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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Geography
ISSN : 00249521     EISSN : 23549114     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Indonesian Journal of Geography ISSN 2354-9114 (online), ISSN 0024-9521 (print) is an international journal of Geography published by the Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada in collaboration with The Indonesian Geographers Association. Our scope of publications includes physical geography, human geography, regional planning and development, cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information system. IJG publishes its issues three times a year in April, August, and December.
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Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography" : 6 Documents clear
Biocultural Diversity: An Aemerging Concept in The 21 Century Anupriya Chatterjee
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2240

Abstract

The emerging concern in the last few decades for conserving 'diversity' is an impetus to conserve not only the whole spectmm of biota i.e. the total sum ofgenes, species and ecosystems but also indigenous culture, traditions, spiritual beliefs and values. This phenomenon is named Biocultural Diversity, which is a synthesis of both Biological Diversity (biodiversity) and Cultural Diversity. 1980 's was considered the decade of biodiversity, 1990's that of cultural diversity and 2000's a new field of Bio-Cultural diversity. In the first half of this paper the. interrelationship and interdependence between biodiversity and cultural diversity is discussed and in the second half how the modern global economic system is engulfing this diversity of life, knowledge, cultural heritage and practices areanalysed The global distribution and patterns of biodiversity coincide with that of cultural diversity, therefore if languages and cultures disappear due to global pressure of homogenization we also lose knowledge about our environment leadingto biodiversity depletion~ It is quite noticeable that the countries with peoplespeaking largest number of languages; and countries with greatest number of traditional livelihoods and indigenous communities obviously have the greatest biological diversity. Thus only a sustainable approach can bridge the gap between modern visions of human beings and traditional cultural aspirations thereby ensuring holistic development.
Misconception Of Run-Up Definition And Its Implication To Tsunami Risk Assessment A Case Study In Pacitan Coastal Area, Indonesia Djati Mardiatno; Suanrto Sunarto; Lies Rahayu W.F; Johann Stotter
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2241

Abstract

This article aims to build the similar understanding of run-up concept and to review the "map of t,'}iinami risk analysis in Pacitan" released by Balai Pengkajian Dinamika Pantai (BPDP)-BPPT Indonesia. We also propose similar understanding of risk definition related to the natural hazards, such as tsunami. The investigation used comparison method between 2 maps, i.e. tsunami risk map by BPDP and our tsunami risk map. Based on the comparison result, we found a misconception of rim-up in the tsunami risk map produced by BPDP. There is no differentiation between run-up and water-height over the land. It should be revised to avoid it from the incorrect rim-up definition. We also found if it was also mentioned as a "map of t.\imami risk analysis" while the analysis result was not performed in that map. Therefore, it is necessGlY to understand the run-up concept and risk concept first prior to map those phenomena.
The Use Of Remote Sensing For Mangrove Ecosystem.Monitoring In Segara Anakan Central Ja Va Hartono Hartono
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2242

Abstract

The paper deals with an actual condition of mangrove ecosystem in Segara Anakan Central Java by analysing them from remote sensing satellite image such as SPOT XS and Landsat 1M recorded in between 1981 and 2003. Digital and manual image analysis were applied Field checks were conducted in 199 3 and in 2005.The result show that three aspects of mangrove ecosystem can be studied from the remote sensing data, i.e. mangrove zonation, land cover changes and mangrove physical ecosystem changes. In mangrove zonation, it showed that three to four zones in mangrove forest zonation can be identified by satellite digital data analysis, especially in accretion areas. Mangrove of these areas actually suffers from human pressures, mainly for fishery and agriculture activities, and environmental changes. Lagoon morphometric decreased considerably and its influenced the existence of the mangroves. Mangrove extend in Segara Anakan, the mangrove forest covers 8600ha in 1987 and 7500ha in 1998, and in 2008 it decreased considerably. The lagoon of Segara Anakan undergoes to be disappeared by sedimentation processes from its hinterland In consequence mangrove ecosystem in the region is in dangerous condition
Land Conservation Initiatives Around MT. Elgon National Park, Eastern Uganda Mukadasi Buyinza
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2243

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to provide an investigation of the land conservation strategies adopted by farmers to control land degradation around Mt. Elgon National Park, Uganda. Primary data were obtained through household survey conducted in Mutushet and Kortek parishes, Kapc.horwa district between June to December, 2003. The differences between adopters and non-adopters of land conservation practices in terms of contact with extension workers, tribe, size of productive family labour, membership to farmer organization, education level, and participation in communal land management activities and frequency ofnatural hazards on private agricultural landfj were examined Farmers have increasingly adopted different structural measures like terraced farming, construction of waterways, check dams, retention walls, and gull control. Similarly, they have also adopted different biological measures including alley cropping, bamboo plantation in gullies, mulching and applied organic and inorganicfertilizers to control land degradation. However, farmers have not been able to control land degradation to a great extent due to relatively weak technological backup by concerned agencies. It was concluded that severity of land degradation is higher in the parishes with traditional farming methods because farmers are not provided with the necessary technical advisory services.
Micro-Environmental status of a dissected highland (College Tilla) of Agartala city, North East india Sudip Dey
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2244

Abstract

This paper assesses the present micro-environmental conditions of a dissected highland", College Tilla of Agartala city of North-East India. Geomorphologically Agartala city is located in a part of the basin of R Haora which consists of two main geomorphic units namely dissected high lands or tilla lands and adjacent flat alluvium lands. The elevated geomorphology of the tillalands play important role for the development and preservation of typical high landenvironment and rich ecological resources in some pockets of flat alluvium of R Haora basin for long time. Since the urban activities started on College Tilla only during early 2dh century the variation of flora and fauna of the tilla land is still.remarkable. During the recent period rapid extension of Agartala city causes theproblem of geomorphic degradation and affects the natural environmentalcondition of the area. Due to the construction of the buildings, roads, boundaries, water pipe lines etc the dense vegetation cover is removed rapidly and as a result of that now soil erosion and medium size land slides are becoming very commonfeatures in the city. Besides that the ecology of this area is now under serious degradation due to desperate human interventions on the tilla lands of Agartala City
Application Of Water Table Fluctuation Method To Quantify Spatial Groundwater Recharge Witidn The Southern Slope Of Merapi Volcano, Indonesia Tjahyo Nugroho Adji
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 39, No 2 (2007): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2245

Abstract

The southern slope of Merapi Volcano plays a significant role to Yogyakarta Municipality groundwater resources. Groundwater recharge, herein meant as the effective precipitation that infiltrates into unsaturated zone andpercolates to water table after exceeds the soi/field capacity, is the main subject in this article. The objective of this research is to apply WTF method to spatially define the groundwater annual recharge. Four wells are selected to represent some geomorphologic units. Then, four A WLR installed to record the yearly shallow groundwater table fluctuation. In addition, WTF method requires groundwaterfluctuation and specific yield data. The rate of groundwater recharge in every well confirms the varying value. However, it seems that geomorphologic unit may be principally control to the time series variation of shallow groundwater jluctuationthat results in groundwater recharge characteristic. The volcanic slope unit (above 600 m as!) has the lowest water table fluctuation indicates the resistant comportment to the annual rainfall. Ihis unit is characterized by the relatively high magnitude of recharge of approximately 4270 mm/year.

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