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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku" : 12 Documents clear
Oral traditions in cryptic song lyrics; Continuous cultural revitalization in Batuley Gordon, A. Ross; Djonler, Sonny A.
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (385.619 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.757

Abstract

Oral knowledge and teachings are referenced but not salient in cryptic song lyrics sung at ritual festivals in Batuley villages of the Aru Islands in Eastern Indonesia. The article examines the relation of the lyrics in songs to associated teachings and how they are vitalized and transmitted over centuries with veracity. Song teachings relate to pearl oyster and sea cucumber harvests, and cosmological beliefs associated with the Maluku Siwa-Lima trade-based moiety system, which took on a unique form in the Aru Islands. Song-related teachings demonstrate cultural adaptations giving meaning to centuries of peripheral engagement in hemispheric trade networks by a geographically isolated community. The article evaluates the role of historical truth in building community and identity within a minority culture and language group.
The lives of things on Pulau Ujir; Aru’s engagement with commercial expansion Whittaker, Joss R.
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (301.215 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.760

Abstract

In places with limited access to manufactured goods, people must develop creative strategies to make the most of available materials, both those produced by humans and those taken from the natural world. Although Pulau Ujir, in the Aru Islands, has a long history of engagement with global trade networks, until recently the community?s access to manufactured goods was limited and infrequent. As a result, in the past objects there tended to take on new lives, and still do today: they are modified, re-purposed, and recycled in ingenious ways. This article explores the relationship between people and things in Ujir from the perspectives of object biography and Actor Network Theory. I argue that the complex ?life stories? of material things in such conditions of scarcity deserve special attention, because they may explain not only puzzling archaeological phenomena, but also aspects of the social lives of the people who used andreused them. Two modified and repurposed fragments, one of porcelain and one of glass, serve as examples.
A reflection on a peripheral movement; The “Save Aru” social movement 2013-2015 from a historical perspective Sahrasad, Herdi; Chaidar, Al; Syam, Maksum
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (301.714 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.723

Abstract

This article examines the struggle of the Aru Islands community to preserve their forests and their natural environment in the shape of the ?Save Aru? social movement from 2013 to 2015. Today this social movement is still alive and kicking. In 2010, the Aru Islands community was taken by surprise by the plan of a private corporation (PT Menara Group or PT MG) to annex forest areas in the Aru Islands in order to convert them into sugar-cane plantations. Their outrage at this plan spurred the citizens of Aru to fight the might of this corporate and preserve their forests and environment. Not all has gone smoothly as the civil society movement in Aru has been divided into pro-splitting and counter-splitting on a regional division agenda. Meanwhile, this exploitative business has become a scourge for the Aru people who want to preserve their forests and the environment as a whole. Thanks to the campaign, environmental awareness appears to be growing rather than abating among the Aru Islands community. Young people in the Aru have been sharing their stories about the natural resources around them under threat from the power of private corporate capital with friends, family, and neighbours. The danger of deforestation by private corporations is a problem and a challenge that must be faced by all communities, whether they be Aru, Indonesian, or international, who care about the preservation of the forests in the Aru Islands as a ?lung? of the world, helping to reduce the effects of global warming and the ozone depletion.
Yanwar Pribadi (2018), Islam, state and society in Indonesia; Local politics in Madura Mahfud, Choirul
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.773 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.720

Abstract

Yanwar Pribadi, Islam, state and society in Indonesia; Local politics in Madura. New York: Routledge, 2018, 222 pp. ISBN 9781315473697. Price: GBP 33.29 (softcover).
Money and masohi; An anthropological review of copra commodity management Rudyansjah, Tony; Tihurua, Ode Zulkarnain Sahji
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (242.03 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.700

Abstract

In discussions on exchange, money is often seen as a medium of exchange and a universal equivalent in the circulation of commodities, as well as an object in gift exchange. Yet, in the case of the management of copra that we researched on the island of Seram, money becomes a factor in shaping a dynamic of gift continuity and transformation in the realm of the copra economy (in this context of masohi custom). It is money that promotes both the use and erosion of masohi custom. Masohi is a tradition of community work on the island of Seram and is based on non-capitalist social relations and the principal of reciprocal exchange. This article seeks to describe how money,originally a capitalist medium, serves to simultaneously preserve and transform masohi custom, which, at its essence, is a non-capitalist institution.
Gerard Termorshuizen and Coen van ’t Veer (2018), Een groots en meeslepend leven; Dominique Berretty – Indisch persmagnaat Snoek, Kees
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.548 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.792

