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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Geography
ISSN : 00249521     EISSN : 23549114     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Indonesian Journal of Geography ISSN 2354-9114 (online), ISSN 0024-9521 (print) is an international journal of Geography published by the Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada in collaboration with The Indonesian Geographers Association. Our scope of publications includes physical geography, human geography, regional planning and development, cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information system. IJG publishes its issues three times a year in April, August, and December.
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Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography" : 7 Documents clear
THE ROLE OF VEGETATION COVER AND CATCHMENT CHARACTERISTICS ON BASEFLOW IN BALI ISLAND Saparis Soedarjanto; J. Sartohadi; M.P. Hadi; P. Danoedoro
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2379

Abstract

Studies of the role of combined vegetation cover and catchment characteristics on base flowcondition are required to address the controversy of correlation between vegetation andhydrological properties. Objectives of the research were: 1) to assess the hydrological role ofvegetation on baseflow condition; and 2) to study the influence of vegetation cover in relationto catchment characteristics on the baseflow. Field survey, digital filter method, remotesensing technique, and statistical analysis were used to derive and assess the correlationamong variables. Results of the research were: 1) a negative significant correlation betweenvegetation cover and baseflow recession coefficient, despite the fact that it is not a singlefactor and related to various catchment characteristics; 2) vegetation cover is not a singlefactor in determining the baseflow characteristics, since it also involves drainage density andinfiltration rate.
DISASTER AND RESILIENCE FOR THE 2007 FLOOD EVENT IN PART OF SUKOHARJO REGENCY Sinta Damayanti; Muh Aris Marfai
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2380

Abstract

Community resilience has become an important factor in a disaster mitigation plan.Resilience is related to the ability to recover from a disaster and is for every persondifferent. This research intends to assess community resilience for flood disaster. Factorsfor quantifying community resilience were asked to respondents by giving questionnaireand interviewing them, and FGD was also done in order to generate flood map based onthe community knowledge. The FGD result shows that the flood depth in the study areavaries from 0 until 300 cm, and the duration of inundation varies from 1-7 days. Floodalso caused losses, and the distribution of the losses was Rp. 0 - 100,000,000,- although, ingeneral, the losses was merely below Rp. 2,000,000,-. Based on the weighting result, theresilience value of the respondent is distributed from 0.113 until 0.700. The averageresilience value of Laban village is 0.403, and 0.368 for Kadokan village. The resiliencevalue was mostly influenced by human capital. In order to increase the communityresilience, government has established flood control devices and rehabilitated the dike alongthe river.
IMPACTS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT PRESSURE ON COASTAL LOCAL COMMUNITIES IN TANZANIA Susan Rugano Gwalema
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2381

Abstract

The study examined the socio-economic and cultural impacts of urban development pressureon coastal local communities in Tanzania, in line with the implementation of Human Rightsand the National Land and Human Settlement Development Policy, and suggests measures tomanage or prevent the adverse impacts and enhance beneficial impacts. Social ImpactAssessment principles were employed to study the impacts of urban development pressure onKaole, Ununio and Kilwa-Masoko. Qualitative data from 12 informants, 6 Focus Groups,and quantitative data from 150 heads of household and their spouses were collected using asemi-structured questionnaire. Data was analysed using the SPSS computer software. It wasfound out that impacts included low incomes, insecurity over land, food insecurity, pooraccess to social services, and vulnerability to poverty. Apart from Kilwa-Masoko, there wereno programmes to avoid negative impacts of urban development. It is recommended that landallocation processes should properly implement Human Rights and the National Land andHuman Settlement Development Policy.
ENVIRONMENTAL CARRYING CAPACITY BASED ON SPATIAL PLANNING Luthfi Muta'ali
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2382

Abstract

The aims of this research were to examine environmental carrying capacity analyzed basedon aspects of spatial planning and eco-region. The result showed that Kulonprogo Regencyhas low value of environmental carrying capacity and can only support as much as 79.81%of its total population. Analysis of variance showed significant difference of environmentalcarrying capacity of protected and cultivated area. The main factor among 12 variablesdetermining the degree of environmental carrying capacity is man-land ratio (contributed39.72%). Priority should be given to 28 villages or 31.81% of the area with lowenvironmental carrying capacity. Eco-region and spatial plan approaches in environmentalmanagement practice are also strongly recommended.
EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSBOUNDARY COLLABORATIVE CONSERVATION IN VIRUNGA NATIONAL PARKS Nabalegwa M Wambede; Buyinza Mukadasi; Tiyo Christopher
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2383

