cover
Contact Name
Made Adi Widyatmika
Contact Email
adi.widyatmika@unhi.ac.id
Phone
+62361-462486
Journal Mail Official
ijiis@unhi.ac.id
Editorial Address
Jalan Sangalangit Tembau, Denpasar Timur, Denpasar 80238, Bali
Location
Kota denpasar,
Bali
INDONESIA
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
ISSN : 26553538     EISSN : 26542706     DOI : 10.32795
IJIIS expects to publish articles that investigate, critically assess and foster intellectual exchanges at the theoretical, philosophical as well as applied levels of knowledge on interreligious and intercultural matters. Its main purpose is to generate scholarly exchanges of ideas, criticisms, and debates on the realities of religious life in a complex, multicultural world. IJIIS welcomes any original research articles, scientific essays, and book reviews that explore various avenues for religious cooperation, healthy interaction, and conversion, as well as multi-subjective forms of participation in religious rituals and cultural festivities. IJIIS is particularly interested in articles and essays, which specifically deal with the following topics: (1) Baliology, the science of Bali Hinduism, its interaction with other Indonesian religious traditions, local cultures, globalization, tourism industry, and others; (2) Hindu-Muslim studies in Indonesia, India and other parts of the world; (3) Religio-cultural diversity, norms and values in the context of a globalized and digitalized world; (4) Multi-, inter- and trans-disciplinary methodologies in examining religion and culture; (5) Secularism and secular worldview in a variety of religious and cultural-specific contexts.
Articles 70 Documents
Literary Projection of Nature and Environment in Abhijñāna-Śākuntalam: Reflection of Faith-Based Care for the Environment Bipin Kumar Jha; Abhishek Tripathi
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (440.434 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.689

Abstract

Abhijñāna Śākuntalam, as Sanskrit play by the renowned poet Kālidāsa offers the utmost importance to nature and the environment. It is the responsibility of all and everyone, irrespective of their social strata; king, sages, their sons and daughter and their disciples’ given equal responsibility and accountability to care for the environment. The king is advised not to kill the animals roaming inside a guarded territory of the Āśrama (cottage) of the sages. Śakuntalā was advised by her father Kaṇva to look after the plants and animals. The reciprocal nature of mutual dependence between Human and Environment vividly delved in Abhijñāna Śākuntalam. The King’s major responsibility includes preserving environment, one such example; the text eludes King Duṣyanta, taming a mad elephant, destroying the plants, while the king introduces himself to the Śakuntalā the very first time, another example is, the opening statement in Abhijñāna Śākuntalam reflects the concern of environment protection, the very importance of the people who care and nurture environment and have describes as: Yāsṛṣṭiḥsraṣṭurādyā vahatividhihutaṃ yāhaviryā ca hotrī, Ye Dvekālaṃ vidhattaḥ śrūtiviṣaya guṇā yā sthitā vyāpyaviśvam, Yām āhuḥ sarvabīja-prakṛtiriti yayā prāṇinaḥ prāṇavantaḥ, Pratyakṣābhiḥ prapannastanubhiravatuvastābhiraṣṭābhirīśaḥ [A.S 1.1]. Eight forms has Shiva, Lord of all and king: And these are water, first created thing; And fire, which speeds the sacrifice begun; those who care for nature; and time’s dividers, moon and sun; The all-embracing ether, path of sound; The earth, wherein all seeds of life are found; And air, the breath of life: may he draws near, Revealed in these, and bless those gathered here (Ryder,1999). The eight elements described in Abhijñāna Śākuntalam viz; the five gross elements along with time and space, and the people in general who care for nature are considered to be the constituents of god or Shiva. The environment and nature treated here as one entity represented here as, Lord Shiva, one of the trinities of Hindu god, shows the reflection of faith in relation to the care for the environment
Legal Politics of Interreligious Relations within the Pluralism Framework in Indonesia I Putu Sastra Wibawa
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (365.539 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.687

Abstract

Religious diversity contributes to nation building positively. However, it can also be a potential source of conflict. The multi-religious communities in Indonesia face many conflicts that triggered by religion. This problem demands a strategic anticipation, especially in juridical view. Juridical anticipation means the state frames legal policies that regulate the relations between religious communities in Indonesia in order to achieve a harmonious life. The political law of interreligious harmony established by the government in Indonesia will unable to implement properly if indirectly intervene by the community. The public must keep discussing and seeking to maintain inclusive relations between religious communities to achieve religious harmony in Indonesia which is based on tolerance and cooperation in the life of society, nation and state.
Dialogue of Christian Eco-Theology with Hindu Cosmology in the Disruption Era Daniel Syafaat Siahaan
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (375.127 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.686

