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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Geography
ISSN : 00249521     EISSN : 23549114     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Indonesian Journal of Geography ISSN 2354-9114 (online), ISSN 0024-9521 (print) is an international journal of Geography published by the Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada in collaboration with The Indonesian Geographers Association. Our scope of publications includes physical geography, human geography, regional planning and development, cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information system. IJG publishes its issues three times a year in April, August, and December.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography" : 16 Documents clear
Spatial Dynamics Model of Land Availability and Population Growth Prediction in Bengkulu City Della Ayu Lestari; Dewi Susiloningtyas; Supriatna Supriatna
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.44591

Abstract

Bengkulu City is the center for almost all activities and has a high population growth rate. Because of the high population growth rate, human needs for space and land will increase. Land availability will continue to decline, while it cannot increase the existing area. This will impact the carrying capacity of the environment, so it needs predictions for land availability. This study used a spatial dynamics model which is an analysis of the dynamic system model and the suitability of the built-up area. The carrying capacity to reach excellent quality when the length of the built-up area is 30-70% of the total area that can be used. The results showed that the built-up area will reach 70% in 2030, which means it will exceed the environmental carrying capacity threshold. The results showed there were differences between the distribution patterns of built-up area in the spatial dynamics model and Spatial Planning Bengkulu City in 2032 at Kampung Melayu Subdistrict, Selebar Subdistrict, Singaran Pati Subdistrict, and Sungai Serut Subdistrict.
Spatio-temporal analysis of land use/land cover dynamics in Sokoto Metropolis using multi-temporal satellite data and Land Change Modeller Murtala Dangulla; Latifah Abd Manaf; Firuz Ramli Mohammad
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.46615

Abstract

Urbanization is currently one of the most pressing environmental issues which cuts across all countries at unprecedented rates and intensities, with far reaching consequences on ecosystems, biodiversity and human wellbeing. This paper assessed urban expansion and land use/land cover changes in Sokoto metropolis, North-western Nigeria using Remote Sensing and GIS. Landsat images of 1990, 1999 and 2015 were processed for LULC classification and change detection using the Maximum Likelihood Classification, Post Classification Comparison techniques and the Land Change Modeler. The classification revealed five broad land cover classes which include Built-up Area, Farmland, Green Area, Open Space and Wetland/Water. The Built-up and Green areas continuously increased while Farmland and Open space decreased throughout the study period. The metropolis expanded radially at a faster rate between 1999 and 2015 with the highest rate of increase (1890.5ha per annum) recorded in the Built-up Area. This implies a doubling time of approximately 30 years at the expense of Farmland and Open space which may be completely exhausted in 40 and 29 years respectively. Infrastructural provision should thus align with the rate and direction of growth and where the Green Area is converted, replacement should be made to ensure continued supply and stability of the numerous ecosystem services green areas provide.
Wisdom of Indigenous and Tacit Knowledge for Disaster Risk Reduction Furqan Ishak Aksa
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.47321

Abstract

This article aims to identify the types of knowledge needed in reducing the risk of disasters and challenges in applying knowledge. Based on the literature review, this article analyzes various kinds of knowledge, the process of knowledge creation, and the challenges of knowledge transmission. Basically, knowledge consists of explicit and tacit knowledge. In the context of disasters, most of the knowledge is tacit in individual local people (indigenous knowledge). Tacit knowledge can motivate someone to make decisions (act) when a disaster occurs. To be understood and disseminated to the wider community, tacit knowledge needs to be converted into explicit knowledge and scientifically validated. This article proposes the importance of integrating tacit knowledge in the form of local knowledge to become explicit knowledge so it can be widely used. Knowledge built in a bottom-up manner, which comes from local knowledge, is believed to be effective in disaster risk reduction. However, in some countries, the process of applying the knowledge is constrained by a fatalism that is influenced by social culture and religious beliefs.
Testing a detailed classification scheme for land-cover/ land-use mapping of typical Indonesian landscapes: case study of Sarolangun, Jambi and Salatiga, Central Java Projo Danoedoro; Irvan Nurrahman Ananda; Candra Sari Djati Kartika; Assyria F Umela; Alvidita Beatrix Indayani
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.50080