Abstract

The general aim was to assess the effectiveness of transboundary collaboration in thecontiguously adjoining protected areas of Virunga massive. The specific objectives were, a)to identify the role of different stakeholders in the management of transboundarycollaboration, b) to assess the level of collaboration between the three authorities andgovernments, c) to assess the participation of local communities in planning andmanagement of the natural resources, and d) to establish the effectiveness of the approach inmanaging natural resources. The study employed both the primary and the secondary datasources. The questionnaires were used to collect data from officers and the discussion withrelevant officials was conducted. A total 90 local community members were interviewed fromthe three countries. The secondary data were collected from management of MgahingaNational Park, Parc Nationaux des Volcano of Rwanda, Parc National des Virunga IGCPstaff and crossection of protected areas stakeholders and government institutions of the threecountries. The Results indicated that regarding the collaborative management between thethree authorities, it was found out that information exchange and joint patrol were the majoractivities. By 2003, in Uganda poaching had reduced to 1 case and the wire snare to 54which accounted for 2.3% and 8.8% respectively from the 23.3% and 19.6% in 1997.However the figures in Rwanda reduce slightly due to the security situation. It was alsodiscovered that the local communities of DR. Congo and Rwanda were highly involved inplanning of conservation activities that the case with Uganda.
ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY BASED SHALLOW CRUSTAL DEFORMATION ANALYSIS IN AN ACTIVE SEISMIC ZONE Gunjan Mukherjee; Chandrani Debbarma; Sushmita Paul; Sudip Dey
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2384

Abstract

This paper aims to assess the shallow crustal deformation in a highly seismic-prone zone ofnortheast India. For that purpose, Tripura University campus has been selected which isnearly 8 km away from Agartala city. The field work was conducted by using electricalresistivity meter. Vertical Electrical Sounding or VES method of resistivity survey wasadopted for measuring the electrical resistivity and structural analysis of the study area.Total four VES points were recorded namely near the Department of Physics, Department ofGeography and Disaster Management, Teachers’ Residential area and Girls’ Hostel. Therecorded data was measured and two different electrical profiles were drawn i.e. (a) Physicsbuilding to Geography buildings and (b) teachers’ quarters to Girls’ Hostel. From theelectrical resistivity profiles, a clear break in resistivity characters has been observed in thewestern part which is located near the Tripura University Girls’ Hostel. This clearly provesthat a deformation occurred in this area below 4 m depth and it can be very dangerous if ahigh magnitude seismic slip takes place. From this observation, this hostel is detected as themost risk prone building. Apart from that, the teachers’ quarters near the Girls’ hostel havealso been detected as equally risk prone. From this point of view it can be recommended thatconstruction of heavy buildings should be restricted in Tripura University campus as thesubsurface deformation zone can create faulting during high magnitude earthquake.
CONCEPTUALIZATION OF URBANIZATION STRUCTURE AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN LAGOS, NIGERIA Adejobi Oladepo Samson; Olorunnimbe Rafiu O
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 43, No 2 (2011): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.2385

Abstract

Urbanization is synonymous with environmental challenges. In developing countries, thechallenges have assumed higher dimensions proportionally due to multifarious issues of rapidchanges in the environment, due to development, through population growth andindustrialization, and accompanied by all kinds of pollution such as air pollution, wastedisposal, land use degradation, and vehicular pollution as the resultant effects of man’sinteraction with the environment. The main characteristic effect is the raised temperature of thecity centre (UHI) leading to excessive energy use for cooling and putting urban population atgreat morbidity and mortality risks. This paper literally explores the conceptual framework ofinteraction between urbanization structure and understanding social impacts of climate changeand variability for the evaluation of strategies in the urbanized environment that might serve asadaptive response to climate change. The urbanization structure that affects Lagos state isdiscussed in relation to the location of the city, the size, the population density, urbangeometry, thermal property, air pollution, land use pattern, wind speed and anthropogenicactivities. The study revealed that climate change is posing increasing challenges for citiesplacing greater stress and impacts on multiple social and biophysical systems, including urbaninfrastructure, water and energy demand simultaneously, followed by a strong global trendtowards urbanization of urban poverty. The study concluded that climate change has impactedgreatly on virtually all the socio-economic aspects of man.

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