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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I" : 16 Documents clear
Indonesian Chinese in the Netherlands and the legacies of violence in colonial and post-colonial Indonesia Meer, Alexander van der; Eickhoff, Martijn
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (275.015 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.573

Abstract

After Indonesian independence in 1945, thousands of Indonesian Chinese repatriated to the Netherlands, the former colonizer. As opposed to other repatriates from Indonesia, who organized themselves into pressure groups and fought for a place in the national memory culture, the Indonesian Chinese in the Netherlands only formed strict socio-cultural associations and have generally stayed clear of identity politics. Usually, this divergence is attributed to the smooth integration and socio-economic success of the latter group, as well as to Chinese values, such as conflict avoidance.This article adds to this explanation by positing that this phenomenon has also been induced by the legacy of anti-Chinese violence in colonial and post-colonial Indonesia: respectively, Dutch discomfort to acknowledge the violent and discriminatory elements of its own colonial history, as well as a fear of offending the Indonesian government. Consequently, many Indonesian Chinese in the Netherlands have engaged in some form of public self-silencing.
Book review; Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East. Watson, C.W.
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (375.259 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.582

Abstract

Moral is political Notions of ideal citizenship in Lie Kim Hok’s Hikajat Khonghoetjoe Sutrisno, Evi
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (383.622 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.577

Abstract

This paper argues that the Hikajat Khonghoetjoe (The life story of Confucius), written by Lie Kim Hok in 1897, is a medium to propose modern ideas of flexible subjectivity, cosmopolitanism, active citizenship and the concepts of good governance to the Chinese Peranakans who experienced political and racial discrimination under Dutch colonization. Using the figure of Confucius, Lie aimed to cultivate virtuous subjects who apply their faith and morality in political sphere. He intended to raise political awareness and rights among the Chinese as colonial subjects and to valorize their bargaining power with the Dutch colonial government. By introducing Confucianism, Lie proposed that the Chinese reconnect themselves with China as an alternative patronage which could subvert White supremacy. Instead of using sources in Chinese, Lie translated the biography of Confucius from the European texts. In crafting his story, Lie applied conglomerate authorship, a technique commonly practised by Malay authors. It allowed him to select, combine and appropriate the source texts. To justify that Confucius' virtue and his teaching were superb and are applicable to contemporary life, Lie borrowed and emphasized European writers’ high appraisal of Confucianism, instead of using his own arguments and opinions. I call this writing technique “indirect agency”.
Long way home The life history of Chinese-Indonesian migrants in the Netherlands Kitamura, Yumi
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (214.094 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.572

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to trace the modern history of Indonesia through the experience of two Chinese Indonesians who migrated to the Netherlands at different periods of time. These life stories represent both post-colonial experiences and the Cold War politics in Indonesia. The migration of Chinese Indonesians since the beginning of the twentieth century has had long history, however, most of the previous literature has focused on the experiences of the “Peranakan” group who are not representative of various other groups of Chinese Indonesian migrants who have had different experiences in making their journey to the Netherlands. This paper will present two stories as a parallel to the more commonly known narratives of the “Peranakan” experience.
Book review; Petualangan Unjung dan Mbui Kuvong; Sastra lisan dan kamus Punan Tuvu’ dari Kalimantan. Sellato, Bernard
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (338.36 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.581

Abstract

Confucius Institute at Universitas Al Azhar, Jakarta The unseen power of China Lan, Thung Ju
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4994.318 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.576

Abstract

China’s soft power is a difficult concept to measure if the Confucius Institute is the only source relied on. Joseph Nye’s concept of soft power puts a strong emphasis on “the power of attraction” as a tool to persuade or “to shape the preferences of others” in the worlds of business and politics. To understand how this soft power - or the Confucius Institute - works, we have to determine the “observable” power of the “intangible” attraction embedded in it. This observable but intangible attraction is assumed to be “embedded”in the language and culture offered by the Institute, namely so-called “shared values”. However, without having attended its classes, it is difficult to see which values are being shared with the local students. Despite this handicap, it is very apparent that the image of China itself has acted as an attraction. An attraction to China was visible already, even before the Confucius Institute was established. For Indonesians, China is a big country which has exerted its power there for a long time through its diaspora and/or exports. Therefore, the Confucius Institute is just one of the many forms of Chinese-ness within their purview. Certainly, the Confucius Institute might have assisted in adjusting negative impressions and expelling some of the reservations the Indonesians have about China. Nevertheless, its influence extends to only a limited number of people who are closely engaged with the Institute.
The strategic adaptation of Chinese-Manadonese in the Reform Era Waworuntu, Adrianus L.G.; Alkatiri, Zeffry; Gani, Fuad
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (220.955 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.585

Abstract

This article is a further discussion of previous research which is a pilot project to observe patterns of cultural interaction within the Chinese community in Indonesia as a part of a project to understand the phenomenon of the multicultural society during the New Order Era. The specific target of this research is to study the socio-cultural interactions within the Chinese community in Manado during the Reform Era (2000-2014). This research aims to study the strategic adaptation of the Chinese in Manado, by analysing the obstacles and opportunities in their socio-cultural interaction with the locals. Using data from field research and literature studies, this qualitative research applies an ethnographic approach by observing various actions in their socio-cultural interactions.
Book review; Tesamoko; Tesaurus Bahasa Indonesia Steinhauer, Hein
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (169.868 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.583

Abstract

Violent, political, and administrative repression of the Chinese minority in Indonesia, 1945-1998 Heidhues, Mary Somers
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (860.591 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.574

Abstract

Since Indonesian independence, its Chinese minority has been a victim of violent outbreaks, but also of restrictive policies arising from politics and administrative measures. From about 1957, with the closure of Chinese-language schools and subsequent regulations about expression of Chinese culture, many speak of the “erasure” of that culture through such restrictions. Violent anti-Chinese outbreaks have proceeded from the Indonesian Revolution and the presidency of Soekarno (especially the so-called “PP-10” measures against Chinese rural traders) to the era of Suharto, which began with the 1965-1967 anti-Communist massacres and their effects on ehtnic Chinese and came to an end with the provocation of violence against ethnic Chinese in major Indonesian cities. This paper also discusses the reactions to these waves of anti-Chinese measures: rejection, flight, but also countermeasures in the form of political activity. In the years since Reformasi, as attacks on them have subsided, many Chinese Indonesians have chosen to emphasize their participation in Indonesian history and their positive contributions to Indonesian culture.
Preface Moeimam, Susi; Liem, Maya H.T.
Wacana Vol 18, No 1 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (110.865 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i1.598

Abstract

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