Abstract

Global citizens of the world are entering a new era, the era of disruption. Terminologically, disruption means the era of chaos or the era of the disturbance. In the Indonesian dictionary, disruption is interpreted as being uprooted from the root. In the era of disruption, nothing is certain and established. The rapid development of information technology has a big influence on this era. This causes the level of local and global competition and competition among individuals or even countries becomes a necessity. Recently the situation of the Americans and Iran has heated up. Indonesia and China also. In a competition, superior-inferior relations become necessary. In such situations, the preservation of nature becomes the most easily ignored, or even sacrificed. For a moment, in competition between individuals or between countries to prove their superiority, nature became the most powerless and inferior. If the balance of nature is disturbed, the most disadvantaged are humans as well as animals. Forest and land fires in Australia are conclusive evidence. When nature is disturbed, humans and animals are the first victims to feel the loss. This issue is the background of the writing of this research. This research seeks to elaborate on the Christian eco-theology notion and to dialogue it with the Hindu cosmology notion. The method used is qualitative research with a comparative study approach. This research is expected to contribute ideas and also enriching the Christian eco-theological dialogue with Hindu cosmology in the era of disruption, in particular concerning the environment.
Fangsheng (放生) and Its Critical Discourse on Environmental Ethics in Buddhist Media Latifah Latifah; Ary Budiyanto
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (603.377 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.684

Abstract

Religious views of a community group are very influential in determining their attitudes and behavior towards nature and the environment. On the one hand, there is a worldview correlation that affects attitudes that are less friendly to nature as well as human superiority among other creatures that makes it feel entitled to exploit nature. On the other hand, religious views are also a motivation for caring for and loving nature, as is the will of Buddhists to create happiness for all living things. Reflections on choosing a moderate way of life prevent greed that can cause damage to nature so that sustainable development can be realized. The media, especially digital media, represents the implementation of Buddhist environmental ethics in a variety of writing frames. This study aims to look at Fangshen (放生) ritual in critical discourse on environmental ethics perspective as represented in Indonesian Buddhist media such as Buddhazine, Kompasiana, Tionghoa.info, and etcetera. This research shows that the discourse on environmental ethics in Buddhist media is at the point of intersection between natural disasters as a result of karma (kamma), paramita funds to change karma, responsibility for protecting nature, and compassion for all beings.
Intercultural Transfer and Balinese Gamelan Preservation Emma Lo
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (441.097 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.682

Abstract

The influence and spread of traditional Balinese music over time and across regions has been conducted through a number of different channels. In addition to locally-focused efforts, cultural transfer has also contributed to the preservation of traditional Balinese arts. From the self-interested, strategic support of gamelan music by Japanese occupational forces to the global experimental music scene today, Balinese arts have been shared, supported, translated, and appropriated in various ways by a number of different actors to political, artistic, and commercial ends. Building on Michel Espagne’s definition of cultural transfer and Stephen Greenblatt’s concept of cultural mobility, this paper aims to outline different modes of cultural transfer (or “bridges,” as Espagne would say), with explicit attention to power dynamics and multi-way flows of influence. Several key historical and contemporary examples of the transfer of traditional Balinese music will be discussed in an effort to better understand the relationship between cultural transfer and preservation.
Ecological Virtue: Articulating Tolerance as a Mutual-Respect Between Human Being and Environment Muhammad Nur Prabowo Setyabudi
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (368.628 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.683

Abstract

This paper elaborates the meaning of eco-tolerance in the context of ecological community between human and environment. Tolerance is often discussed as theological conception related to the relationship between religion (religious virtue) or socio-political conception related to the relationship between community or identity (political virtue). But how to build a tolerant relationship between human and their environment? What kind of wisdom that we need? I discuss about tolerance as an ecological wisdom or, “ecological virtue”, and a need for human to become a moral subject who has an ecological insight. I will elaborate ethical arguments from the perspective of virtue ethics, one of important disciplines in normative ethics, and environmental ethics, the most important branch in applied ethics, which describe that humans really need to have a mindset of ecocentric oriented, be wise and respectful toward the nature and the environment, build a mutual respect relationship, tolerance is not only a main value in political community, but also a main value in ecological community in a mutual respect ecosystem atmosphere and the existence of mutual recognition between human and nature.
State and Society: Indigenous Practices in Ritual and Religious Activities of Bali Hinduism in Bali-Indonesia I Ketut Ardhana
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (633.576 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.681

