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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs" : 11 Documents clear
Wòlak-waliké jaman; Exploring contemporary Walikan in public space Yannuar, Nurenzia
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (18889.337 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.625

Abstract

This article describes the current use of Walikan, a youth language in Malang, Indonesia. Unlike previously decribed youth registers in Indonesia, Walikan has been around since as early as the 1940s and has continuously reinvented itself ever since. As will be shown, the speakers of Walikan have certain strategies to keep the practice alive. In addition to the use of Walikan in oral face-to-face communication, they also use Walikan in songs, local TV news, local newspaper columns, as well as in public signs. The analysis focuses on how a youth language that started out as an oral practice was being maintained through written and audio-visual media offline and online. The results inform us how a community work together in shaping their identity through linguistic means. 
The expression of location and space in Surinamese and Indonesian Javanese Villerius, Sophie
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (226.503 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.624

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of language contact and multilingualism on the expression of location and space in the heritage variety of Javanese spoken in Suriname. Alongside Javanese, this community also speaks Sranantongo and Dutch. It is found that Surinamese speakers tend to use simple locative constructions more frequently than baseline speakers, at the expense of complex constructions. It is shown that the individual speaker variables age, generation, place of residence, and network play a role in explaining the usage of simple versus complex locative constructions in Surinamese Javanese: the more language contact speakers experience, the more they will use simple constructions at the cost of complex ones.
Polite vocabulary in the Javanese language of Surabaya Krauße, Daniel
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (552.655 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.615

Abstract

Surabaya and its surroundings are known for their peculiar dialect, which does not only exhibit very characteristic phonological and morphological features, but also has a politeness, honorific, and deferential system that has so far remained largely understudied. It is the aim of this paper to shed further light on the sociolinguistic situation of the Javanese dialect of the city of Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia with a focus on the polite vocabulary (Krama, Krama Andhap, and Krama Inggil). Although to the Central Javanese ear, speakers of Surabayan Javanese sound discourteous, they by no means are impolite. After a general introduction about the linguistic situation in Surabaya, a brief typological summary of politeness systems throughout the world is given, which helps debunk the persistent language myth that speakers of Surabayan Javanese are rude. This paper will show that the dialect rather exhibits a binary T-V distinction in politeness similar to that in French and German, as opposed to the strict speech level system as found in Central Javanese, Korean, and Japanese. 
The compartmentalization of languages and identities among nationalist youth in Semarang Tamtomo, Kristian
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (518.672 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.623

Abstract

Contemporary mainstream discourse on youths in Indonesia tends to define it in terms of the popular-culture-oriented notion of youth. This article seeks to show that certain state-formed youth groups, particularly in institutional settings, continue to promote the state-oriented pemuda or nationalist youth identity. By looking at an example of a Paskibra group (Pasukan Pengibar Bendera – the Flag-Raising Troop) from a state vocational high school in Semarang, Central Java, the article seeks to highlight the way in which these youths combine language and symbolic behaviours to present this nationalist identity. Concurrently, these youths also appropriate elements of popular culture in order to present a compartmentalized or separate remaja identity that complements their core nationalist identity. While not prominently visible in Indonesian popular culture, nationalist forms of youth identity, such as the Paskibra, continue to have currency in various state and institutional sectors.
Preface Klok, Jozina Vander; Conners, Thomas J.
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.06 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.674

Abstract

The island of Java is home to several major languages. Javanese—spokenmainly in Central and East Java—is the world’s 11th or 12th largest languagewith well over 80 million native speakers. It has the oldest and fullest recordedhistory of any Austronesian language. It also has been of considerable interestto scholars because of the system of speech levels or styles found in manyJavanese varieties. Sundanese—spoken in West Java—has over 27 millionspeakers, and Madurese—spoken on the neighbouring island of Maduraand throughout parts of East Java—is the third largest local language, withcounts ranging from 7 to 13 million speakers. Varieties of Sundanese andMadurese as well as Balinese and Sasak—the geographically, historically,and linguistically related languages on the neighbouring islands of Bali andLombok—also have speech level systems. Each of these languages displaysa range of dialects, isolects, continua, and contact varieties and yet they havereceived relatively little attention from linguists.
Behind the Eco-friendliness of “batik warna alam”'; Discovering the motives behind the production of batik in Jarum village, Klaten Handayani, Widhi; Kristijanto, Augustinus Ignatius; Hunga, Arianti Ina Restiani
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (414.611 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.673