Abstract

Gerard Termorshuizen and Coen van ?t Veer, Een groots en meeslepend leven; Dominique Berretty ? Indisch persmagnaat. With the cooperation of Sjoerd Meihuizen. Zutphen: Walburg Pers, 2018, 288 pp., illustrations. ISBN: 978-9462493155. Price: EUR 19.95 (softcover).
Tamalola; Transregional connectivities, Islam, and anti-colonialism on an Indonesian island Hägerdal, Hans; Wellfelt, Emilie
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (383.497 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.802

Abstract

The present study focuses on a set of events in the Aru Islands, Maluku, in the late eighteenth century which are documented in some detail by Dutch records. A violent rebellion with Muslim and anti-European overtones baffled the Dutch colonialists (VOC) and led to a series of humiliations for the Company on Aru, before eventually being subdued. As one of the main catalysts of the conflict stands the chief Tamalola from the Muslim island Ujir. Interestingly, this persons also a central figure in local traditions from Ujir. Moreover, his story connects with wider cultural and economic networks in eastern Indonesia. Thus the article asks how the imprints of the Tamalola figure in textual and non-textual sources can add to our knowledge of how communities of Eastern Indonesia ordered their lives outside colonial control.
Ding Choo Ming and Willem van der Molen (eds), 2018, Traces of the Ramayana and Mahabharata in Javanese and Malay Literature Meij, Dick van der
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (144.541 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.791

Abstract

Ding Choo Ming and Willem van der Molen (eds), Traces of the Ramayana and Mahabharata in Javanese and Malay Literature. Singapore: ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute, 2018, 229 pp. ISBN 978-981-4786-57-7 (softcover), 978-981-4786-58-4 (E-book PDF). Price: USD 29.90 (softcover).
Between resistance and co-operation; Contact zones in Aru Islands in the VOC period Hägerdal, Hans
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (296.525 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.803

Abstract

The article is focused on early colonial interaction with the Aru Islands, geographically located in southern Maluku, at the easternmost end of the Indian Ocean world. The study examines how relationships were constructed in the course of the seventeenth century, how they were institutionalized and how this engendered forms of hybridity. Moreover, it discusses forms of resistance and avoidance in relation to the Dutch East India Company (VOC). Aru constitutes an interesting case as it is was one of the easternmost places in the world in which Islam and Christianity gained a (limited) foothold in the early-modern period, and it also marked the outer limit of Dutch authority. Aru differed from most geographical areas approached by the VOC because of its lack of any large-scale political structures and its relatively non-hierarchical society. The article discusses the forging of Dutch-Arunese political ties after the Banda massacre in 1621, as well as the role of Asian competitors of the VOC such as the Makassarese and Ceramese, the increasing adaptation to world religions in an Arunese setting, conditions in the European-indigenous contact zones and, finally, the conflicts arising from the imbalances between western and eastern Aru, in which the VOC repeatedly intervened to suppress the villages of the Backshore (east coast).
Human foraging responses to climate change; Here Sorot Entapa rockshelter on Kisar Island Kaharudin, Hendri Asyhari Fajrian; Mahirta, Mahirta; Kealy, Shimona; Hawkins, Stuart; Boulanger, Clara; O'Connor, Sue
Wacana Vol 20, No 3 (2019): Society and history in Central and Southern Maluku
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (803.001 KB) | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v20i3.783

Abstract

This study explores prehistoric human subsistence adaptations within the context of changing marine and terrestrial environments on the tiny Island of Kisar, beginning during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition around 15,000 years ago (ka). We use zooarchaeological data on faunal remains (vertebrates and invertebrates) recovered from Here Sorot Entapa rockshelter (HSE) in temporal relationship to climate data from Flores to document prehistoric human responses to regional sea-level, temperature, and associated habitat changes that occurred after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Human settlement intensity peaked during the colder drier conditions of the Bølling-Allerød period at 14.4-13 ka, and the site was abandoned during a period of unstable sea levels and coastal habitats between 9.4-5 ka. Holocene climate change coincides with increased reefal subsistence, and an increase in crab exploitation over sea urchin use. Rodent abundance increases in the early Holocene, possibly in response to expanding forests during warmer wetter conditions, with a significant increase in the late Holocene as a result of the human introduction of exotic species to the island.

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