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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Geography
ISSN : 00249521     EISSN : 23549114     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Indonesian Journal of Geography ISSN 2354-9114 (online), ISSN 0024-9521 (print) is an international journal of Geography published by the Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada in collaboration with The Indonesian Geographers Association. Our scope of publications includes physical geography, human geography, regional planning and development, cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information system. IJG publishes its issues three times a year in April, August, and December.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography" : 16 Documents clear
Spectral Characteristics of Plastic Debris in the Beach: Case Study of Makassar Coastal Area Ahmad Faizal; Shinta Werorilangi; Wasir Samad
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (95.158 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.40519

Abstract

Plastic debris becomes a global problem that threatens the coastal ecosystems, and the supralittoral area (beach) turns to be a place for plastic debris to accumulate. Data from the United Nations (UN) states that Indonesia is the second plastic debris contributor in world waters. This study aimed to examine the spectral characteristics of plastic debris accumulated on the beach. The data was collected from the coast of Makassar at 3 different stations: Jenneberang  River estuary, Losari  Beach and Tallo River estuary. The spectral sample was measured using a 4000 A spectroradiometer that works on a wavelength spectrum of 340 - 1040 nm. The results showed that the optimum value for plastic debris identification in the coastal area at low tide (dry sand) is 450-670 nm and at high tide (wet sand) is 450-950 nm.  This value will be a reference in the remote sensing method, especially multispectral classification in mapping plastic debris found in coastal areas, and will be one solution to effectively mapping plastic debris.
Urban Forced Eviction: Experiences in the Metropolitan City of Lagos, Nigeria Ayobami Abayomi Popoola; Michael Olaitan Olatunde; Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha; Abiodun Amuda; Bamiji Michael Adeleye; Lovemore Chipungu
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (50.688 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.40555

Abstract

Urban poverty coupled with housing shortages have contributed to the proliferation of informal settlements and slums. This is one of the complex problems arising out of urbanization and which is piling pressure on urban authorities to use unorthodox methods (such as forced evictions) to ameliorate the situation. This paper revisits the use of forced migration in Badia East Community of Lagos city. Using the human security concept as a framework for analysis, the paper chronicles how urban forced migration is used as a tool to relocate the vulnerable urban poor by urban authorities in their bid to achieve sustainable development. Critical insight into the nature of these migrations was achieved by gathering data using the mixed approach. Finding from the study revealed rampant human abuse through the use of force during the eviction process. The paper concludes by recommending that the government should use best practices, (such as adequate government-assistance) during relocations and rehousing option explored. 
Characterizing River Baseflow Recession Using Linear Reservoir Model in Alang Watershed, Central Java, Indonesia Bokiraiya Okky Latuamury; Lydia Riekie Parera; Husein Marasabessy
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (720.062 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.43565

Abstract

Alang is a sub-watershed emptying into the Gajah Mungkur Reservoir in Wonogiri, Central Java Indonesia, with an area of 51.01 km2 and lithology composed of Baturetno Formation and Wonosari Formation. Baseflow is a major component of river flow during the dry season. Hence, the characterization of its recession becomes necessary, and it can be performed with innovation in baseflow hydrological modeling, that is, the recession curve. This study was designed to describe the distinctive features of baseflow recession using a linear reservoir model, which is depicted in individual and master recession curves. The baseflow recession in AlangSubwatershed was represented by a combination of varying initial recession discharge (Q0), α, and recession constants (Krb). The individual recession curves were typified by Q0=0.19-9.11, α= 0.089-0.243, and Krb=0.7843-0.9148. As for the master recession curve, it had Q0=9.99, α=0.085, and Krb=0.928. These results signify a sloping recession curve, meaning that the water storage and aquifer characteristics that store and transmit water in Alang Subwatershed are in good condition.
Potential of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Mapping of Soft Clay Area in Paddy Fields of Kedah, Malaysia Muhammad Rendana; Wan Mohd Razi Idris; Sahibin Abdul Rahim; Zulfahmi Ali Rahman; Tukimat Lihan
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (889.723 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.43617

