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Muhammad Alif K. Sahide
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INDONESIA
Forest and Society
Published by Universitas Hasanuddin
ISSN : 25494724     EISSN : 25494333     DOI : -
Core Subject : Agriculture, Social,
Forest and Society is an international and interdisciplinary journal, which publishes peer-reviewed social, political and economic research relating to people, land, and forests. Forest and Society has main geographic focus on Southeast Asia but we do not limit research possibilities that compare between and across regions.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 13 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL" : 13 Documents clear
What is success? Gaps and trade-offs in assessing the performance of traditional social forestry systems in Indonesia Indah Waty Bong; Moira Moeliono; Grace Yee Wong; Maria Brockhaus
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (819.116 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.5184

Abstract

Despite the growing interest in social forestry (SF), how much do we understand the social, economic and environmental outcomes and the conditions that enable SF to perform? In this article, we use a content analysis of literature on existing traditional SF practiced throughout Indonesia. It examines the outcomes of these systems and the conditions that enabled or hindered these outcomes to understand possible causal relations and changing dynamics between these conditions and SF performance. We discuss the gaps in how SF is assessed and understood in the literature to understand the important aspects of traditional SF that are not captured or that are lost when the diverse traditional systems are converted into other land uses. It aims to understand the potential trade-offs in the State’s push for formalizing SF if these aspects continue to be ignored.
Examining forest economies: A case study of silk value chain analysis in Wajo District Andi Gunawan Pratama; Supratman Supratman; Makkarennu Makkarennu
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (536.288 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.4912

Abstract

Value chain analysis is a strategic analytical tool for understanding activities that represent the value of a product (or service), meanwhile providing opportunities for identifying competitive advantage. In this value chain analysis, the research aims to 1) map the actors of silk commodity business ventures, 2) determine the activities of these business actors, and 3) calculate and analyze financial ratios. This study was conducted in the Wajo District as a site historically well known for silk production, and which is undergoing efforts at revival. The method used in this study is observation, interview, and modeling. Data analysis was conducted as a classical value chain analysis, emphasizing the calculations of financial ratios. The results show that the main actors and activities in commodities trading are farmers, local traders, weavers, and silk clothing stores. The largest marketing margin is approximately IDR. 300,000, which is found in silk clothing stores. On the other hand, the smallest marketing margins amounted to about IDR. 100,000, which were identified among local traders. Finally, the largest profit margins were identified among farmers valued at IDR. 196,000, while the smallest profit margins were among local traders amounting to IDR. 68,000. Overall, this case study highlights that forest enterprises, in this case of the silk industry in Wajo, can improve household incomes for forest farmers, while maintaining their overall bargaining position against the market.
A reflection of Social Forestry in 2019: Towards inclusive and collaborative government approaches Didik Suharjito; Christine Wulandari
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (422.999 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.6099

Abstract

In this policy forum, we seek to engage in a discussion related to the acceleration of social forestry approaches, foremost led by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MOEF), and supported by civil society actors. This article thus points to three key areas of reflection being raised among forums at different governing scales at the end of 2018. The first is a reflection of the national level issues discussed in a forum convened by MOEF in partnership with the media organization Tempo Magazine. The second is part of a reflection on a forum conducted by the Lampung province, which was convened by a coalition of NGOs. Finally, the third forum for reflection involved a public consultation about a study on the impacts of social forestry in South Sulawesi. These three forums highlighted that there is a sharp increase in formal social forestry designations by bureaucratically requiring regions to submit proposals, which are then followed up by verification of sites. This has resulted in a large increase in the number of social forestry permits and has also had the consequence of opening up bureaucratic access (in this case by MOEF) to civil society organizations in more inclusive and collaborative ways. However, on the other hand, we also found that amidst these discussions, there was also a strong element of recentralization emerging in the forestry sector related to permits, in which decision-making powers were being redirected to the central government. Another finding that emerged involves the weakening of capacity among communities themselves to benefit from social forestry designations. Therefore, although there are indications of positive engagement by government towards the principles of collaboration, concerns also emerge about the ways community engagement is unfolding. Overall, this highlights important considerations for improving social forestry policy and implementation for the future.
Institutional Sustainability of a Community Conservation Agreement in Lore Lindu National Park Sudirman Daeng Massiri; Bramasto Nugroho; Hariadi Kartodihardjo; Rinekso Soekmadi
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (560.869 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.5204

