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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II" : 12 Documents clear
Pecinan as an inspiration The contribution of Chinese Indonesian architecture to an urban environment Tjiook, Wiwi
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4636.084 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.596

Abstract

Since the abrogation of Presidential Instruction Number 14/1967 which banned Chinese customs celebrations and religion in public, there has been a revival in Chinese festivals, language, art, media, culture and not in the least in the field of architecture and urban planning. With increasing interest in heritage and the support of the Indonesian government for heritage cities programmes, several promising initiatives involving Chinese architecture have been launched in cities both large and small. A brief glance of the history of Chinese Indonesian architecture is given, as well as some recent initiatives in selected cities plus a discussion of the importance of public space in accommodating Chinese festivals. Study of old maps and photographs prompts reflections on the characteristics and development of Pecinan during the colonial era and of their later history. The analysis in this article and examples of recent developments in the cities discussed can be used as an inspiration in the revitalization of Pecinan, thereby contributing in an attractive and livable urban environment.
Bangsawan prampoewan Enlightened Peranakan Chinese women from early twentieth century Java Kwartanada, Didi
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1489.079 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.591

Abstract

The end of the nineteenth century witnessed paradox among the Chinese in colonial Java. On one hand, they were prospering economically, but were nonetheless held in contempt by the Dutch, encountered legal discrimination and faced challenges if they wanted to educate their children in European schools. Their marginal position motivated them do their utmost to become “civilized subjects”, on a par with Europeans, but they were also inspired to reinvent their Chinese identity. This contribution will highlight role played by “enlightened” Chinese, the kaoem moeda bangsa Tjina. Central to this movement were the Chinese girls known to the public as bangsawan prampoewan (the noblewomen), who wrote letters the newspaper and creating a gendered public sphere. They also performed western classical music in public. Considering the inspirational impact of bangsawan prampoewan’s enlightening achievements on non-Chinese women, it is appropriate to include them into the narrative of the history of the nation’s women’s movements.
The Chinese-Indonesian collections in the National Museum of World Cultures, the Netherlands Brinkgreve, Francine; Leijfeldt, Johanna
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (10830.878 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.586

Abstract

Among the more than 130,000 objects from Indonesia in the Dutch National Museum of World Cultures, many once belonged to or were used by the Chinese population of Indonesia. In this article, the authors provide an overview of these collections by presenting their collecting histories from the earliest acquisitions to the most recent collections and by highlighting a number of objects, which in their materials, techniques, motifs, colours or function show a combination of elements from both Chinese and Indonesian cultures. The authors pay particular attention to objects which play a role in the Chinese-Indonesian wedding ceremony.
An early story of Kho Ping Hoo Watson, CW
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (757.735 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.595

Abstract

Kho Ping Hoo (1926–1994) is the most well-known of all Indonesian writers of popular silat stories, largely set in China, which describe the adventures and romances of legendary heroes famed for their skill in martial arts. It is less well-known that he began his career writing critical stories about socio-economic conditions in the late 50s and early 60s. This paper discusses one of these stories. It places the story in the context of political developments of the time, in particular as they affected the Chinese Indonesian community. The paper argues that this story and one or two others like it come at the end of a tradition of Sino-Indonesian literature which had flourished from the end of the nineteenth century until the mid-1950s. After 1960, Chinese-Indonesian writers cease writing realist fiction of any kind and write either silat stories or romantic stories set in middle class urban environments.
Sajarah Cina A nineteenth-century apology in Javanese Molen, Willem van der
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3044.294 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.590

Abstract

The sometimes precarious position of the Chinese in Indonesia has a long history. The (most probably) nineteenth-century author, Apdul Mutalip, advocated a more balanced view by pointing out some fundamental contributions the Chinese had made to the welfare of the Javanese; he also demonstrates that their presence in Java has a basis in law. Although seems like a poem in Javanese metre, his Sajarah Cina, written in Javanese, is remarkable not only for its subject matter but also for the way the material is presented, in a rhetoric unknown to exist in Javanese literature by most scholars.
Chinese taukeh, labourer, and state control Case study of panglong in eastern region of Sumatra (1890-1930) Erman, Erwiza
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (623.484 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.594

