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Contact Name
Muhammad Alif K. Sahide
Contact Email
alif.mksr@gmail.com
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Location
Kota makassar,
Sulawesi selatan
INDONESIA
Forest and Society
Published by Universitas Hasanuddin
ISSN : 25494724     EISSN : 25494333     DOI : -
Core Subject : Agriculture, Social,
Forest and Society is an international and interdisciplinary journal, which publishes peer-reviewed social, political and economic research relating to people, land, and forests. Forest and Society has main geographic focus on Southeast Asia but we do not limit research possibilities that compare between and across regions.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER" : 7 Documents clear
Improving food security? Setting indicators and observing change of rural household in Central Sulawesi Dewi Nur Asih; Stephan Klasen
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (630.296 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.2099

Abstract

Household food security is a critical issue for Indonesia, which is investigated in this study. Many of rural household in Indonesia depends on agricultural sectors and facing challenges of global warming that threatening food security and poverty alleviation in the country. We use panel data at the household level for a sample of households living in Central Sulawesi at the rainforest margin in Indonesia. For the purpose of this study, we apply principal component analysis to develop an indicator of food security and used the index in determining the household’s condition to be persistent food secure or insecure. The findings present the fact that over the period the household’s food security in the study area has changed to better food condition. The number of people who are food insecure has declined by 23.73 % over the year. However, the results suggest that public services on health, education and infrastructure need to be strengthened, investments in access to credit and off-farm employment policies, as well as insurance programs on social protection and disaster management, need to be developed.
Forestry, illegibility and illegality in Omkoi, Northwest Thailand Bobby Anderson; Patamawadee Jongruck
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (350.521 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.2809

Abstract

Opium poppy cultivation in Thailand fell from 12,112 hectares in 1961 to 281 ha in 2015. One outlier exists: Chiang Mai province’s remote southwestern district, Omkoi. 90% of the district is a national forest reserve where human habitation is illegal. However, an ethnic Karen population has lived there since long before the law that outlawed them was created, unconnected to the state by road, with limited or no access to health, education and other services: they cultivate the majority of Thailand’s known opium poppy, because they have little other choice. They increasingly rely on cash-based markets, their lack of citizenship precludes them from land tenure which might incentivize them to grow alternate crops, and their statelessness precludes them from services and protections. Nor is the Thai state the singular Leviathan that states are often assumed to be; it is a collection of networks with divergent interests, of whom one of the most powerful, the Royal Forestry Department, has purposely made Omkoi’s population illegible to the state, and has consistently blocked the attempts of other state actors to complexify this state space beyond the simplicity of its forest. These factors make short-term, high-yield, high value, imperishable opium the most logical economic choice for poor Karen farmers residing in this “non-state” space.
Forest, water and people: The roles and limits of mediation in transforming watershed conflict in Northern Thailand Ahmad Dhiaulhaq; Kanchana Wiset; Rawee Thaworn; Seth Kane; David Gritten
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (916.002 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.2049

Abstract

This study focuses on watershed management in Northern Thailand, where conflict over forest, land and water-use is a prevailing problem. A characteristic of watershed conflicts is that they are often multifaceted and involve multiple stakeholders with different interests and values, consequently requiring conflict management approaches that are sustainable in their outcomes, including addressing the underlying causes of the conflicts. Drawing from a case study in Mae Tia Mae Tae watershed in Northern Thailand, this study explores how mediation by external third party can contribute to the transformation of conflicts in the watershed and how the broader institutional contexts in which the conflict is embedded shapes the mediation outcomes. The study suggests that co-creation of mutual understanding and recognition of each party’s socio-cultural differences, including land-use practices, are critical in building trust and in how conflict transformation processes moved forward. Moreover, the ability of the mediator in facilitating the establishment of a deliberative institution (i.e. a watershed network committee) and agreed rules on forest utilization were also critical in maintaining long-term collaboration in the watershed and potentially preventing other conflicts arising in the future. Some issues, however, may threaten the continuity of the cooperation and sustainability of peace in the watershed, including the lack of structural reform that formally recognizes local people’s rights, insecure land tenure, and the absence of legal recognition for the watershed network committee as a legitimate mechanism for watershed decision making. The paper discusses these findings by comparing it with those from our previous studies in other locations (Cambodia, Indonesia and Western Thailand) to strengthen the insights from Northern Thailand. Finally, the research puts forward some recommendations for reforms and to strengthen the use of effective mediation, to achieve transformative outcomes, in conflicts of this nature. iation, to achieve transformative outcomes, in conflicts of this nature. 
Gaps in the thread: Disease, production, and opportunity in the failing silk industry of South Sulawesi Sitti Nuraeni
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (421.173 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.1861