Abstract

Mapping of soft clay area in paddy fields uses remote sensing and GIS technique is the fastest way to obtain an accurate location of soft clay in a large scale area. It can be an alternative way to change conventional method like in-situ observation that is expensive and labor intensive. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to map soft clay area in paddy fields Kedah, Malaysia. To analyze soft clay area comprehensively, the study was carried out in three different periods; before paddy planting, after paddy planting and harvest. Ground-truth data of soft clay area was collected from study area during fieldwork activity and compared with NDVI values that produced from Landsat 8 image. Result of study showed NDVI map in period of before paddy planting could be a good indicator for mapping soft clay area because it gave a higher accuracy value than the other periods, with overall accuracy (85%) and kappa coefficient (0,84). Total area of soft clay from the highest value was showed in period of before paddy planting (1.856,97 ha), followed by after paddy planting (656,73 ha) and harvest (401,85 ha) periods, respectively.
Detection of Potential Fishing Zones of Bigeye Tuna (Thunnus Obesus) at Profundity of 155 m in the Eastern Indian Ocean Achmad Fachruddin-Syah; Jonson Lumban Gaol; Mukti Zainuddin; Nadela Rista Apriliya; Dessy Berlianty; Dendy Mahabror
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (593.972 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.43708

Abstract

Remotely sensed data and habitat model approach were employed to evaluate the present of oceanographic aspect in the Bigeye tuna's potential fishing zone (PFZ) at a profundity of 155 m. Vessel monitoring system was employed to acquire the angling vessels for Bigeye tuna from January through December, 2015-2016. Daily data of sub-surface temperature (Sub_ST), sub-surface chlorophyll-a (Sub_SC), and sub-surface salinity (Sub_SS) were downloaded from INDESO Project website. Vessel monitoring system and environmental data were employed for maximum entropy (maxent) model development. The model predictive achievement was then estimated applying the area under the curve (AUC) value. Maxent model results (AUC>0.745) exhibited its probable to understand the Bigeye tuna's spatial dispersion on the specific sub-surface. In addition, the results also showed Sub_ST (43,1%) was the most affective aspect in the Bigeye tuna dispersion, pursued by Sub_SC (35,2%) and Sub_SS (21,6%).
Bandwidth Modelling on Geographically Weighted Regression with Bisquare Adaptive Method using Kriging Interpolation for Land Price Estimation Model Alfita Puspa Handayani; Albertus Deliar; Irawan Sumarto; Ibnu Syabri
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (237.189 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.43724

Abstract

Land prices, especially in an urban area, are dynamically changing.  To be able to do an evaluation, the right models must have the ability to understand land price characteristics that also dynamically changing. Every land price must attach to a location (spatial based). One of the locations (spatial based) models is Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR). This model can provide a local model based on the concept of attachment between observation and regression points. The main component is the determination of Optimum Bandwidth, which will determine the accuracy of the final GWR model. In the bandwidth process, it is necessary to do trial and error to get the Optimum Bandwidth value. Cross-Validation method commonly used to determine optimum bandwidth on observation point, but this study aims to minimize the process of trial and error in determining optimal bandwidth outside the observation point by using kriging interpolation. The Kriging method can substantially provide better bandwidth usage without having to do a trial process with too many errors. 
The Reconstruction of a Javanese Civilization Cultural Landscape in 8 AD based on Canggal Inscription in Gendol Hill Complex, Magelang, Central Java Niken Wirasanti; Helmi Murwanto
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.447 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.44294

Abstract

The research took place in the Gendol Hill complex, Magelang, Central Java. One of the peaks in the hills complex is Mount Wukir, where a Canggal Inscription was found. The Canggal Inscription mentions an area named Java, rich in agricultural products with many sacred buildings. The term Javanese refers to an area of Gendol Hill complex, which is part of the Kedu–Central Java region. This paper aims to 1) interpret the cultural landscape of the Gendol Hill complex, 2) reconstruct the spatial structure (layout), and its utilization as a settlement area for Javanese society in the 8th century.  This paper interprets the Canggal Inscription and collates information about the potential of both biotic and non-biotic resources. Data processing is conducted through inductive–explanatory analysis. The results suggest that the Cultural Landscape of Gunung Wukir Temple was in a place protecting it from disaster. The complex was protected by Gendol Hills, acting as a barrier against volcanic eruptions from  Mount Merapi. Gendol Hill complex was located in an environment that flourished with both biotic and non-biotic resources. The community cultivated its alluvial plains and established settlements in this area. The denuded structural hills were also perceived as sacred spaces to erect temples with natural resources close by such as andesite rocks available from rivers around the hills.
Basement Characteristics of Jakarta Groundwater Basin Based on Satellite Gravimetry Data Gumilar Utamas Nugraha; Lina Handayani; Rachmat Fajar Lubis; Dadan Dani Wardhana; Karit Lumban Gaol
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (231.363 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.46672

