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Forest and Society
Published by Universitas Hasanuddin
ISSN : 25494724     EISSN : 25494333     DOI : -
Core Subject : Agriculture, Social,
Forest and Society is an international and interdisciplinary journal, which publishes peer-reviewed social, political and economic research relating to people, land, and forests. Forest and Society has main geographic focus on Southeast Asia but we do not limit research possibilities that compare between and across regions.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER" : 9 Documents clear
The Sausapor Declaration: Challenges in promoting good governance to protect customary communities and natural resources in Tambrauw district, West Papua Sepus M. Fatem; Yaved Syuf; Josepina Baru; Jonni Marwa; Yubelince Y. Runtuboi; Viktor Tawer; Saur Situmorang; Ferawati R. Runtuboi
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.9346

Abstract

The Sausapor Declaration has served as a stepping stone towards convening and balancing the dynamics of governmental politics, conservation efforts, the protection of customary communities’ rights, and the sustainable management of natural resources in Tambrauw District. The Declaration supported the establishment of Tambrauw as a Conservation District, while also acknowledging the rights of customary communities in shaping political priorities of the local government, which include: a) stewardship of extensive remaining tropical forests (91.9% forest cover); b) management of protected areas, which represent 77-80% of the total area of the District; c) acknowledging the cultural traditions of five major indigenous groups; and, d) securing the active support of formal institutions for these goals. Two stages have shaped the effort to establish the Conservation District.  The first stage involved the period prior to the formal declaration, while the second ecompasses development and implementation of related policies.  Establishing local regulations and protecting local communities required extensive lobbying with the provincial and national government, as well as advocacy in various seminars, including both national and international conferences that provided strategic opportunities for securing support for the Conservation District. These steps have been instrumental in gaining legitimacy and public support for relevant conservation policies and for protecting the rights of customary communities. As one example, the review of Tambrauw spatial planning documents  (RTRW) led to prioritizing eco-tourism as a leading sector for economic development, along with the creation of an overall agropolitan and renewable energy strategy.
Cultural Landscapes in the Asia-Pacific: Re-focusing UNESCO Designation on Community Participation Wiwik Dharmiasih
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (387.128 KB) | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.10028

Abstract

World Heritage Sites, designated by UNESCO, are a growing phenomenon in global governance. Sites are nominated for their Outstanding Universal Values with the objective of protecting against potential threats from man-made or natural causes. This article focuses on one type of recognition, the Cultural Landscape, which is unique because it is a living heritage site. Within Cultural Landscapes, people continue to carry out their lives and livelihoods as part of the site. The aim of this article is to examine the way community participation takes place in the designation of Cultural Landscapes. Findings highlight some ideas for researchers and policymakers to re-examine blind spots relative to community participation and offer some considerations for more meaningfully engaging local voices, particularly with respect to vulnerable populations and generational transition. Overall, research on Cultural Landscapes need not only examine what is being protected, but also must explore the new institutions being established, which can transform sites from within.
An annotated bird checklist for Gam island, Raja Ampat, including field notes on species monitoring and conservation Julian Schrader; Michael Mühlenberg; Christina Stinn; Fabian Mühlberger; Christoph Weinrich; Tim Hofmann; John D Kalor; Soetjipto Moeljono; Christoph Parsch; Cornelia Sattler
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.8664

Abstract

Species checklists are a fundamental component of biodiversity research. They foster understanding of species distributions and habitat preferences, thus reducing gaps of knowledge in geographical occurrences of species. Especially in light of the limited availability of data on species distributions for Tanah Papua, an increasing scientific focus on the region is crucial to foster and refine the knowledge of species occurrences and to inform potential conservation planning. Despite a strong focus on conservation of Raja Ampat´s marine areas, surprisingly few studies have focused on the terrestrial biodiversity of the archipelago. As a consequence, detailed species checklists are largely missing. Here, we provide a preliminary bird species checklist for the island of Gam and its surrounding islands, located in the central Raja Ampat archipelago. During nine sampling periods between 2013 and 2019, we recorded 132 bird species in six distinct habitat types. Of the detected species, six are considered threatened by IUCN Red List criteria. We further recorded three new species for Gam Island, thereby expanding their known extent of occurrence.
Analyzing Political Marketing in Indonesia: A Palm Oil Digital Campaign Case Study Fajrina Khairiza; Bevaola Kusumasari
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.9576