Abstract

The arrangement of self-governance institutions is the main obstacle to achieving sustainability for ecosystems and local livelihoods. The aim of this study was to describe the institutional sustainability of Community Conservation Agreement (CCA) in Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP), located in Central Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. This study applied a descriptive method by identifying and analyzing the relationship between characteristics of the community and nearby resources, as well as the regulations and rules (formal and local rules arranged in CCA), behavior and performance of institutional CCA, and the interests and power of stakeholders. The research demonstrates that high institutional sustainability of CCA is not only determined by the relations among the community, but that it is also motivated by the common interests to preserve water in the LLNP area as a means for avoiding disaster. However, principles of collective-choice arrangements, minimal recognition of rights to organize, and nested enterprises in CCA were not running well. Strategies to improve the institutional sustainability of CCA include unifying landscape zones that describe property rights of local communities within a conservation area that is recognized by all stakeholders and should be supported by formal legal rules.
The Manokwari Declaration: Challenges ahead in conserving 70% of Tanah Papua’s forests Rodrigo Cámara-Leret; Yance de Fretes; Edwin Scholes; Timothy G. Laman; Patrick Roehrdanz; Lee Hannah; Jonathan McLeod; Larry A. Fisher; Richard Deverell; Gemma Bramley; Timothy Utteridge; Andre Schuiteman; Charlie Heatubun
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (554.738 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.6067

Abstract

The Manokwari Declaration is an unprecedented pledge by the governors of Indonesia’s two New Guinea provinces to promote conservation and become SE Asia’s new Costa Rica. This is an exciting, yet challenging endeavour that will require working on many fronts that transcend single disciplines. Because Indonesian New Guinea has the largest expanse of intact forests in SE Asia, large-scale conservation pledges like the Manokwari Declaration will have a global impact on biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation.
Community preferences for social forestry facilitation programming in Lampung, Indonesia Christine Wulandari; Heni Kurniasih
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (793.351 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.6026

Abstract

A number of studies have discussed the importance of facilitation for improving the outcomes of Social Forestry programs. However, more detailed studies about the SF stakeholders should be prioritized, particularly those related to the types of facilitation among those that work with community forest user groups. This paper aims to fill this gap by analyzing community perspectives on who should be prioritized to receive facilitation and what type of facilitation is needed. We conduct the study in Lampung Province in 2017, focusing on Community Forestry (Hutan Kemasyarakatan/HKm), one of the first social forestry schemes implemented by the Indonesian Government. Based on an analysis of Analytic Hierarchy Process, this paper found that HKm participants have identified three top priorities for facilitation: individual members, community forestry groups, and other villagers (non-members of community forestry groups). Nevertheless, communities still see the importance of facilitation for external facilitators and government staff. The Analytic Hierarchy Process also shows that the most preferable type of facilitation for communities is based on entrepreneurship. These are particularly important for SF groups that have been established for more than ten years. This finding contrasts with previous studies arguing that the most needed facilitation in SF is strengthening community institutions.
Connecting social forestry to conservation policies in Tanah Papua Sepus M. Fatem
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.5865

Abstract

Papua is the region with the largest remaining forest resources in Indonesia. This amounts to 42,224,840 hectares of forest areas, which in other words means that 95% of its total area is listed as forests. The breadth of forest coverage is formalized by Forestry Ministerial Decree of Indonesia no. 891/Kpts-II/1999 on the Designation of Provincial Forest Area and Inland Waters in Tanah Papua. Meanwhile, forest resources plays an important part of people’s lives in Tanah Papua and holds an important function among customary communities in Papua. Nevertheless, as yet there has been no meaningful social forestry program that provides direct benefits to communities. As a response to the special autonomy of Papua, several initiatives aimed at providing formal access and support services to local people in forest resource management. Ironically however, such initiatives are discouraged by the central government, arguing that they should originate from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. Despite these circumstances, Tambrauw and West Papua have declared themselves to be a conservation district and conservation province, respectively. This article attempts to briefly portray the dynamics of these conservation initiatives and the possibilities of developing synergy with social forestry programming in Tambrauw District and West Papua Province.
Identifying the determining factors of recreation demand in Kongar Lake of South Sumatera: An individual travel cost approach Suhel Suhel; Abdul Bashir; Saadah Yuliana
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (641.557 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.5982

