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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies" : 10 Documents clear
Notes on structural distinctions in Malay dialects Ogloblin, Alexander
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (306.122 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.706

Abstract

Some features of phonology, morphophonemics, and morphology are offered, which seem to be useful for classifying Malay dialects on structural basis. Dialectal differences with Standard Malay are illustrated on minor samples of Johor and Kelantan dialects recorded during author’s stay in Malaysia several decades ago.  
The first standard grammar of Malay; George Werndly’s 1736 Maleische spraakkunst Mahdi, Waruno
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3844.838 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.644

Abstract

A brief biography of George Henrik Werndly and description of contemporaneous development of linguistics is followed by a perusal of Melchior Leydekker’s and Petrus van der Vorm’s policy of strictly using Classical Malay in Christian publication, that served as basis of Werndly’s work. Then, a detailed perusal of Werndly’s 1736 Malay grammar, in particular the divisions (“books”) on (I) spelling, (II) morphology, and (III) syntax, is illustrated by reproductions of original text passages. Elements of the complicated Latin-script spelling are demonstrated in detail and compared with that of other authors in separate tables. Werndly’s grammatical terminology is considered, and where Arabisms are used, Werndly’s spelling is provided besides modern Indonesian cognates and Arabic etymons. Signs of a likely precolonial Malayan grammar tradition are inspected. Finally, the partly unexpected influence of Werndly’s work on language policy of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is inspected.
Utterance-final particles in Klang Valley Malay Hoogervorst, Tom Gunner
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (489.58 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.704

Abstract

This paper examines a group of small morphemes analysed as “utterance-final particles” in the Malay variety of the Klang Valley, West Malaysia. It provides a preliminary investigation into their usage and diachronic evolution, connecting fieldwork-based findings with extant research on other Malay varieties. There is no univocal definition of utterance-final particles – known by other scholars as “discourse particles” or “pragmatic particles” – nor broad agreement on the term’s conceptual validity. Most previous research on Malay varieties approaches these units as unbound morphemes with no grammatical and little obvious lexical meaning, relegating their functionality to the realm of pragmatics. This study calls attention to data from Klang Valley Malay to demonstrate that particles cannot easily be divided into “grammatical” and “pragmatic” categories. Most utterance-final particles discussed here are etymologically derived from verbs, adverbs, interjections and other word classes and can at best be classified as “part-time” pragmatic particles. They display varying levels of grammaticality and pragmaticality depending on their intonation and syntactic position.
Book review: Toys for the souls; Life and art on the Mentawai Islands Tulius, Juniator
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.524 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.710

Abstract

Regular sound change; The evidence of a single example Adelaar, Alexander
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (309.341 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.703

Abstract

The Neogrammarians of the Leipzig School introduced the principle that sound changes are regular and that this regularity is without exceptions. At least as a working hypothesis, this principle has remained the basis of the comparative method up to this day. In the first part of this paper, I give a short account of how historical linguists have defended this principle and have dealt with apparent counter evidence. In the second part, I explore if a sound change can be regular if it is attested in one instance only. I conclude that it is, provided that the concomitant phonetic (and phonotactic) evidence supporting it is also based on regularity. If the single instance of a sound change is the result of developments which are all regular in themselves, it is still in line with the regularity principle.
Sound-changes and loanwords in Sungai Penuh Kerinci Steinhauer, Hein
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (499.374 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.708

Abstract

In this paper I shall (re)analyse the historical development of the Sungai Penuh variety of Kerinci in terms of sound-changes, with special attention to forms which deviate from the more common patterns. Data for this study have been taken from the stencilled version of Amir Hakim Usman’s Kerinci-Indonesian dictionary (1976) with handwritten annotations by the author, the late David John Prentice, and myself, the result of elicitation sessions with the author in 1977 in Leiden. Some additional data derived from Usman 1988 and from an interview with the author in 1999.
The Sekujam language of West Kalimantan (Indonesia) Collins, James; Herpanus, Herpanus
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (995.704 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.702

Abstract

Almost two hundred years ago, O. van Kessel identified a language group based on a characteristic sound change that yielded -ai in the final position of some words (Van Kessel 1850: 166); Hudson (1970) named this group “Ibanic” after the Iban language widely spoken in Sarawak. Of the numerous members of the Ibanic branch of Malayic, perhaps the Sekujam language is the least known. Although Sujarni et al. (2008: 282-285) provided information about the location and traditions of the Sekujam ethnic group, there is very little information about the language. Based on available colonial and contemporary sources, this essay provides a sketch of this ethnic group, numbering perhaps only 3,000 people, split between two administrative units (residencies). Then, a brief overview of the phonology of Sekujam suggests some of its distinctive characteristics. There follows an overview of the sociolinguistic setting of the Sekujam-speaking communities in the Sekadau residency reflecting the status and functions of Sekujam in the language ecology of this multilingual area. Of interest perhaps is the praxis of split dialogic bilingualism documented in some of the area’s villages and the role of Sekujam in traditional rituals of at least one other ethnic group. Much work remains in the face of rapid social, demographic and economic change.
Batik Jawa bagi Dunia; Javanese Batik to the World Kurnia, Lilawati
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (352.38 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.712

Abstract

Investigating Indonesian conversation; Approach and rationale Ewing, Michael Carter
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (283.48 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.701

Abstract

Colloquial Indonesian has often been described in terms of its differences from standard Indonesian, but with such an approach, aspects of informal language usage will go unexplored. This article proposes using the theoretical approach of Interactional Linguistics to more adequately describe the dynamic nature of Indonesian as actually used by its speakers. Interactional Linguistics emphasizes usage-based analysis of natural language data, especially conversation, in order to understand relationships between social actions and language structure. This article gives an overview of Interactional Linguistics, illustrated by two short English examples taken form the literature. It then presents an analysis of two aspects of Indonesian grammar – subject expression and clause structure – using an Interactional Linguistics approach to examine conversational data. By presenting an alternative analysis of two aspects of Indonesian grammar, this article aims to promote the use of Interactional Linguistics for examining
Preface wacana, wacana
Wacana Vol 19, No 2 (2018): Malayic language studies
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (196.654 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v19i2.753

Abstract

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