Abstract

The policy of sustainable production has encouraged small batik businesses to shift to natural dyes as these are considered eco-friendly. However, the motivation behind juragan batiks’ embracing natural dyes still has some question marks attached. This qualitative study explains the motivation of the juragan batiks in using natural colourants in their production of batik warna alam and explores the significance of batik warna alam to juragan batik. We found the production of batik warna alam tended to be triggered by economic reasons not environmental consciousness. This related to the meaning of batik warna alam to maintaining the economic survival of the juragans. Juragans are convinced that batik warna alam is eco-friendly according to the indicators to which they subscribe: (1) the materials are found in their immediate surroundings; (2) the process causes no pollution or environmental destruction; and (3) the production does not pose a health threat to people, including workers. This study provides the insight that an eco-friendly-labelled production might not necessarily be motivated by a high level of environmental consciousness.
Irrealis, aspect, and complementation in Old Javanese Hunter, Thomas M.
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (368.708 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.672

Abstract

This article focuses on two issues in the study of the syntax and semantics of the Old Javanese: (1) the effects of irrealis on the marking of the “passive” or Undergoer Voice verb phrases of Old Javanese, and (2) the study of complementation in Old Javanese, with particular reference to a particle n/an, first studied in an article by E.M. Uhlenbeck (1986). The study is introduced with a brief survey of some of the major components of the morphosyntactic system of Old Javanese developed largely using the analytical framework of Nicholas Himmelmann’s study (2005) of the symmetrical voice systems of the Austronesian family. Some terms like PRO have been adapted for use from more recent transformational models with a view to making the research for the paper accessible to a wider range of readers interested in syntactic and semantic issues in language.
The development of the English-type passive in Balinese Nomoto, Hiroki
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (253.884 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.620

Abstract

The morpheme -a in Balinese is ambiguous between the third person enclitic pronoun and a passive voice marker. Different views exist as to whether the morpheme can be the pronoun in the presence of a teken agentive phrase. This paper argues that it can and that the construction in which the pronoun -a and a teken phrase co-occur (the hybrid type) is an instance of clitic doubling. A hypothesis is proposed about how the third person pronoun changed into a passive marker and how different passive subtypes came into existence. It is claimed that the hybrid type played a key role in the change. The hybrid type supports the analysis of passives in general as a clitic doubling construction (Baker, Johnson and Roberts 1989). A clitic doubling analysis of passives enables a new typology of passives whereby passives are classified according to how the clitic and its double in a passive clause are expressed.
Losing the battle; The marginalization of Javanese compact forms Munandar, Aris
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (236.725 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.617

Abstract

 In the contact situation with Indonesian, the standard variety of Javanese in Yogyakarta is experiencing an incipient shift. The shift is indicated by the shrinking domain of use, and the degradation of speakers’ proficiency. It also reveals some ongoing changes in its structure, observable in the tendency of the younger generation to use particular elements different to those used by grandparent and parent generations. This article examines unique patterns of Javanese morphosyntax by focusing on the suffix -a, infix -um-, -in-, and confix ka-an, on the basis of utterances recorded from authentic speech events involving speakers of different generations. The findings show a gradual replacement of these affixes by a more general morphosyntax pattern similar to that of Indonesian. It concludes that the suffix -a and infix -um-, -in- exhibit low resistance to the imposition of Indonesian. It also predicts that in future Javanese will show more convergent with Indonesian because of the marginalization of unique patterns of Javanese morphosyntax. 
The description of the di– passive construction in dialectal Javanese Malihah, Noor
Wacana Vol 19, No 1 (2018): Language and culture in Java and its environs
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (302.809 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i1.621

Abstract

Corpus of the non-standard Kudus Dialect of Javanese (JDK) passive voice construction was constructed in the course of fieldwork in Kudus and was annotated for several syntactic/semantic features. An investigation was undertaken into the di– affix in the JDK which encodes the passive function as compared to the Standard Javanese in a quantitative descriptive analysis. The results indicate the existence of an abbreviated agentive passive which occurs more frequently than the agentive passive; but less frequently than the agentless passive. The results also show that the passives of JDK are in fact likely to have inanimate subjects and have only animate demoted agent. However, human demoted agents appear more frequently than animal agents. Also, there is a tendency that  the unmarked passive is most likely to be used as an agentless passive. The results suggest that the less colloquial the genre, the less likely the unmarked passive is to occur.

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