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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II" : 9 Documents clear
Moens’written transmission of dalang lore van Groenendael, Victoria M. Clara
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1370.375 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.458

Abstract

Much of the storytelling in Java is the profession of the puppeteers (dalang; also spelled dhalang) who perform and direct shadow theatre plays (wayang). They improvise their stories in the context which their performance requires. Unless commissioned to do so by a patron, it is very unusual for a dalang to sit down and actually write out a story (lakon). In the early decades of the twentieth century in the area of Yogyakarta, a kind of storytelling mini-industry arose at the instigation of some western scholarly patrons and laymen interested in Javanese popular culture. One such patron was Ir. J.L. Moens. He encouraged dalangs to write down folk tales and, as they were dalangs, they clothed these in the wayang idiom. After Moens’ death in 1954, his unpublished collection of wayang stories was dispersed. In 1964 one part found its way into the Leiden University Library. The topics discussed are: how the Collectie Moens originated and what its purpose was; who its authors were; which tradition they acknowledged; and the relationship between the Collectie Moens and the court collections of Surakarta and Yogyakarta.
Telling and selling Literary fiction in early Malay language newspapers in colonial Indonesia Nie?, Joachim
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1805.728 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.453

Abstract

When newspapers in the colloquial Malay language appeared in the Dutch East Indies in the middle of the nineteenth century, they did more than just publish news reports and advertisements. They also created a new platform for the telling and distribution of literary fiction. In effect, literary texts soon played an important role in the vernacular print media. The first part of this article analyses the attraction of newspaper literature from the perspective of both the reader and the editor in general and gives a survey of the various forms of literary genres which can be found in newspapers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the second part, one particular serialized novel will be discussed in detail to demonstrate how the mode of publication also influenced the way stories were told.
The art of storytelling in Old Javanese prose as illustrated by the story of Ekalawya van der Molen, Willem
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (244.753 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.457

Abstract

Scholarly attention for Old Javanese literature so far has mainly focused on poetry. The apparently simple nature of narrative prose texts, while making them excellent sources for linguistic and lexicographic research, at the same time denies them any literary value. In this article an impression is given of the art of storytelling in one Old Javanese prose story, taken from the Adiparwa of around A.D. 1000. Quite unexpectedly, a sophisticated tradition unfolds in which a rich variety of devices enables the storyteller to create a meaningful world of words.
Bart Barendregt and Els Bogaerts (eds), Recollecting resonances; Indonesian-Dutch musical encounters. Leiden: Brill, 2013, xii + 354 pp. [Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut Voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde / Southeast Asia Mediated, 4.] ISBN: 978 Langguth, Svann
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (256.043 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.461

Abstract

The installation of Prince Mangkubumi Performing Javanese history Bogaerts, Els
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1108.377 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.456

Abstract

Representation of Javanese history in performance plays an important role in the self-characterization of the Special Region of Yogyakarta. It legitimizes the power of the rulers and strengthens the identity of the city and its inhabitants. The audiences know the stories and this is part of the fun. In the study of oral traditions it is essential to take these performances into account. In the stories featuring famous political figures from the history of Mataram and Yogyakarta, there is an intricate relationship between the written and the spoken word: all are based on both oral and written traditions and are performed ‘orally’. Prince Mangkubumi, who was to become the first sultan of Yogyakarta in 1755, is one of the historical personages who are protagonists in various performance genres. Focusing on the tale of Prince Mangkubumi’s accession to the throne, I shall reflect on how the televised kethoprak version combines a (written) text with a mediated (aural/visual) performance to present the story.
Dick van der Meij and N. Lamboij (eds), with the assistance of Oman Fathurachman, The Malay Hikayat Miʻrāj Nabi Muhammad; The prophet Muḥammad’s nocturnal journey to Heaven and hell: text and translation [from the Malay] of Cod. Or. 1713 in the Library o Burhanudin, Jajat
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (297.952 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.460

Abstract

Carool Kersten, Islam in Indonesia; The contest for society, ideas and values. London: Hurst & Company, 2015, xx + 373 pp. ISBN: 9781849044370. Price: GBP 25.00 (soft cover). Watson, C.W.
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (242.039 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.459

Abstract

Flat puppets on an empty screen, stories in the round Imagining space in wayang kulit and the worlds beyond Arps, Bernard
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (871.769 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.455

Abstract

The puppets are flat, the screen against which they are placed and moved is white and devoid of scenery. In what kinds of space do the stories of the classical shadow-play of Java, Bali, Lombok, and the Malay world unfold despite this double flatness? How do performers use not only puppets and screen but also music and language to bring space into being? What must spectators know and do to make sense of these storytelling techniques? As a contribution to the narratological study of the multimodal making of storyworlds, I demonstrate that wayang kulit caters for different degrees of interpretive competence, which yield different understandings of the space that wayang portrays. An expert way of apprehending space requires seeing beyond the screen, puppets, and silhouettes, or even looking away from them. At the same time the peculiar ways of narrating space in wayang point to a deeply felt spatiality in real-life contexts as well.
Some notes on the pantun storytelling of the Baduy minority group its written and audiovisual documentation van Zanten, Wim
Wacana Vol 17, No 3 (2016): Stories and storytelling in Indonesia II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2088.967 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v17i3.454

Abstract

Baduy pantun stories are part of the larger Sundanese oral tradition of pantun storytelling in west Java. The stories recount the deeds of the nobility of such old Sundanese kingdoms as Pajajaran and Galuh. Although the Baduy still recite the pantun stories in their rituals, in the larger cities to the east of the Baduy village Kanékés pantun recitation almost disappeared. On the basis of short periods of fieldwork in and around Kanékés village between 1976 and 2014, in this essay I shall discuss Baduy pantun storytelling. I shall summarize earlier major publications and analyse some performance aspects of two Baduy pantun stories which I recorded. Although I do not concentrate on the text, I do discuss a few cultural issues arising from the texts. Baduy oral literature also includes children’s and women’s songs, as well as fables and myths of origin (dongéng) which do not involve music. These will not be discussed here.

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