cover
Contact Name
Arie Afriansyah
Contact Email
arie.afriansyah@ui.ac.id
Phone
+6278880075
Journal Mail Official
ijil@ui.ac.id
Editorial Address
Universitas Indonesia Kampus Depok, Jl. Prof. Mr Djokosoetono, Pondok Cina, Beji, Depok, Jawa Barat 16424
Location
Kota depok,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of International Law
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 16935594     EISSN : 23565527     DOI : https://doi.org/10.17304/ijil.vol18.4.824
Core Subject : Social,
IJIL is intended to promote international law in Indonesia and to build the interest of scholars and decision-makers in the important role of international law in developing the rule-based international community. IJIL is intended to serve as an academic discussion forum on the development of international law in Indonesia and in the region. We welcome scholars and practitioners to contribute to IJIL in shaping the rule-based international community. IJIL offers current academic debates on the development of the field from the viewpoints of/or about Indonesia and other parts of Asia and the developing world at large. Each issue of IJIL accepts manuscripts on conceptual, theoretical, and practical topics published on a thematic basis. IJIL invites writers to their views that would strengthen the role and effectiveness of international law in an exploratory and non-descriptive style.
Arjuna Subject : Ilmu Sosial - Hukum
Articles 466 Documents
VIOLATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW BY THE GOVERNMENT OF AUSTRALIA IN PRACTICE OF TURN BACK THE BOAT MANAGEMENT POLICY FOR ASYLUM SEEKERS Jufri, Modhy Mahardika
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 14, No. 2
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1278.965 KB)

Abstract

Conflicts in several countries in Asia resulted in increasing number of refugees and asylum seekers. The need for protection and a decent life makes them willing to take any way to get protection in other countries, including by being illegal migrants. Australia, as a destination country for asylum seekers, imposed Operation Sovereign Borders by intercepting and returning ships carrying asylum seekers to protect the border while reducing the rate of illegal migrants coming into the country. In practice, this policy violates various provisions of international law, namely the principle of non-refoulement, human rights law, SAR obligation, the handling of migrant smuggling and violations of Indonesia sovereignty.
Completing the Jigsaw: The Recent Development of the Maritime Boundaries in the Timor Sea Ramon, Adrianus Adityo Vito
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 15, No. 4
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3069.781 KB)

Abstract

The research argues that recent events, including the independence of Timor-Leste and the positive outcome of the Timor-Leste – Australia compulsory conciliation proceeding have provided Indonesia with political as well as, potentially legal basis to strive for the negotiation of its maritime boundary in the vicinity of Timor Sea with Timor-Leste as well as to pursue for the renegotiation of the 1997 Perth Treaty between Indonesia and Australia (yet to be entered into force) as the area that being delimited by the said treaty currently encompassed the maritime area of Timor-Leste. The research furthermore argues that a similar condition had also occurred for the other coastal states in the vicinity of Timor Sea (Australia, and Timor-Leste). The series of events between the coastal states of Timor Sea have arguably provided those coastal states with a perfect and timely setting to strive for the conclusion of its maritime delimitation dispute and therefore completing the jigsaw of maritime boundaries in the Timor Sea.
Achieving Multilateral Investment Court Through EU-ASEAN Expansion of Bilateral Investment ‘Court’: Is It Possible? Permana, Rizky Banyualam
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 4
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (413.899 KB)

Abstract

Legitimacy of international investment law is in crisis. One particular area of international investment law that has been progressively re-developed is the area of investment dispute settlement. The EU sees the multilateral investment court as a proper solution to reform ISDS in the future. To achieve this final goal, starting from the bilateral level, the EU has included investment court provisions as an ISDS mechanism in its latest trade and investment agreement with its trading partners, among others, EU-Viet Nam FTA and IPA, as well as EU-Singapore FTA & IPA. This paper addresses central questions on how could existing investment court system in EU and ASEAN member states’ Investment Protection Agreements (IPA) can be expanded towards multilateral investment court in the future, and what are the challenges that can be expected from such expansion. It critically analyses concluded agreements between the EU and some of ASEAN Member States. I argue that for now, it is unlikely that multilateral investment court expansion will happen soon considering the challenges and concerns expressed by both sides.
Revisiting U.S – China Aggressive Use of Outer Space: A Comprehensive International Law Outlook Towards Military Activities in Outer Space Muhammad, Alif Nurfakhri
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 4
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (653.756 KB)