Abstract

Jakarta groundwater basin is one of the most developed basins in Indonesia as Jakarta city is located within the basin, with an elevation ranging from 0 to 1000 m above sea level. The study of the basement characteristics of groundwater basins still needs further study in the Jakarta Groundwater Basin. The objective of this study is to examine the basement characteristics of Jakarta Groundwater Basin by satellite gravimetry. Gravity forward models were constructed using Oasis Montaj and 2-D GM-SYS software for two north-south sections, A and B, and west-east section C-D. Regional anomalies in the study area with a value range of 36.7 to 53.2 mGal, while the residual anomaly values in the study area were in the range of -7.0 - 10.0 mGal. There are four rock formations based on forwarding modeling. Holocene Beach Ridge Deposit formation has a density of 2.0 gr/cc. The thickness of this formation is estimated to be around 10-20 meters. Late Pleistocene Alluvial fan has a density of about 2.2 gr/cc. The depth of this layer ranges from 10-50 meters. Early Pleistocene Formation, has a density of 2.35 gr/cc. The thickness of this formation is at a depth of 50-200 meters in the cross-section. The Tertiary Marine Sediment Formation is a basement of the Jakarta Groundwater Basin. This formation has a rock density of 2.45 gr/cc. 
Rural Farm and Non-farm Linkages in a Predominantly Manufacturing Region: The Case of Semarang Regency, Indonesia Puji Hardati; Rijanta Rijanta; Su Ritohardoyo
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (20.823 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.47450

Abstract

This paper aimed to explore the correlation between the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors in the rural area affected by the manufacturing industry agglomeration of Semarang. Data on agricultural commodities, non-agricultural labor, and economic service facilities were reduced using factor analysis to form the typology of agricultural commodity areas and typology of rural diversification respectively. The two groups of score factors were correlated to predict the magnitude, direction, and significance of the inter-sectoral linkages. Data interpretation was made with the help of agricultural commodity flow data from the selected market. The study confirms the weak linkages between large-scale manufacturing industries and the agricultural economy in the hinterland. The study reflects weak linkages between the agricultural sector and rural diversification, as indicated by the weak correlation between factor scores. A rather strong linkage is shown by dryland agricultural areas associated with inland fisheries and rural diversification associated with tourism. 
Impact of Land-Use Change on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Tropical Peatland, West Kalimantan- Indonesia Rossie Wiedya Nusantara; Sudarmadji Sudarmadji; Tjut S. Djohan; Eko Haryono
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 1 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (286.551 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.48451

Abstract

The conversion of tropical peat forest to other land uses can reduce organic carbon (C) and stable C isotope (δ13C) of peat soil. This research aimed at analyzing the soil organic-C and δ13C of peatland with respect to maturity (fibric, hemic and sapric) in five types of peatland use, which included primary peat forest, secondary peat forest, shrubs, oil palm plantations, and cornfield in West Kalimantan. Analysis of peat soil samples includes organic C with Loss in ignition method and δ13C  using an isotope ratio mass spectrometry(IRMS) method. Organic-C at fibric was higher than hemic and sapric, respectively (57.2%, 57.0%, 56.4%), meanwhile, organic-C was the highest on primary peat forest, followed by on secondary peat forest, oil palm plantation, cornfield, and shrubs, respectively 57.1%, 57.0%, 56.4%, 56.0%. The cause of increasing and decreasing organic C and δ13C due to land-use change due to changes in vegetation, burning during tillage, and age of organic matter of peat soil. This condition causes the opening of natural peat ecosystems and changes in anaerobic to aerobic conditions. 

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