Abstract

Due to the increased tourism development in Bali, there have been significant changes in Balinese views in the practices of their ritual and religious lives. Previously populated almost exclusively by Hindu Balinese, Bali has evolved to be a multicultural society resulting from the increased migration of people, ethnicities and ideas. In the past, any ritual and religious activities in accordance with the humanistic religious management had been carried out in the traditional kingdoms. However, the downfall of those traditional kingdoms has affected the emergence of significant issues in relation to who will be in charge in the ritual and religious activities that demand much financial outlay. This has brought about important issues in relation to the decrease in the Balinese who adhere to Hinduism, since most of them have no time to arrange these kinds of activities as most work in the tourist sector that demands effectiveness and efficiency. There are many questions to be discussed in this paper, namely, Firstly: What is the role of the state and society in the management of the ritual and religious activities in Bali? Secondly: What kinds of alternative solutions can solve the problems? And, Thirdly: How can these issues faced by the Balinese, be managed, since the Balinese do not only consist of followers of the Hindu religion but also other religions such as Islam, Christianity (Protestant and Catholic), Buddhism and Confucianism as well as the local beliefs that have been recognized by the state in the Reform period since 1998? Through answering these questions, it is expected to have a better understanding of the role of the state and society in the context of indigenous practices in Ritual and Religious Activities of Bali Hinduism in Indonesia.
Rubbish, Recycling and Religion: Indonesia’s Plastic Waste Crisis and the Case of Rumah Kompos in Ubud, Bali Michael S. Northcoot
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2020): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (415.76 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol3.iss1.2020.680

Abstract

Indonesia is the second largest global source of marine plastic after China. Plastic waste, together with toxic smoke from extensive unregulated rubbish burning in homes and businesses, are grave public health threats in Indonesia. This paper presents a case study in Ubud, Bali of a community-based recycling and waste sorting project - Rumah Kompos –which demonstrates the potential of religious wisdom and belief to contribute to help solve Indonesia’s waste problem. The cultural role of religions in the case study is part of a larger Indonesian, and world religions, phenomenon in which churches, mosques and temples, and faith-based schools (and in Indonesia Islamic boarding schools or pesantren) have made efforts to sponsor pro-environmental behaviours at local community level. The paper also recalls the relevance of anthropological studies of religion, especially Mary Douglas’ classic study Purity and Danger, in understanding the connected genealogies of waste and religion. Douglas theorises that identification and regulation of hazardous and ‘polluting’ practices, concerning bodily fluids, food, clothing, housing, habitable land, potable water and sexual relationships was central to the social role of traditional religions. The disturbance to this long-established function of religion occasioned by the speed and scale of adoption of modern technological innovations, and of a modern ‘consumer lifestyle’, points to an under-studied dialectic between religion and waste which, in a nation as religiously active as Indonesia, ought to be included in both the conceptualisation of, and policy-making concerning, plastic and waste management.
Predicament of Knowledge Society: An Inquiry Gurudutta P. Japee
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 2 No 2 (2019): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (392.637 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol2.iss2.2019.455

Abstract

This study sets out to establish conceptual demarcations, more concordant to the theoretical acquisition with regard to the knowledge society. The knowledge society is a form of society in which members are examining ideas constantly. In Knowledge society there ought to be communicative rationality, wherein, arguments and receptive audiences are very important. The communicative phenomena in the knowledge society, knowledge should be participatory. This will occur only when society is knowledgeable and should have the potency to think, participate and respond critically. This type of knowledge domain will go beyond information because mere information is not knowledge, it requires Understanding and perception, imaginative framework, communicative and creative framework than only knowledge society would function and humanities (Human approach- when men are at the center of inquiry and inquiry must be human-centric) must be its hardcore. A society having equalitarian justice, the question of empowerment will not arise; this will create equal potency of freedom and capacity to respond. and can have healthy communication. It would be a dialoguing society, wherein negotiation will never seize.A society without a Motivational crisis, the Rationality crisis and the Legitimacy crisis can become knowledge society provided they have a sharable life world, which would respect alternative ways of thinking and it would be communicative. Virtues like empathy, compassion, etc must be at the center of the knowledge society. There should be the absence of dark emotions (sadness, suffering, anxiety, envy, boredom, loneliness, guilt, anger) in the knowledge society. Moreover, this entire phenomenon is not possible without nudging by the authority keeping libertarian paternalism and choice architecture.
The Interface between Religion and Politics in The Philippines Based on Data from Recent Philippine Elections Nestor T Castro
International Journal of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies Vol 2 No 2 (2019): Interreligious and Intercultural Studies
Publisher : UNHI PRESS

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (354.766 KB) | DOI: 10.32795/ijiis.vol2.iss2.2019.454

Abstract

The Philippines held its national elections last May 2019. During the election campaign, several religious groups organized electoral slates or supported particular political candidates. Among these groups were the Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) with its Alagad Party, the Jesus is Lord (JIL) Movement with its CIBAC Party, the El Shaddai with its Buhay Party, and the Kingdom of Jesus Christ which supported all of the candidates backed by the Duterte government. On the other hand, the dominant Roman Catholic Church did not support any political party or candidate as a bloc but emphasized the need for the electorate to use their conscience and vote wisely. Some Roman Catholic priests, however, openly supported the opposition Otso Diretso slate for the Senate.This paper looks at the interesting link between religion and politics in the Philippines, especially in its recent political history, i.e. from 1986 up to the present. In particular, this paper will attempt to answer the following questions: What role do the various religious groups in the Philippines play in the field of the political arena? Do Filipinos vote based on their religious affiliation?