Abstract

Outer Space, as the area on which freedom of use is guaranteed by the Treaty, creates a condition in which nations conduct their military activities. These activities however, were only limited to those conducted using nuclear weapons and/or containing nuclear materials. The principle of Peaceful Uses of Outer Space has been proven inadequate to regulate these activities. This has resulted to launches of weapons to Outer Space to destroy satellites, as conducted by the United States and China. These launches, whatever the purposes are, may cause hazardous repercussion to other State’s activity in Outer Space. This article will comprehensively elaborate on related International Law and other measures which regulate military activities in Outer Space, especially on the launch of non-nuclear weaponry under any purposes. From these analyses, we can conclude that however inadequate the Outer Space Treaty article’s stipulation in the matter, there are other stipulations of international law that we can gather that regulates military activity in Outer Space.
Small Claims Court Mechanism in Business Dispute Resolution as an Attempt to Apply Fast-Track Basis in the District Courts and its Comparison with Some Countries Retnaningsih, Sonyendah; Velentina, Rouli Anita
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 4
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (668.747 KB)

Abstract

The implementation of Small Claims court mechanism according to Supreme Court Regulation (PERMA) Number 2/2015 concerning Procedures for Small-Claims Court Resolution recently granted a breakthrough in the civil justice system particularly in Indonesia. It was reached by the Supreme Court in order to reduce the court burden against cases with disputes below IDR 200 million rupiah. The disputes resolution by Small Claims court mechanism is done by a single judge assisted with registrar and must completed within 25 working days, the final decision is binding, thus unable to ask for appeal or judicial review. This article tries to comprehend dispute resolution through Small Claims mechanism in several state courts, such as Medan district Court, Palu, and the Jember. The study, also aims to comprehend the comparison of Small Claims mechanism in Indonesia and small claims in the Netherlands and UK in business disputes resolution. The study employs a normative juridical method. Based on the studies, the implementation through Small Claims court mechanism in Indonesia has been carried out in accordance with the Supreme Court Regulation Number 2/2015. Comparison on business dispute resolution using Small Claims court mechanism in Indonesia and in Netherlands and UK proof that the proof mechanisms whether in Indonesia, Netherlands and United Kingdom relatively simple. Legal remedies for Small Claims decision in Indonesia and the verdict in the Netherlands and in England are limited. The distinction is that the case number in Indonesia is higher than the number in the Netherlands and England.
Foreign Direct Investment Restriction Policy as an Effort to Empower Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Zulfikar, Ary
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 4
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (521.679 KB)

Abstract

Foreign Direct Investment is one of the important means to increase a country’s economic growth through equitable development. However, countries such as Indonesia, often put restrictions on their foreign investment policies. The purposes of this research are: 1) to explain the restrictive policies which are imposed upon foreign investments in Indonesia and to compare them to those of other countries in Asia; 2) to explain the practical impact of such restrictive policies on foreign investments in Indonesia. The author uses a qualitative-descriptive research method. The research is also conducted through a juridical normative approach. This research shows that: 1) Restrictions on foreign investment is regulated under the Presidential Regulation of the Republic of Indonesia No. 76 of 2007 on Criteria and Requirements for Formulation of Business Fields Closed to Investment and Business Fields Conditionally Open to Investment; 2) In its implementation, Presidential Regulation No. 76 of 2007 has not yet been able to boost sustainable economic growth evenly via the empowerment of MSMEs or domestic investors.
Moving Cultures: Engaging Refugee and Migrant Culture Rights in International Heritage Law Lixinski, Lucas
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 1
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (510.094 KB)

