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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I" : 16 Documents clear
The list of Waruno Mahdi’s publications Hoogervorst, Tom; Engelenhoven, Aone van; Moeimam, Susi
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1075

Abstract

South Borneo as an ancient Sprachbund area Adelaar, Alexander
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.963

Abstract

In South and Central Kalimantan (southern Borneo) there are some unusual linguistic features shared among languages which are adjacent but do not belong to the same genetic linguistic subgroups. These languages are predominantly Banjar Malay (a Malayic language), Ngaju (a West Barito language), and Ma’anyan (a Southeast Barito language). The same features also appear to some degree in Malagasy, a Southeast Barito language in East Africa. The shared linguistic features are the following ones: a grammaticalized form of the originally Malay noun buah ‘fruit’ expressing affectedness, nasal spreading in which N- not only nasalizes the onset of the first syllable but also a *y in the next syllable, a non-volitional marker derived from the Banjar Malay prefix combination ta-pa- (related to Indonesian tər- + pər-), and the change from Proto Malayo-Polynesian *s to h (or Malagasy Ø). These features have their origins in the various members of the language configuration outlined above and form a Sprachbund or “Linguistic Area”. The concept of Linguistic Area is weak and difficult to define. Lyle Campbell (2002) considers it little else than borrowing or diffusion and writes it off as “no more than [a] post hoc attempt [..] to impose geographical order on varied conglomerations of [….] borrowings”. While mindful of its shortcomings, the current author still uses the concept as a useful tool to distinguish between inherited and borrowed commonalities. In the configuration of languages currently under discussion it also provides a better understanding of the linguistic situation in South Borneo at a time prior to the Malagasy migrations to East Africa (some thirteen centuries ago).
About Waruno Mahdi; From Bogor to Berlin Veldhuijzen, Maarten Leonard
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1071

Abstract

The particle "ma" in Old Sundanese Gunawan, Aditia; Fauziyah, Evi Fuji
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1040

Abstract

This article will analyse the distribution of the particle ma in Old Sundanese texts. Based on an examination of fifteen Old Sundanese texts (2 inscriptions, 8 prose texts, and 5 poems), we have identified 730 occurrences of ma. We have selected several examples which represent the range of its grammatical functions in sentences. Our observations are as follows: (1) ma not only appears in direct dialogues, but also in narrative texts, both prose and verse; (2) ma functions as a copula in nominal sentences, connecting subject and predicate; (3) in conditional clauses containing the conjunction lamun, ma has a function similar to that of mah in Modern Sundanese but, in the absence of lamun and if the supplementary clauses only consist of verb phrases, ma itself is also capable of expressing conditionality; (4) if this particle is preceded by negations such as hamo ‘not’ or hantə‘there is not’ in conditional clauses, ma is placed directly after these negations and does not mark the predicate, but serves instead to stress the negation itself; (5) in the cases described in points 1-4, ma can be considered a topic marker, and in some phrases we have even found the dislocationsthat are characteristic of topic markers; and (6) ma can appear in imperative sentences, placed immediately after verbs to emphasize commands, which does not apply to mah in Modern Sundanese.
"Kanala, tamaaf, tramkassie, en stuur krieslam"; Lexical and phonological echoes of Malay in Cape Town Hoogervorst, Tom
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.953

Abstract

This article traces a largely forgotten Malay dialect which was historically in use among South African Muslims of Southeast Asian origin. Its use reached its pinnacle in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. Some elements of the Cape Malay grammar, especially its phonology, can be reconstructed through early- and mid-twentieth-century documents, most of which were written by outsiders when it was no longer passed on as a first language. When read linguistically, these sources reveal that the Malay of Cape Town resembled that of Batavia, Eastern Indonesia, and Sri Lanka. In a later developmental stage, Cape Malay adopted linguistic features from other languages spoken in the Western Cape. Yet influence took place in multiple directions and several non-standard varieties of Afrikaans exhibit lexical influence from Malay. As such, Cape Malay language history is relevant to those interested in Southeast Asia as well as South Africa.
Iban as a koine language in Sarawak Shin, Chong
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.985

Abstract

This article attempts to delineate the issue of linguistic homogeny in Iban variants in Sarawak (Malaysia). In brief, the Iban speakers are claimed to descend from Upper Kapuas watershed, Western Kalimantan (Indonesia). Based on local traditions and oral materials, this ethnic group began to move out from Kapuas watershed and penetrate into Sarawak in sixteenth century. After several generations, they expanded to become the major ethnic group in the state. Several recent studies show that the number of ethnic Ibans in West Kalimantan is fairly small and the distribution of Iban communities often displays a pattern of distant pockets or enclaves. The purpose of this article is to explain how a minority group became a majority ethnic group in a newly settled territory. This article argues that this research question is strongly related to the ethnonym of “Iban” and regional dialect levelling or koineization. During the initial stage of the migration, the term “Iban” was an exonym. By the mid-twentieth century, the exonym “Iban” or “Sea Dayak” was gradually becoming an endonym. The change in the status of this ethnonym has enlarged the population size of the “Iban” in Sarawak. The existence of several Iban-like ethnic groups in Sarawak, for example, the Balau, Remun, Kantu’, Milikin, and Kumpang, adds support to this argument. This article revisits the issue of linguistic homogeny of the Iban language, taking the language koineization approach. A phonological analysis on the Ibanic varieties spoken in West Kalimantan offer a possible explanation that the Iban variants in Sarawak have appeared as a stable linguistic variety as a result of “dialect levelling” and “simplification”. Furthermore, the development of koine Iban seems to fulfil several features in the koine developmental continua proposed by J. Siegel (1985).
Waruno Mahdi: seeker of Austronesian mysteries Engelenhoven, Aone van
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1072

Abstract

"Babaring lelakon"; The use of "-ing" in Javanese genitive constructions Krauße, Daniel
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1032

Abstract

Two nominals in a genitive construction in Javanese are typically linked by the suffix ‑é in the low speech level and by ‑ipun in the high level, both of which are derived from the third person possessive suffix. There is a third suffix which links two nominals, namely ‑ing, which has so far received little intention in the literature. In this paper, I present a syntactic and historical analysis of the suffix -ing. Of particular concern are four types of genitive constructions which permit the use of ‑ing, as opposed to two constructions where this suffix cannot be used.
Islamic cultural and Arabic linguistic influence on the languages of Nusantara; From lexical borrowing to localized Islamic lifestyles Mahfud, Choirul; Astari, Rika; Kasdi, Abdurrohman; Mu'ammar, Muhammad Arfan; Muyasaroh, Muyasaroh; Wajdi, Firdaus
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.914

Abstract

This article reviews the breadth of the influence of Arabic on the languages of Nusantara, from the early arrival of Islam in the archipelago to the modern era. Focusing on both linguistics and culture, we pay attention to precolonial exchanges, regional languages – in particular Bima, Sasak, Javanese, Sundanese, and Bugis – and the recent influence of Arabic and Islamic culture on the development of technological products, Islamic financial systems, and Islamic lifestyles in contemporary Indonesia. From era to era, Arabic has not only played a role in enriching the vocabulary of the languages of Nusantara, it has also contributed to the social, religious, educational, literary, philosophical, legal, political, scientific, and cultural domains.  
My tribute to Waruno Mahdi Zorc, R. David
Wacana Vol 22, No 1 (2021): Languages of Nusantara I
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i1.1073

Abstract

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