cover
Contact Name
Tony Hadibarata
Contact Email
hadibarata@gmail.com
Phone
+6282153870439
Journal Mail Official
idwm@tecnoscientifica.com
Editorial Address
Editorial Office - Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Jalan Asem Baris Raya No 116 Kebon Baru, Tebet, Jakarta Selatan Jakarta 12830, Indonesia
Location
Kota adm. jakarta selatan,
Dki jakarta
INDONESIA
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management
Published by Tecno Scientifica
ISSN : -     EISSN : 28094255     DOI : https://doi.org/10.53623/idwm.v2i1
Core Subject : Social, Engineering,
The journal is intended to provide a platform for research communities from different disciplines to disseminate, exchange and communicate all aspects of industrial and domestic waste management. The topics of this journal include, but are not limited to: Address waste management policy, education, and economic and environmental assessments Pollution prevention, clean technologies, conservation/recycling/reuse Multicriteria assessment of waste treatment technologies Stakeholder role: technology implementation, future technology management strategies Participatory decision making, integration of policies/research in the waste sector Case studies and environmental impact analysis in the waste sector Air, water, soil, groundwater, radiological pollution, control/management Environmental pollution, prevention/control, waste treatment/management Water and municipal/agricultural/industrial wastewater and waste treatment Solid/hazardous/biosolids/residuals waste, treatment/minimization/disposal/management Environmental quality standards, legislation, regulations, policy Public/environmental health, environmental toxicology, risk assessment Sources/transport/fate of pollutants in the environment; remediation, restoration Mathematical/modelling techniques, case studies
Articles 23 Documents
Green Building Practices on Waste Minimization in China Construction Industry Bernice Xin Yi Lee; Mohanadoss Ponraj; Hasti Widyasamratri; Jie Wang
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2021)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (534.5 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v1i1.36

Abstract

In China, a common practice for construction waste management is to dispose of it in landfills. A 5% construction waste recycling rate and ongoing insufficient landfilling practice resulted in decreased environmental and socioeconomic well-being. Management hierarchy that starts with rethink, redesign, reduce, reuse, refurbish, recycle, incineration, and finally disposal is a probable strategy to facilitate construction waste minimization in China. The green building concept pursued by China also served as a promising tool in evaluating the performance of Chinese green buildings. Barriers include lack of standard operating procedure in waste minimization, immature recycling technology and an undeveloped recycling market, leading to poor performance in construction waste minimization. Several strategies are proposed to ameliorate the current condition in China's construction sector. Even though results reveal that China falls behind in the engagement of green building compared to developed countries, green materials are utilized in various building structures such as flooring, roofs, walls, and outdoor pavements. Lastly, the benefits and shortcomings of two green material technologies, in particular material selection and recycling, applied in China were reviewed. 
Utilization of Moringa oleifera as Natural Coagulant for Water Purification Meng Hong Ng; Mohamed Soliman Elshikh
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2021)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (323.296 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v1i1.41

Abstract

The plant-based natural coagulant has the potential to substitute the chemical coagulant in the water treatment process. In this work, the potential of plant-based natural coagulants in the ability of turbidity removal was identified. The Moringa oleifera seed was selected for the batch analysis test such as pH, contact time, agitation, and dosage. The high alkaline water decreases the effectiveness of plant-based natural coagulants. The agitation and contact time show the importance of the coagulation process. The optimum turbidity removal rate in pH is 4, the contact time is 60 seconds and 3000 seconds for coagulation and flocculation, respectively, the agitation is 300 RPM and 30 RPM for coagulation and flocculation, and lastly, the dosage is 10 g of Moringa oleifera seed. Finally, the plant-based natural coagulants demonstrated the ability to remove turbidity and could be used in place of chemical coagulants.
Sustainable Technology in Developed Countries: Waste Municipal Management Carol Emilly Hoareau; Noraziah Ahmad; Maria Nuid; Rubiyatno; Dao Nguyen Khoi; Risky Ayu Kristanti
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2021)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (311.878 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v1i1.49