Abstract

In thinking about the rise of the Anthropocene, an important facet of this looming new era remains under-explored: namely, how cultural identity, and its tangible and intangible markers, are to be renegotiated and protected. Notwithstanding that the origins of international heritage law lie in protecting heritage in times of crisis (wartime and natural or man-made disasters), regimes under UNESCO for safeguarding cultural heritage in international law are ill-prepared for the challenges of the Anthropocene. A particular question that needs to be considered is the protection in international law of cultural heritage and identity when communities are displaced from their homes. Because international cultural heritage law is connected to state territoriality, states have the ultimate authorizing power over the meanings and uses of cultural heritage. In the past, this power has at times been used to the detriment of minority groups contesting the majoritarian state. But how might this power play out in a context where communities are forced to move? What, if anything, can international heritage law do to ensure that these populations, who have already lost their homes and livelihoods, can maintain their cultural identity through the protection of their heritage? I argue that international law’s separation between the cultural and biological facets of human existence presents a major obstacle to safeguarding the cultures of migrant and refugee groups, ultimately frustrating the very objectives that this separation was meant to achieve, namely, the protection of these populations. Only by reintegrating biology and culture can international law create the means for reimagining civilization in the Anthropocene.
Cultural Heritage Protection as a Security Issue in the 21st Century: Recent Developments von Schorlemer, Sabine
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 1
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (650.022 KB)

Abstract

Throughout history, cultural property has permanently been at risk in armed conflict as belligerents always aimed at razing to the ground or plundering the enemy’s cultural heritage. Cultural property is a war victim time and again, either by armed attack or by collateral damage. This background opens the way for new insights into research on cultural heritage protection as a security issue in the 21st century. In order to fight the root causes of heritage destruction and extremism, UNESCO is advocating strongly a comprehensive approach, using also its “soft power” across the Organization’s mandate. Thus, despite its limited resources, UNESCO is an important actor in promoting a culture of peace, justice and tolerance on a worldwide scale.
Military Application of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles: In Quest of A New Legal Regime? Nainggolan, Jeremia Humolong Prasetya
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 1
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (462.079 KB)

Abstract

The Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV) is commonly used for current military operations. There are three legal issues arising out of it, namely (i) legal status; (ii) immunity; and (iii) configuration and rule of the road. The international community has also witnessed the impact of the unregulated UUVs military operation. The article will examined these legal issues in the perspective of international and national law and States practice. To enrich the discussion, legal scholars and practitioners views on UUV will be included. The capability of UUV will also be discussed to increase the comprehension of its role in military operations. Based on existing regulations, either in the international or national law, UUV is not expressly regulated. Furthermore, numerous State react to and/or conduct military application of UUV differently. Hence, it can be suggested that in preventing more incidents, UUVs need to be regulated, either in new regulations or amendment to existing regulation. If it is not possible, states can be urged by the international community and other relevant stakeholders to adopt best standard or practice in their national regulation.
Alternatives to Immigration Detentions With Particular Focus on Children Jakuleviciene, Lyra
Indonesian Journal of International Law Vol. 16, No. 1
Publisher : UI Scholars Hub

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (458.028 KB)

Abstract

Immigration detention is costly, ineffective and raises a number of human rights concerns. Numerous studies have demonstrated the detrimental effect of such detention on states and individuals. This prompted the States to search for alternative solutions that would, on the one hand – assist in reaching the objectives of migration control of foreigners on their territories, on the other – ensure that human rights of migrants and refugees are not undermined. Although various legal models of alternatives to detention (ATDs) already exist, the alternatives are still finding obstacles on their way to legislation and practice of various States. The research paper dwells into the newest developments in international law and State practice with regard to regulation, application and challenges of ATDs taking into consideration the particular situation of unaccompanied minors. It focuses on the analysis of the benefits and setbacks of ATDs available throughout different regions of the world and examines the relevance of ATD models for transit and destination countries,

Page 1 of 47 | Total Record : 466