Abstract

Indonesian silk farming (Sericulture) has experienced two waves of a pebrine epidemic (also known as pepper disease) and grasserie. The first pebrine epidemic occurred in 1973 and the second one occurred in 2010. Natural silk production in Indonesia has undergone dramatic decline after these epidemics. In addition to the disease, other factors also simultaneously contributed to the decline. This research examines the conditions and challenges to national natural silk industry recovery after a pebrine epidemic. The present study employs a survey and focus group discussion in three regencies (Wajo, Soppeng, and Enrekang), which took place in September 2016. Findings show that there are three major factors which contribute to the decline of national silk production, namely the: i) epidemic of silkworm disease, ii) quality of silkworms and the process of silkworm provision, iii) insufficiency of farmer means of production, and iv) lack of guidance and assistance for the farmers. Without interventions and greater support to properly maintain silkworm operations a potentially lucrative economy for rural farmers could go unrealized. The implications of this research also highlight key potential interventions for working with communities and supporting the overall resilience of national silk production in Indonesia.
Social Forestry - why and for whom? A comparison of policies in Vietnam and Indonesia Moira Moeliono; Pham Thu Thuy; Indah Waty Bong; Grace Yee Wong; Maria Brockhaus
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (485.635 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.2484

Abstract

Community forestry or social forestry (henceforth referred collectively as SF) programs have become new modes of forest management empowering local managers and hence, allowing integration of diverse local practices and support of local livelihoods.  Implementation of these initiatives, however, face multiple challenges. State-prescribed community programs, for example, will remain isolated efforts if changes in the overall economic and social governance frameworks, including the devolution of rights to local users is lacking. Financial sustainability of these measures remains often uncertain and equity issues inherent to groups and communities formed for SF, can be exacerbated. In this article, we pose the question: Whose interests do SF policies serve? The effectiveness of SF would depend on the motivations and aims for a decentralization of forest governance to the community. In order to understand the underlying motivations behind the governments’ push for SF, we examine national policies in Vietnam and Indonesia, changes in their policies over time and the shift in discourses influencing how SF has evolved. Vietnam and Indonesia are at different sides of the spectrum in democratic ambitions and forest abundance, and present an intriguing comparison in the recent regional push towards SF in Southeast Asia.  We discuss the different interpretations of SF in these two countries and how SF programs are implemented. Our results show that governments, influenced by global discourse, are attempting to regulate SF through formal definitions and regulations.  Communities on the other hand, might resist by adopting, adapting or rejecting formal schemes.  In this tension, SF, in general adopted to serve the interest of local people, in practice SF has not fulfilled its promise.
Bound by debt: Nutmeg trees and changing relations between farmers and agents in a Moluccan agroforestry systems Messalina Lovenia Salampessy; Indra Gumay Febryano; Dini Zulfiani
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (363.795 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.1718

Abstract

Agroforestry is a land management system long practiced by communities in the Moluccas. The practice is commonly known as "Dusung", where one cash crop in particular, nutmeg, is interspersed throughout farmer groves. Farmers have faced a number of challenges in recent years, especially concerning a system of debt bondage inflicting undue losses upon them. This study aims to explain the involvement of farmers within the debt bondage system, otherwise known as the tree mortgage system. We utilize a case study methodology, whereby data were collected through interviews and participant observation and results analyzed using principal agent theory. Findings highlight that nutmeg farmers, what we call the Principal, incur high risks when debt bondage is applied by an Agent that has the increasing ability to deny and change the terms of an agreement. This occurs when Agents exploit information unavailable to farmers about nutmeg marketing prospects, which weakens farmer negotiating positions. Improving institutional support for contracts in the tree mortgage system could help to ensure a more equitable arrangement, improving the terms for nutmeg farmers, meanwhile also encouraging the continued preservation of the dusung system, which has long helped to manage forest resources sustainably.
Mysterious ginger: Enclaves of a boom crop in Thailand Sukanlaya Choenkwan
Forest and Society Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (924.148 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v1i2.2117

Abstract

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a perennial herb revered as one of the most popular and valued spices of the world. Ginger is the main cash crop supporting the livelihood and improving the economic level of many ginger growers of India, Indonesia, Nigeria and Bangladesh. Although Thailand was the fifth highest ginger producing country in the world, documentation and general recorded information on ginger cultivation, both for domestic production and export value trade, is very limited. The ginger production system is also confounding. Moreover, ginger in Thailand has received little attention from researchers. There is no research or publications about Thai production of ginger and ginger farmers in both Thai and English publications. This paper is an initial attempt to establish a ginger story in Thailand by using the Plaba sub-district in Loei province as a case study to document this overlooked story and bring attention from researchers or government officials who are interested in the possibility of identifying new agriculture possibilities and recognize potential crops for further development to support rural livelihoods.

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