Abstract

As more studies were conducted and global events unfold, a greater emphasis is being placed on the importance of preserving the Earth's natural resources and cycles before we face a catastrophic climate crisis. Thus, developed countries are constantly adapting their policies and legislation to promote green development for the sake of sustainable development, which benefits both the environment and the socioeconomic segment. As populations grow and living standards improve, more waste is generated. Appropriate municipal waste management is necessary to avoid harm to the environment, wildlife, and human health. Sustainable municipal solid waste management is even included in the United Nations' (UN) Sustainable Development Goals, which aim to improve the world's environment and economy. The European Union (EU) member states' waste management systems can be considered exemplary. In some countries, landfills have been prohibited, promoting the use of more sustainable technologies such as organic waste incineration, recycling, and composting. However, a divide exists between member countries, with some lagging behind in terms of waste management strategies. Thus, this paper examined the current state of municipal waste in EU member states, followed by a review of the various disposal technologies implemented. The difficulties and environmental concerns that must be overcome are discussed, as are the recommendations and possible future directions.
Scenario of Municipal Waste Management in Malaysia Zachary Raphael Liew; Minhaj Uddin Monir; Risky Ayu Kristanti
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2021)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (195.836 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v1i1.50

Abstract

Malaysia has rapidly modernized, with most of the population now residing in cities and the remainder in rural or remote areas. The amount of municipal solid waste generated has increased in tandem with the country's rapid urbanization in response to that statement. Due to a lack of connectivity in rural areas, there may be insufficient infrastructure for a proper waste management system. As a result, illegal waste dumping was common, and landfills' massive volumes of waste may contribute to greenhouse gas emissions. The Malaysian government has responded by taking the necessary steps to upgrade the country's current waste management system in order to better manage municipal solid waste disposal. This research looks at how energy recovery from accumulated waste can be used as a renewable energy source, as well as the current issues, challenges, and proposed solutions. Methane gas produced as a byproduct of waste decomposition in landfills or disposal sites was used to generate electricity more efficiently and sustainably, resulting in a positive economic and environmental outcome.
Malaysia Moving Towards a Sustainability Municipal Waste Management Yien Yu Tang; Kuok Ho Daniel Tang; Amit Kumar Maharjan; Azrina Abdul Aziz; Seng Bunrith
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2021)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (490.167 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v1i1.51

Abstract

The elevation of waste generation subsequent to population growth has become a severe environmental topic in Malaysia. Since most of the waste is being dumped into a landfill, the open dumpsite, or unsanitary landfills which are not constructed with proper engineering plan, severe impacts on the environment result. The energy demand in Malaysia increased with the growing population, but reliance on fossil fuels to generate electricity has created another greenhouse gas contributor. Alternatively, waste-to-energy technology solves the problem of increasing waste by converting the waste to a renewable energy source. Malaysia has moved towards landfill gas recovery system and incineration for waste energy recovery. The recovery system and refuse-derived fuel plant achieved expectation; however, the incineration plants have failed due to the opposition of the public, lack of funding and technician expertise, and other technical issues. The solid waste management practices lacking separation and recycling sources, become an obstacle for development. The government puts effort into solving the current issue by promoting recycling in the public, enforcing the legislation, and approaching new technologies for better solid waste management practice in the future. This paper aims to discuss the application of energy recovery from municipal solid waste in Malaysia.
Tolerance of earthworms in soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon Rubiyatno; Zee Chuang Teh; Diah Velentina Lestari; Arma Yulisa; Muthah Musa; Tse-Wei Chen; Noura M. Darwish; Bandar M. AlMunqedhi; Tony Hadibarata
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2022)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (209.608 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v2i1.62

Abstract

Pyrene is a very resistant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with four benzene rings that survives in the environment. This study was aimed at investigating the tolerance of earthworms in soil contaminated with pyrene. The studies were performed by employing earthworms gathered from shady regions adjacent to sewage ponds as pyrene degraders to eradicate pyrene from the soil. Numerous factors affecting pyrene degradation efficiency were explored, including the effects of contaminant concentration, earthworm and soil ration, and soil condition. The highest pyrene removal (31.2%) was shown by earthworms in the condition of soil mixed with cow dung. Pyrene decomposition was inhibited during soil sterilization due to the absence of soil microorganisms and indigenous pyrene-degrading bacteria. Nonetheless, earthworms are suitable for use as pyrene degraders in contaminated soil.
Removal of Cresol Red by Adsorption Using Wastepaper Mohamad Salman; Muslum Demir; Kuok Ho Daniel Tang; Linh Thi Thuy Cao; Seng Bunrith; Tse-Wei Chen; Noura M. Darwish; Bandar M. AlMunqedhi; Tony Hadibarata
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2022)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (459.596 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v2i1.63