Abstract

Social media in political marketing is an emerging area of research. This study explains how social networks are constructed in a digital campaign, identifying key actors, and messages involved in modern political marketing. A hotly contested palm oil campaign in Indonesia serves as a case study to analyze and visualize the messaging content found in digital campaigns. Social Network Analysis (SNA) was used to map the social network sites in Twitter and to track social interaction patterns in the #SawitBaik campaign. The results confirmed that state institutions, non-governmental institutions, news media, and individuals were key actors in the digital campaign. The actors’ roles varied from providing information and supporting palm oil activities to criticizing palm oil activities and promoting campaign events. Most tweets were critical of the government, serving as brand advocacy. The #SawitBaik campaign is also an example of political marketing used by a government in order to influence its citizens. In this case, the goal was to shape and win public support by legitimizing palm oil activities in Indonesia.
Correlation of Climate Variability and Burned Area in Borneo using Clustering Methods Ishardina C. Hidayati; Novinda Nalaratih; Ayu Shabrina; Intan N. Wahyuni; Arnida L. Latifah
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.9687

Abstract

The island of Borneo has faced seasonal forest fires for decades. This phenomenon is worsening during dry seasons, especially when droughts are concurrent with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. Climate is therefore one of the drivers of the fire phenomenon. This paper studies the relationship between climate variables, namely temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and wind speed, and the occurrence of forest fire using two clustering methods, K-means and Fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering methods. Borneo is clustered into four areas based on burned area data obtained from Global Fire Emission Data (GFED). It is also clustered according to the combinations of climate variables. Both methods reach the highest correlation between the climate variable and the burned area clusters in September. The K-means method gives a correlation of -0.54 while the FCM gives -0.55. In August until October, relative humidity provides the dominant correlation affecting burned area, even though an additional precipitation or wind variable slightly increases the correlation in the FCM method. In November, temperature largely contributed to the burned area by a positive correlation of 0.31 in K-means and 0.33 in FCM. The evaluation performance of the methods is conducted by an internal validation called the Silhouette index. Both methods have positive index values ranging from 0.39 to 0.69 and the maximum value is influenced by the wind cluster. This indicates that the clustering methods applied in this paper can identify one or a combination of climate variables into dense and well-separated clusters.
Homegarden Ethnobotany of Two Saibatin Villages in Lampung, Indonesia: Species Diversity, Uses, and Values Anisatu Z Wakhidah; Tatik Chikmawati; Yohanes Purwanto
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.9720

Abstract

Since homegardens reflect a culture of a particular ethnic group, the study in homegardens provide unique insights into ethnobotany. The Saibatin sub-tribe in Lampung has extensive uses for plants, but an ethnobotanical study of their homegardens are still lacking. This study aimed to describe the structure and composition of the Saibatin community homegarden and to explain the diversity of plants and the usage patterns through an ethnobotany perspective. The study also aimed to elaborate species with social-economic and ecological functions and to describe the overall functions of homegardens. Ethnobotanical data were collected using participant observation methods, which were complemented by questionnaires. We determined the key respondents and common respondents using the purposive sampling and snowball sampling method, while homegarden plant species diversity was identified using vegetation analysis methods. The results showed that 3 size categories of homegardens are present in this area, including narrow, medium, and broad. The homegarden structure consisted of hadap/tangebah (front yard), gelekhan (side yard), and kudan (backyard). Six types of habitus composed the homegarden structure, namely herbaceous, epiphytes, shrubs, trees, succulents, and vines. The homegarden species richness index (DMg) in Way Jambu Village (WJA) (17.34) was higher than Labuhan Mandi Village (LMA) (16.87). Even so, the homegarden plant diversity (H’) and evenness (J ) in LMA was higher than WJA. There were 16 plant usage categories used by the Saibatin community (WJA 15; LMA14). Foodstuffs were the usage category of homegardens with the highest number of species in both villages. The species ICS value ranges between the two villages were relatively similar. The highest ICS species in WJA was Cocos nucifera while in LMA was Cymbopogon citratus. By studying ethnobotany of Saibatin sub-tribe homegarden we conclude that the three main roles of the homegardens are to provide social-economic impacts, ecological services, and representing the cultural value of Saibatin community identity
Indicators to Evaluate the Institutional Effectiveness of National Climate Financing Mechanisms Muhammad Sheriffdeen; Dodik Ridho Nurrochmat; Perdinan Perdinan; Monica Di Gregorio
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.10309

