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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 17 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders" : 17 Documents clear
Uli Kozok, Utusan damai di kemelut perang; Peran zending dalam perang Toba. Jakarta: Yayasan Pustaka Obor Indonesia, École française d’Extrême-Orient, Pusat Studi Sejarah dan Ilmu-Ilmu Sosial Unimed, Sekolah Tinggi Teologi Jakarta, 2010, 219 pp. ISBN 978- Sunjayadi, Achmad
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (537.092 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.19

Abstract

The language attitude of border peoples Insular Riau, West Kalimantan, East Kalimantan, North Sulawesi, and the Eastern Sunda Islands Sugono, Dendy; Utomo, Imam Budi; Hardaniwati, Menuk; Subiyatningsih, Foriyani
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (603.669 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.14

Abstract

This research aims at describing (1) the language use of border area societies (Insular Riau, West Kalimantan, East Kalimantan, North Sulawesi, and the Eastern Sunda Islands) in terms of local language (BD), Indonesian (BI), and foreign language (BA) in the domains of family, society, and occupation, (2) language activity of border area societies relating to news observation, language attention, and language constraints in mass media, (3) language attitude of border area societies towards BD, BI, and BA. The findings are as follows. First, within the family and society at large, BD is more frequently used than BI and BA. This shows that BD functions in non-formal situations. In the professional field, however, BI is more frequently used than BD. Second, people in border provinces widely observe mass media, whether printed or electronic. They also often pay attention to the language the mass media uses. Third, border societies have a positive attitude towards BD as is shown (agree/totally agree) by the answers to eight questions relating to BD. The language attitude of border societies towards BI is positive based on the answers (agree/totally agree) to seven questions concerning BI. This also means that BI is prestigious for border people, especially in formal communication. The language attitude of border societies towards BA is mixed. In as far as it is negative it implies a positive evaluation of BD and BI because people appreciate them as part of their local and national identities.
Some introductory notes on the development and characteristics of Sabah Malay Hoogervorst, Tom G.
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (793.194 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.9

Abstract

This is a preliminary description of the Malay variety used as a lingua franca in the Malaysian state of Sabah at the northernmost top of Borneo. The paper discusses a number of common linguistic features that distinguish Sabah Malay from other Malay varieties and analyses these features from a historical linguistic perspective. While it is argued that Sabah Malay has a close historical relation with other Malay dialects spoken in Borneo, especially Brunei Malay, the vernacular is also influenced phonologically and lexically by Sabah’s indigenous and immigrant speech communities. Words and sentences recorded or elicited during fieldwork in various parts of Sabah illustrate these points.
Liesbeth Ouwehand, Herinneringen in beeld; Fotoalbums uit Nederlands-Indië. Leiden: KITLV Uitgeverij, 2009, 262 pp. + 200 photos. ISBN 978 90 6718 330 7. Price: EUR 24,90 (hard cover). Mursidah, Mursidah
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (308.829 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.18

Abstract

Contested meaning of the nation-state through historical border narratives A case study of the Batang Kanyau Iban, West Kalimantan Pirous, Iwan Meulia
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (277.695 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.13

Abstract

Nation as a cultural-psychological phenomenon is best understood in terms of how a sense of nationhood operates in order to construct social identities or a social imagination about the modern nation-state (Anderson 1983). The forging of nationalism as a national identity cannot be seen in isolation of the rise of modernization and industrialization (Gellner 1987). Although the nation appears to be a modern phenomenon, Smith (1991) stresses that every nation preserves its own past historical artefacts, narratives, and symbols for present-day needs. This model needs to be elaborated further as it is insufficient to understand how a sense of nationhood operates among borderlanders of a state. This paper relates the story of Kalimantan’s Iban borderlanders who are officially registered as Indonesian subjects but live on the dividing line between two countries. This makes them appear to be ambiguous subjects who are torn between the two different historical timelines of British and Dutch colonial history (as well as postcolonial Malaysian-Indonesian history). They are marginalized in every aspect and are the forgotten subjects in the history of the broader picture of Indonesia’s so-called nationalism project. The explanation is twofold. The first explains how identity is constructed as multi-layered historical narratives involving local and national cultures, and second, how transnational borderlanders give meaning to nation as narrative. The primary data for this article were collected in 2002 through a series of interviews in the village of Benua Sadap, an Iban settlement on the Batang Kanyau River, close to the West Kalimantan (Indonesia) and Sarawak (Malaysia) borderline.
Crossing the border Historical and linguistic divides among the Bunaq in central Timor Schapper, Antoinette
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2139.482 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.8

Abstract

The Bunaq are a Papuan language-speaking people straddling the border of Indonesian West Timor and independent East Timor. This paper looks at the history of the Bunaq as a “border“ people in Timor.  “Border“ is interpreted here in two ways, as referring to: (i) a political division, the boundary line separating one country from another, and (ii) a linguistic division, the distinguishing line between Papuan and Austronesian languages. I examine the effect that the Bunaq position at the political and linguistic borders of Timor has had on the people and their language.
René T.A. Lysloff, Srikandhi dances lènggèr; A performanca of music and shadow theater in Central Java. Leiden: KITLV Press, 2009, viii + 571 pp. [Verhandelingen 248.] ISBN 978-90-6718-298-0. Price: EUR 39,50 (soft cover). Meij, Dick van der
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (526.278 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.17

Abstract

Preface Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia, editor
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.21

Abstract

The theme of this issue of Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 13No. 1 (April 2011) is “Charting borders”. It may be better to say that it is an attempt to chart borders as cultural, linguistic and social interaction usually do not adhere to geographical boundaries on a map. Borders, on the other hand, can be seen as symbols of demarcation that define people within those borders belonging to a particular state, nation or region. This contradiction between set administrative boundaries that demarcate geographical areas and the elusiveness of borders when it comes to social interaction in all its aspects, creates new diversity that you may explore when you read the articles in this present issue.
Tony Day and Maya H.T. Liem (eds), Cultures at war; The Cold War and cultural expressions in Southeast Asia. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2010, vii + 287 pp. ISBN 978-0-877-27751-4. Price: USD 25.95 (soft cover). Budianta, Melani
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (397.581 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.20

Abstract

A people-state negotiation in a borderland A case study of the Indonesia–Malaysia frontier in Sebatik Island Puryanti, Lina; Husain, Sarkawi B.
Wacana Vol 13, No 1 (2011): Charting borders
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1197.278 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wjhi.v13i1.11

Abstract

This paper aims to show the dynamics of the Indonesian – Malaysian border area in Sebatik Island, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Take into account as a background is the territorial dispute between Indonesia and Malaysia over the Ligitan and Sipadan Islands which were awarded to Malaysia by the decision of the ICJ (International Court of Justice) in 2002, which was followed by the dispute over the Ambalat sea block in 2005. Sebatik Island is geographically very strategic since it faces the disputed areas. Therefore the concerns of the Indonesian state with regard to the island pertain to issues of nation-state sovereignty and territorial security, which she tries to safeguard through intensive campaigns. Research conducted in Sebatik in 2009 showed how people willingly reinforced the state by incorporating its programs, despite their ambiguous position as people in a border area, which support they used subsequently in negotiating with the state for their own local purpose.

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