Abstract

Assessing the economic value of natural resources is always challenging and depends on various perspectives. Specifically, this study seeks to identify the determining factors of recreation demand regarding the Kongar Lake of South Sumatera. The data was obtained from a survey of 150 individuals who visited the lake. The approach used descriptive statistics and an individual travel cost method (ITCM) to conduct the investigation of distributional effects across variables on the number of visitors by using a linear multiple regression approach with a natural logarithm model. The findings suggest that (i) joint recreation demand is influenced by travel costs, income, distance, education, age, and work hours per day; (ii) in part the results of this study show that determining factors of recreation demand are based on travel cost, distance, and education; (iii) the consumer surplus was IDR.16,912 per visit and the annual recreational value included 1,720 people who visited the lake annually over an area of 5,298,288 per ha. The results of this study reveal that Kongar Lake has a considerable recreational value that, from this point of view, can help policymakers to make the case for preservation planning and sustainable utilization of natural resources.
Mainstreaming community-based forest management in West Sumatra: Social forestry arguments, support, and implementation Ferdinal Asmin; Dudung Darusman; Iin Ichwandi; Didik Suharjito
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (556.245 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.4047

Abstract

Although social forestry in Indonesia is envisioned as a policy for recognizing local practices to forest management, research is still limited. This research describes conditions of social forestry policy in West Sumatra Province as a form of mainstreaming community-based forest management. This paper provides the context of social forestry arguments, its support, and subsequent implementation. The research approach is qualitative, using a case study method. Data collection was conducted through unstructured interviews, field observations, and document studies. The analysis used categorization and coding, historical analysis, document analysis, and descriptive policy analysis. The findings revealed that the arguments for social forestry schemes were based on the persistence of state forest conflicts, forest degradation and deforestation threats, as well as human resource limitations of forestry officers. The Provincial government then initiated stakeholder support, mainly from non-governmental organizations. Social forestry implementation at the site in West Sumatra thus focused on providing development assistance programs after granting management rights to local people, as well as initiating similar schemes in other villages. Our discussions considered challenges that should be addressed, including the approach to granting management rights to secure a management area, the process of developing participatory institutions, synchronizing provincial government policies to overcome forest degradation and deforestation, and initiating activities for strengthening community solidarity and agency.
Making the case for institutional support on designing agroforestry technology models for rehabilitating critical lands Andi Nuddin; Muhammad Arsyad; Muhammad Ikbal Putera; Nuringsih Nuringsih; Temesgen Tilahun Teshome
Forest and Society Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019): APRIL
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (777.166 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v3i1.5975

Abstract

Land and forest management practices in developing countries have resulted in millions of hectares of degraded lands. This is caused by policy implementation unable to synergize between conservation-ecological goals, and the economic needs of farmer households. This study aims to showcase a model for bringing together economic and ecological interests more closely in line with one another. Furthermore, the study also presents an institutional structure of a program that could help to establish agroforestry-based land rehabilitation policies. The research employed includes a combination of Farming Income Analysis and Interpretative Structural Modeling Analysis. The results show that farming income, when employing agroforestry technology is higher than non-agroforestry approaches. Furthermore, agroforestry technology supports critical land rehabilitation and provides conditions for longer term sustainability. Therefore, a programmatic institutional approach is needed to support these dual goals. We identify that a programmatic approach would include: (1) applying conditions of an agroforestry system as a holistic structured unit, (2) improvement of farmer knowledge and skills, (3) increasing the role and capacity of relevant institutions, (4) improving coordination between sectors, (5) developing conservation agriculture systems, (6) improving bureaucratic support systems, and (7) strengthening control and supervision functions. These elements imply that implementation of agroforestry technology requires institutional support in designing policy for critical land rehabilitation, of which would have significant economic and ecological outcomes on critical lands.

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