Abstract

Over the past few decades, tackling climate change has persistently featured in international discussions, with the main issues centring on mobilising adequate global response and effectively coordinating and channelling this response at the sub-national levels. In order to effectively mobilize and harmonize resources to address climate change at country level, the idea of establishing national climate finance institutions (NCFIs) with the duty to mobilise, manage and allocate funds to implement climate change actions has gained prominence among developing countries. This study develops an indicator-based framework to evaluate the institutional effectiveness of the Indonesian Climate Change Trust Fund (ICCTF) as a case study. Building on previous frameworks and principles of climate finance, a total of 21 indicators were identified, these indicators were categorized into five effectiveness components, which are: were identified, and these indicators were categorized into five effectiveness components, which include: legal and regulatory framework, fund mobilization and sustainability, fund management and allocation, monitoring and evaluation, and transparency and accountability. We find that the major and fundamental weakness of the ICCTF is its inability to adequately mobilize funds, while its strength is in management and allocation of available resources.  Inclusion of the legal and regulatory framework component, which has been largely absent in previous studies, further enabled us to identify critical legal gaps in the operationalization of the ICCTF. While the current legal foundation of the ICCTF ensures transparency and accountability, it significantly constrains the ICCTFs flexibility and innovative potentials.
Protected Areas’ Latent Functions and Social Consequences: A Case from Mount Hamiguitan, Philippines Eva Natividad Mendoza; Roy G. Ponce; Sheryl Mae A. Soria; Victor B. Amoroso
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.10485

Abstract

While protected areas (PAs) are established primarily for biological diversity conservation and provision of ecological services, social dimensions comes into play. This paper extends the discourse on PAs’ impact to local communities by focusing on the latent functions and social consequences utilizing Robert Merton’s Functional Analysis. Based on in-depth interviews among community leaders and elders, and forest custodians around Mount Hamiguitan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is revealed that establishment of PAs entails varied consequences beyond what are being intended and manifested. While communities availed of some latent benefits from the declaration of the PA, they also have responses that limit the success of conservation initiatives. Hence, forest protection is a complex social and political process that demands more integrative response on community’s social, cultural, and political structures and dynamics.
The politics of numbers and additionality governing the national Payment for Forest Environmental Services scheme in Vietnam: A case study from Son La province Pham Thu Thuy; Ngo Ha Chau; Dao Thi Linh Chi; Hoang Tuan Long; Micah R. Fisher
Forest and Society Vol. 4 No. 2 (2020): NOVEMBER
Publisher : Forestry Faculty, Universitas Hasanuddin

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.24259/fs.v4i2.10891

Abstract

Payments for forest environmental services (PFES) is a major breakthrough policy in the Vietnamese forestry sector because it contributes 25% of the total investments in the forestry sector and serves as the first market-based instrument employed to protect forests. However, there is little empirical evidence of its effectiveness. Is the policy meeting the core objectives of improving forest cover and forest quality and is it also achieving its claims of supporting local livelihoods? This paper analyses the environmental, social, and economic impacts of PFES in Son La province, the longest standing implementation of a PFES scheme in Vietnam. Our study uses a sampling method that incorporates pre-matching and a before-after-control-intervention approach. Data was collected from government statistics, remote sensing analysis, focus group discussions involving 236 people, surveys with a total of 240 households, and key informant interviews with 45 people. Our findings show that additionality of PFES in Son La is controversial and depends on who collects the data and what data is used to evaluate the impacts of PFES. Data collection is also politicized to serve central, provincial and district government interests. Evidence shows that PFES has provided little additional income to individual villagers to protect forests in Son La. However, total PFES revenue paid to communities generates significant income for village communities. Moreover, not all villagers can receive continuous payments from PFES, meaning that PFES has not become a stable source of income, rendering the permanence of PFES limited. Improving monitoring and evaluation policies coupled with transparent, inclusive, independent mechanisms are essential to providing a more accurate reflection of impacts from PFES in Vietnam.

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