Abstract

Land-cover/land-use (LCLU) mapping is an important activity to produce very useful information to support  various sectors, such as land supply, spatial planning, disaster mitigation, and agricultural development.  In Indonesia, a LCLU classification scheme has been developed at a scale of 1: 50,000, but it still requires an evaluation due to its advantages and limitations. This study tried to apply a classification scheme for LCLU-based on SNI 7645-1 2014 for two regions in Indonesia with different landscape characteristics, i.e.  Sarolangun in Jambi and Salatiga and surroundings in Central Java.. The trial was conducted by developing methods of Landsat-8 satellite image analysis and interpretation combining digital processing and manual delineation. Based on this research, a number of 52 LCLU classes were identified  in Sarolanguni and 32 classes were found in Salatiga and surrounding areas. The validation showed that the LCLU map of Jambi region reached 80.75.% of total accuracy, while that of Salatiga and surroundings reached 88.7%.  Different accuracies found related to the number of classes produced, the pattern of relationship between LCLU with the existing landform characteristics, and the quality of images due to cloud cover. 
Assessment of Gap-Filling Interpolation Methods for Identifying Mangrove Trends at Segara Anakan in 2015 by using Landsat 8 OLI and Proba-V Sanjiwana Arjasakusuma; Abimanyu Putra Pratama; Intan Lestari
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.50556

Abstract

The existence and services of mangrove ecosystems in Segara Anakan are threatened by changes in land use on land and global warming, which requires proper and intensive monitoring. The monitoring of mangrove and its trend over large areas can be done using multi-temporal remote sensing technology. However, remote sensing data is often contaminated by cloud cover, and its corresponding shadow resulted in missing data. This study aims to assess the performance of the existed gap-filling techniques, such as, linear, spline, stineman,  data interpolation Empirical Orthogonal Function (dineof) and spatial downscaling strategy employing the Proba-V imagery in 100 m, when being used for estimating the missing data and depicting the trend in NDVI from Landsat 8 OLI by using Mann-Kendall test. Our result suggested that EOF-based interpolation gave better prediction results and more accurate in predicting longer missing data. Linear interpolation, on the other hand, was accurate to predict shorter missing data. Overall, all interpolation results can reconstruct 64 (spline) to 72 % (dineof) of missing data in NDVI with the RMSE of 0.10 (dineof) – 0.13 (spline). A consistent decreasing trend was also found from the four interpolation methods, which showed the consistency of the interpolated values when used for deriving trends with similar patterns of overall decreasing trend and magnitude of changes of -0.0095 to -0.0099 (NDVI unit) over the mangrove areas in 2015. The result demonstrated the potential ability of gap-filling methods for simulating the value of missing data and for deriving trends.
Analysis of the population dynamics in the “Slavic World” with a special focus on Russia Nina N. Loginova; Milan M. Radovanović; Anatoliy A. Yamashkin; Goran Vasin; Marko D. Petrović; Dunja Demirović Bajrami
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.51202

Abstract

Population changes of the Russians and other Slavs are an important original indicator of demographic, economic, political, and cultural analysis of over 300 million Slavic inhabitants in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe. The indicators are conditioned by the large number of people executed in World War I and World War II, significant economic migrations, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia. Utilizing data from official reports, the authors proceed to analyze the demographic tendencies in order to find out the relationship between modern demographic trends and political and economic events over the past years. The results showed that economic and demographic stagnation, which favor religious and national (ethnic) ambivalence, influence the strengthening of groups ethnically isolated or religiously differentiated in the observed macroregions of Eurasia. The contemporary challenges of modern society in terms of global politics (e.g. terrorism and migrations) will be more pronounced and turbulent in these areas. For these reasons, the original data represent an important segment of the study of Slavic history, demography, and politics throughout the turbulent 20th century and the beginning of the new millennium.   
Topography changes and thermal distribution at the Kelud crater after the 2014 Plinian eruption Wahyudi Wahyudi; Ari Setiawan; Heriansyah Putra; Herlan Darmawan; Imam Suyanto; Irwan Meilano; Irzaman irzaman; Maria Evita; Mitra Djamal; Moh Yasin; Nina Siti Aminah; Perdinan Perdinan; Retna Apsari; Wahyu Srigutomo; Wiwit Suryanto
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.51986

