure evaluation. The result showed that the dispersion curve from the 3-D model was similar with the dispersion curve of the actual pavement profile compared to the 2-D model. The wave velocity profiles also showed that the 3-D model used in the SASW analysis is able to detect all the distinct layers of flexible pavement units.
The Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Soft Rock D. S. Agustawijaya
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (144.982 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 9-14

Abstract

Soft rock is a term that usually refers to a rock material with a uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) less than 20 MPa. This low strength range might be influenced by physical characteristics, such as size, saturation, weathering and mineral content. A number of uniaxial compression tests have been conducted onto soft rock samples. The results showed that the strength reduced significantly in saturation. The reduction was also caused by weathering, the strength of distinctly weathered rocks were lower than that of partially weathered rocks. In conjunction with the uniaxial compression test, point load strength index tests, IS(50), have also been conducted in order to obtain a correlation between the UCS and the point load strength index IS(50). The results showed that the IS(50) could well be correlated with the UCS. A conversion factor of 14 is proposed for soft rock materials.
Review and Recommendation of Cold Asphalt Emulsion Mixtures Caems Design I Nyoman Arya Thanaya
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.102 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 49-56

Abstract

Note from the Editor Cold Asphalt Emulsion Mixture (CAEM) is a mixture of aggregates and asphalt emulsion that is mixed at room temperature. It is relatively simple to produce, but the design procedure provided by the Asphalt Institute and the Ministry of Public Work of Indonesia pose some problems in its practical application. This Technical Note discusses limitations of the current design procedures and presents a simpler and more practicable design procedure
A Study of Compressive Strength Characteristics of Laterite Sand Hollow Blocks Olugbenga Ata; Kolapo Olusola; Oludare Omojola; Abiodun Olanipekun
Civil Engineering Dimension Vol. 9 No. 1 (2007): MARCH 2007
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (215.132 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/ced.9.1.pp. 15-18

Abstract

This paper presents the results of experimental investigations carried out on partial replacement of sand with laterite as it affects the compressive strength of sandcrete hollow blocks. Two mix proportions (1:6 and 1:8) were used with laterite content varying between 0 and 50% at 10% intervals. Hand and machine compaction methods were used. Curing was done by sprinkling water on the specimens. The results showed that for each mix proportion and compaction method, the compressive strength decreases with increase in laterite content. Machine compacted hollow sandcrete blocks made from mix ratio 1:6 and with up to 10% laterite content is found suitable and hence recommended for building construction having attained a 28-day compressive strength of 2.07N/mm2 as required by the Nigerian Standards.

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