Abstract

Recently the flow of labour from China to Indonesia has fuelled many discussions but is not a new phenomenon. It can be traced back to the eighteenth century and continued until the twentieth century. In colonial Indonesia, the Chinese labour force was recruited to work in the economic sectors of mining, plantations, fisheries and forestry. Unfortunately, previous studies about Chinese society in Indonesia more focused on economic and political elites rather than the social history of the Chinese contract coolies. This article attempts to look at the labour history of the Chinese coolie in the forest exploitation companies, known as panglong. By focusing on the ways in which they were treated in the recruitment process and workplace, this article shows that changes for the better did take place in the appalling working conditions of the labourers. Until the second decade of the twentieth century, recruitment, food, and health care were rife with manipulations, exacerbated by arduous working conditions and insecurity in the workplace, abuse of power by mandors and forms of non-economic coercion like the use of opium. All these factors were meant to ensure that the Chinese contract labourers could not break loose from their indentures, a modern form of slavery. Hampered by budgetary restrictions, lack of personnel, and marine transport facilities, the state colonial officials were hamstrung. But in the second decade of twentieth century, when the abysmal working conditions of the Chinese coolies were debated on a higher level by politicians and bureauracts state control was tightened. More effectual control by the state had a positive effect on improving of the working and living conditions.
The Kai Ba Lidai Shiji 开吧历代史记 An autonomous history of the Chinese community of Batavia/ Jakarta in the VOC period Blussé, Leonard
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (367.436 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.589

Abstract

This essay critically examines the Kai Ba Lidai Shiji (Annals of Batavia), a Chinese history of Batavia which was written by an anonymous Chinese author around 1794 as part of the rather large corpus of Chinese archival sources about the history of the Chinese community of Batavia/Jakarta. A short introduction about earlier authors who have dealt with the text is followed by comments on the composition, structure and historical value of this unique urban history.
Acknowledgement Roosman, Lilie M.
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (105.881 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.599

Abstract

Chinese correspondence in Dutch East Indies (1865-1949) Siem, Tjong Han
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.588

Abstract

This article is an attempt to describe some aspects of the social history of the Chinese minority in the Dutch East Indies using items of postal history as a guide. It is a very personal view, seen through the eyes of a philatelist. Using a postal history collection, aspects of political history can be illustrated and/or documented. This article is certainly not to be read as a solid, documented scientific exercise. It should be read in the spirit of educational entertainment.
Culture, power and identity The case of Ang Hien Hoo, Malang Budianta, Melani
Wacana Vol 18, No 2 (2017): Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (5439.382 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v18i2.593

Abstract

This paper discusses the intricate relations between culture and identity in a web of larger power structures of politics and the market by looking at the ways in which the Indonesian Chinese attach themselves to a local performing arts tradition. The paper focuses on the history of the wayang orang amateur club called Ang Hien Hoo in Malang, East Java, which emerged from a Chinese diaspora burial association, to attract national limelight in the 1950s and 1960s. In this paper, I see this amateur club as a site, not only for cultural assimilation, but also as a meeting space for the diverse migrant Chinese population residing at a host country. The space is used to negotiate their position as citizens responsible to promote and to become patrons of local traditional performing arts. The paper examines how this amateur club was swept by the Cold War politics and national political turmoil of 1965, and how it fought to survive under the pressures of the global capitalist era. What emerges from the findings is the contradictory fact that the identification of the Chinese with the Javanese traditional performing arts is affirmed precisely as it is marked by Chineseness. Thus, despite the cultural blending, the Chinese Indonesian’s patronage of local traditional art continuously reproduces the double bind of making home in the culture not seen as their own.

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