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Wacana: Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : 10.17510
Core Subject : Humanities, Social,
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a scholarly journal accredited by Decree of the Directorate General of Research Reinforcement and Development, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia No. 60/E/KPT/2016, 13 November 2016. This journal of the Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, is a medium for scholarly discussion, description, and surveys concerning literature, linguistics, archaeology, history, philosophy, library and information studies, religion, art, and interdisciplinary studies. The journal is published twice a year.
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Articles 548 Documents
The song of Samsu Tabriz in Ronggasasmita’s "Suluk Acih" Florida, Nancy
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1080

Abstract

The article contributes an excerpt from the Karaton Surakarta poet Ronggasasmita’s Suluk Kutub (also known as Suluk Samsu Tabriz) along with an annotated translation of the text into English. Suluk Kutub is one of the metaphysical poems that belong to this Sufi poet’s Suluk Acih, a text that he compiled in Aceh in 1815. The poem is a Javanese rendition of the meeting of Jalaluddin Rumi (Jav. Mulana Amir Kaji Rum) with his beloved, Shamsuddin Tabrizi (Jav. Samsu Tabriz). The commentary forms a short meditation on, and guide to, the specific practices of translating Javanese poetry into English – performed in part in dialogue with Ronggasasmita.
The drum in the mosque; A modern short story by Djajus Pete Quinn, George
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1079

Abstract

The short story “Bedhug” (The drum in the mosque) by Djajus Pete (born 1948) was first published in the Javanese-language magazine Panjebar Semangat in 1997. It describes what happens in a small village when well-intentioned local people unsuccessfully attempt to replace an old mosque drum with a bigger, more resonant one. In many Muslim communities, the call to prayer is made by beating a drum in the mosque’s vestibule. The story gives a glimpse of how Islam is changing, and not changing, in Java. It is critical of village institutions and functionaries, but also humorous and deeply affectionate.
Rethinking the name; The problem of the name "Candrakiraṇa" in the oldest Javanese prosody Aminullah, Zakariya Pamuji
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.996

Abstract

The oldest written text in Javanese literature is Candrakiraṇa, one of its parts, the Amaramālā, mentions “Indra” as a king of the Śailendra dynasty. This work is essential because it includes various elements of prosody which the authors of kakawin needed to compose their literary work. For many years, some Javanese scholars had been debating the proper name of this text, using only one manuscript, LOr 4570, a copy of the incomplete gebang manuscript from the PNRI, which does not have a prologue or an epilogue mentioning its precise name. However, a reading L 298, a lontar in the Merapi-Merbabu Collection, this manuscript clearly demonstrates that the name of this oldest text is Candrakiraṇa. This begs the question is there any relationship between the name and the content itself? This article presents pertinent arguments indicating that the name proposed can be accounted for both factually and conceptually.
Princess Sodara Kartika frees Amir from prison; The epic of Amir Hamza (?16th century) Arps, Bernard
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1077

Abstract

MS Jav. b. 2 (R) is among the earliest Javanese manuscripts brought to Europe by seafarers. It was presented to the Bodleian Library, Oxford, in 1629. Its text – titled Stories of Amir (Caritanira Amir) – sheds new light on the literary and cultural history of Java and the wider Java Sea world. Probably composed in the 1500s, possibly in Banten, the text contains part of an adaptation of the Malay Hikayat Amir Hamzah, itself a rendition of an eleventh-century text in Persian. The protagonist Hamza was an uncle of the Prophet Muhammad. His epic story used to be told across Islamic Asia in a range of literary and performance genres. The text is Javanized not only in its language but also its poetics and (selectively) its natural and cultural settings. Among other things, Caritanira Amir helps to clarify the relationship between Middle and Modern Javanese, and it problematizes social, political, and religious issues that were evidently of concern in the early modern Java Sea world. Several appear in the excerpt presented here.
Flora and fauna based on Old Javanese literary reading in the Malang Highlands Region Suprapta, Blasius
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.962

Abstract

Towards the end of the twelfth century (1104 Ś = AD 1182) until the middle of the fourteenth (1281 Ś = AD 1359), a Hindu-Buddhist civilization, consisting of, the Akuwu of Tumapĕl - the kingdom of Siŋhasari – and the kingdom of Majapahit, developed a well-organized social and cultural life in the Malang Highlands region of Java. This included the management of natural resources flora and fauna. Although their variety has been well documented in Old Javanese literature and inscriptions, so far there has not been an in-depth study identifying the diversity of flora and fauna of the region during the late Hindu-Buddhist era. This is a study of diverse flora and fauna and how people managed these resources based on reading the source of Old Javanese literature. It begins with library research, followed by diplomatic analysis of various types of flora and fauna in Old Javanese inscriptions, zoological analysis, ethno-zoology, and geographical spatial analysis. The results of the study include the use of various types of flora and fauna in sima ceremonies and everyday agricultural activities. One type of flora, alang-alang (Imperata) which thrives on Gunung Lĕjar, was controlled by the state as it was a fire-risk. Alang-alang was an important, thatching material. The trade in endemic plants, herbs, and spices, was protected and regulated by the state. It is also known that the profits from tropical forest management in Bantaran were used for the maintenance of sacred buildings: prāsāda in Hĕmad.
A "wali’s" quest for guidance; The Islamic genealogies of the "Seh Mlaya" Meyer, Verena
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1084

Abstract

The Seh Mlaya is a narrative tradition of Sunan Kalijaga’s conversion and becoming a wali that is well-known for its drawing on a pre-Islamic narrative and discursive legacies. In this article, I explore the Islamic genealogies of the narrative as told in a Surakarta manuscript (RP 333). I argue that the author uses the verse narrative to articulate two prominent, yet seemingly opposed, intellectual and spiritual traditions in Islamic Java and the relation between them: the speculative and ecstatic teachings of the Sufi lineage of the Syattariyah on the one hand, and Ghazālī’s work with its emphasis on obedience and the purification of the soul on the other. Sunan Kalijaga’s quest narratively holds together these two currents and even gestures at a transcendence of their difference as Sunan Kalijaga’s efforts, even as they fail, lead to his realization of guidance.
Prophets, "pegon", and piety; The Javanese "Layang Ambiya" Ricci, Ronit
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1081

Abstract

The tales of the prophets are among the most popular textual traditions across the Islamic world and Java proves no exception. Beginning with the first human and first prophet Nabi Adam, these often-vast collections recount the biographies of all those viewed as prophets in Islam, ultimately leading up to the “seal of the prophets”, Muhammad. Many manuscripts of this genre were composed and copied in Javanese, in different periods, locales, and milieus, opening a window to how these core Islamic stories and the messages they carry were understood and transmitted in Java. The essay explores one example, a Layang Ambiya composed in the pĕsantren milieu in the mid-nineteenth century and written in pegon (MSB L12), currently housed in the Museum Sonobudoyo, Yogyakarta.
Metaphor in "Sĕrat cariyos ringgit purwa lampahan Dora Wĕca mawi sĕkar macapat" by Raden Mas Panji Arja Suparta Muslifah, Siti
Wacana Vol 22, No 3 (2021): Reading Javanese literature
Publisher : Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17510/wacana.v22i3.1082

Abstract

The Sĕrat cariyos ringgit purwa lampahan Dora Wĕca mawi sĕkar macapat is an example of a translation of a wayang play into poetry, a popular phenomenon in the late nineteenth century. To create aesthetic effects Raden Mas Panji Arja Suparta, the author of the text, makes ample use of metaphors. Some of these metaphors are well-known literary clichés. Others, which are woven into riddles (wangsalan), bring the real world of everyday life in Java vividly into view.

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