Abstract

The utilization of less expensive and more effective adsorbents derived from a variety of basic materials has been investigated. The research aimed to investigate the feasibility of employing waste paper as the adsorbent to remove the cresol red (CR) dye from wastewater through adsorption mechanism. Langmuir, Jovanovic, and Freundlich model were observed for isotherms models, while pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order were examined for kinetic models. The results indicated that increasing the adsorbent dose and contact time gave no significant effect to adsorption capacity while adsorption capacity increased with the increasing of pH until it reached a maximum at pH 8, and raising the starting dye concentration leads in a significant increase in adsorption capacity (16.7 mg/g). When the experimental adsorption isotherms and kinetic were fitted using the Freundlich models and pseudo-second-order model, it was discovered that those models were more accurately represented by the data, as indicated by a high correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.974 and 0.963.
Study of Household Waste Management and Recycling Awareness Between Residential Areas in Kuala Nerang, Kedah, Malaysia Husna Abdul Halim; Mohamed Zuhaili Mohamed Najib; Muzaffar Zainal Abideen; Hazlami Fikri Basri; Khalida Muda
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2022)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (268.618 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v2i1.70

Abstract

This paper presents a study on household waste management and recycling awareness. Residential areas are the major sources of solid waste as that is where people live. The waste that is usually disposed of from residential areas includes food waste, plastic waste, paper, glass, tin, and others. The increasing trend in waste generated from homes has become a major concern. This study aimed to assess household waste management and recycling awareness in two residential areas located in Padang Terap District, Kuala Nerang, Kedah, Malaysia. Recently, Padang Terap district showed an increase in waste generated compared to another district, Kedah. An open-ended questionnaire was distributed to approximately 32 respondents, and an interview was conducted to study household waste management and recycling awareness in two residential areas—Taman Jati and Taman Pelangi. The research shows that household waste management to segregate the waste remains a problem, despite most respondents being aware of this issue through different media. Furthermore, the lack of household waste management and recycling programs and facilities by the local authorities caused residents to be reluctant to practice these activities.
Effect of Substrate-to-Inoculum Ratio and Temperatures During the Start-up of Anaerobic Digestion of Fish Waste Arma Yulisa; Chayanee Chairattanawat; Sang Hyeok Park; Md Abu Hanifa Jannat; Seokhwan Hwang
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2022)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (724.104 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v2i1.80

Abstract

The high protein and lipid content of fish waste makes mono-digestion a difficult bioprocess for an anaerobic digestion (AD) system. On the other hand, the massive increase in fish and seafood consumption worldwide has led to an inevitable fish waste mono-AD. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of food-to-microorganisms (F/M) ratios and temperatures during the start-up period of fish waste mono-digestion. F/M ratios of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 on a g-COD/g-VSS basis were operated at 35°C and 45°C, representing mesophilic and hyper-mesophilic conditions, respectively. The increase in F/M ratio improved the maximum methane (CH4) production rate at both temperatures. However, F/M ratio of 0.5 generated the highest CH4 yield in mesophilic and hyper-mesophilic conditions (0.23±0.00 L-CH4/g-CODinput). Further increase in F/M ratio decreased CH4 yield up to 21.74% and 39.13% when the reactors were operated at 35°C and 45°C, respectively. When reactors were supplied with FM ratios of 0.5, 1, and 2, hyper-mesophilic temperature improved methanogenesis by up to 2.61% and shortened the lag phase by 22.88%. Meanwhile, F/M ratio 3 at 45°C decreased cumulative CH4 production by up to 26.57% and prolonged the lag phase by 10.19%. The result of this study is beneficial to managing the input substrate of a batch-AD system that treats fish waste as a sole substrate.
Adsorption of Phosphorus Using Cockle Shell Waste Natasya Binti Mohd Zain; Nurul Jannah Md Salleh; Nurul Fatihah Hisamuddin; Shazana Hashim; Noorul Hudai Abdullah
Industrial and Domestic Waste Management Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2022)
Publisher : Tecno Scientifica Publishing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (813.323 KB) | DOI: 10.53623/idwm.v2i1.81

Abstract

Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for aquatic plants and animals. The acceptable range for phosphorus in water is from 0.01 to 0.03 mg/L. However, excessive phosphorus use can result in biodiversity loss and pollution and endanger aquatic creatures and human health because the pollutants are non-biodegradable and thus accumulate over time. This work investigated the removal of phosphorus from synthetic wastewater containing KH2PO4 via adsorption using calcined cockle shell waste. Phosphorus adsorption by calcined cockle shell waste of less than 75 μm particle size was investigated. Five different adsorbent dosages (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 g) mixed with 10 ppm phosphate were adsorbed for 60 min. The presence of calcined cockle shell waste was determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and a DR6000 UV–visible spectrophotometer. In brief, the highest dosage of 1.0 g removed 94.96% phosphorus from the synthetic wastewater, while the longest treatment time resulted in 95.74% phosphorus adsorption. The proposed method is low-cost and convenient.

Page 1 of 3 | Total Record : 23