Abstract

Topography of a volcano crater can change due to endogenic processes such as deformation or eruption, or surface processes. Erosion and deposition are surface processes that may occur and gradually change the slope of the inner volcano crater. Here, we investigated erosion and deposition processes that occurred in the Kelud crater after the 2014 plinian eruption. We used high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and orthomosaic images derived by drone photogrammetry that acquired between September 2018 and July 2019. We obtained hundreds of aerial images which were reconstructed to obtain 3D models of Kelud’s crater by using Structure from Motion (SfM) technique. Results show erosions at alluvial fans that dominantly located at the east valleys of Kelud crater. The erosion removed the volcanic materials up to -5 m which transported and deposited close to the vicinity of the Kelud crater. The deposition process causes the increase of the Kelud crater lake up to 3 m. Moreover, we also mapped the thermal distribution of the Kelud crater lake by using low cost thermal camera. Our thermal investigation is able to identify some hotspots at the vicinity of the Kelud crater lake with range temperature of 43.7°C – 55.3°C, while the average apparent temperature of the Kelud crater lake is ~ 29°C. This high temperature area may indicate underwater active fractures that continuously release volcanic gasses which leads to convection heat transfer through Kelud’s water lake.
Enhancing the knowledge spillover through the formation of the oligocentric national innovation system Yuri V. Preobrazhenskiy; Anna A. Firsova
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.53445

Abstract

The processes of spatial polarization of economic activity and potential of regional innovation systems are an important area of study of the innovation transfer in the global world. The present study continues the scientific discussion on the ratio of concentration and uniform innovation development. The objective of the study is to analyze indicators of spatial concentration of innovation activity and the knowledge spillover between regions in the national innovation system. The main methods are the application of the Herfindal-Hirschman index, as well as cartographic analysis. The analysis of the concentration degree of the following indicators of innovation activity was carried out: patents, developed and used advanced technologies, R&D costs, output of innovative products in these regions of Russia using the Herfindal-Hirschman index. A graphical method was used to identify the main regions of the centers and peripheries, and a map of fragmentation of the country's innovative cores was constructed. The results of the study confirmed the hypothesis of a greater spatial concentration of knowledge in comparison with the release of innovative products. Analysis of potential knowledge spillover between regions showed that the indicators associated with the generation of knowledge, focused on the Russian regions is significantly stronger than the indicators for innovative output: spatial concentration of developed advanced technologies are higher than that used advanced technologies, and the concentration of expenditure on technological innovations ahead of the release of innovative products. This indicates an unbalanced nature of the effects of the innovative spillover, when the use of technologies is more widespread than their development and implementation. Recommendations are also presented on a more efficient organization of the innovation space and on the transition from a monocentric model of organizing a socio-economic space to an oligocentric model to reduce excessive polarization and increase the efficiency of knowledge spillover.
Topography and structural changes of Anak Krakatau due to the December 2018 catastrophic events Herlan Darmawan; Bachtiar Wahyu Mutaqin; Wahyudi Wahyudi; Agung Harijoko; Haryo Edi Wibowo; Nia Haerani; Mamay Surmayadi; Syarifudin Syarifudin; Raditya Jati; Suratman Suratman; Wikanti Asriningrum
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.53740

Abstract

The flank collapse of Anak Krakatau on 22 December 2018 caused massive topography losses that generated a devastating tsunami in Sunda Strait, which then followed by eruptions that progressively changed the topography and structure of Anak Krakatau. Here, we investigated topography and structural changes due to the December 2018 flank collapse and the following eruptions by using high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) before and after the events and sentinel 1A satellite image post-flank collapsed. Results show that the volumetric losses due to the 22 December 2018 flank collapsed is ~127 x 106 m3, while the following eruptions caused ~0,8 x 106 m3 losses. Structural investigation suggests two structures that may act as failure planes. The first structure is located at the western part of volcanic edifice that associated with hydrothermal alteration and the second failure is an old crater rim which delineated an actively deform volcanic cone.
Migration, Landscape Dynamics, and Fishermen Livelihood: A Case Study At East Kalimantan Setiadi Setiadi
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 52, No 3 (2020): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.54700

Abstract

This paper argues for the interrelationship between migration process, dynamics of landscape structure, and sustainable livelihood based on an in-depth study in East Kalimantan, known as a hub of oil and gas and mining industry as well as plantation and housing area for fishing communities. Using anthropological approach, data was collected using a range of methods including observation, GIS-based spatial mapping, household survey, focus group discussion (FGD), and in-depth interviews.Findings of this study showed that the long process of landscape change has affected community livelihood due to differential resource allocation. Intensive migration occurring alongside rapid industrialization has not only increased competition between different interest groups, but has also changed local spatial configuration. Nonetheless, findings also highlighted integration between differentinterest groups which has also influenced livelihood. Such process is a form of ‘smart’ response in showing community resilience and ability to share living space by minimizing conflicts. 

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