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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Geography
ISSN : 00249521     EISSN : 23549114     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Indonesian Journal of Geography ISSN 2354-9114 (online), ISSN 0024-9521 (print) is an international journal of Geography published by the Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada in collaboration with The Indonesian Geographers Association. Our scope of publications includes physical geography, human geography, regional planning and development, cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information system. IJG publishes its issues three times a year in April, August, and December.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography" : 16 Documents clear
Comparison of Various Spectral Indices for Optimum Extraction of Tropical Wetlands Using Landsat 8 OLI Syamani D. Ali; Hartono Hartono; Projo Danoedoro
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.49914

Abstract

This research specifically aims to investigate the most accurate spectral indices in extracting wetlands geospatial information taking South Kalimantan, Indonesia, as an example of wetlands in tropical areas. Ten spectral indices were selected for testing their ability to extract wetlands, those are NDVI, NDWI, MNDWI, MNDWIs2, NDMI, WRI, NDPI, TCWT, AWEInsh, andAWEIsh. Tests were performed on Landsat 8 OLI path/row 117/062 and 117/063. The threshold method which was used to separate the wetland features from the spectral indices imagery is Otsu method. The results of this research showed that generally MNDWIs2 was the most optimal spectral indices in wetlands extraction. Especially tropical wetlands that rich with green vegetation cover. However, MNDWIs2 is very sensitive to dense vegetation, this feature has the potential to be detected as wetlands. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy and prevent detection of the dryland vegetation as wetlands, the threshold value should be determined carefully.
Object-Based Mangrove Mapping Comparison on Visible and NIR UAV Sensor Nurul Khakhim; Muh Aris Marfai; Ratih Fitria Putri; Muhammad Dimyati; Muhammad Adnan Shafry Untoro; Raden Ramadhani Yudha Adiwijaya; Taufik Walinono; Wahyu Lazuardi; Dimas Novandias Damar Pratama; Arief Wicaksono; Azis Musthofa; Zulfikri Isnaen
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.50861

Abstract

Mangrove ecosystems are natural resources that have potential value for development due to their high productivity. Mapping and identification of mangroves have always played a crucial role in mangrove ecosystem conservation efforts, especially to support the sustainable development goal of coastal resources and climate change issues. Several attempts have been made using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) techniques acquisition of high spatial resolution aerial images data with various sensors and object-based classification for image processing with various levels of success. This study aims to identify mangrove objects using UAV with true color and NIR false-color sensors using the OBIA approach. The UAV used in this study was DJI Phantom 3 Pro with a true-color sensor (default) and NIR false-color (modified Canon IXUS 160 cameras). The comparison between the two types of sensor of aerial photographs as a source for mangrove mapping proved that the latter performed better than the former because of the near-infrared band can optimally discriminate between mangrove and non-mangrove objects. This will assist future research directions in the mangrove ecosystems mapping method.
Rural–Urban Transformation and Landuse Dynamics in Gunungpati on the Northern Flank of Mt. Ungaran, Semarang, Indonesia Juhadi Juhadi; Tjaturahono Budi Sanjoto; Elok Surya Pratiwi; Edy Trihatmoko; Istiqomah Istiqomah; Aprillia Findayani
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.52385

Abstract

Most of the northern flank of Mt. Ungaran is subject to intensive land occupation that makes landuse change inevitable. The research objectives of this study were to examine the spatial patterns of land-use dynamics from 1997 to 2018 and to analyze their impact on the rural–urban structure of Gunungpati sub-district using on-screen digitation. Rural–urban structure was analyzed based on landuse composition by area in each village. This research revealed that forest areas and paddy fields were decreasing year by year. Over the study period of 21 years, Gunungpati experienced deforestation of 1,777 ha and increase in built-up area of 1,295 ha, forcing shifting in rural structure. Most villages that were categorized as rural frame zones in 1997 had changed into urban–rural frame zones by 2018. This situation must be controlled, since much of Gunungpati territory plays a significant role as a groundwater recharge zone for the Semarang lowland area.  
Analysis of Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) to Support Tourism Village Promotion in Badung Regency, Bali, Indonesia I Ketut Sardiana; Ni Luh Ramaswati Purnawan; Putu Perdana Kusuma Wiguna; R. Suyarto; Tati Budi Kusmiyarti
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.52556

Abstract

Indonesia’s Tourism Law No. 10 of 2009 states that tourism development needs to integrate diversity, culture and nature uniqueness, and demands. As a popular tourist destination, Badung Regency (Bali, Indonesia) shows similar tourism development across its tourist attractions. Therefore, it is necessary to make a breakthrough in alternatives, including a tourist village. This study aimed to analyze the Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI), including data, standards, policies, technology, and human resources, to promote tourism villages in the area. The WebGIS-based Tourism Geoportal is a technology built to inform tourists, local communities, tourism associations, and local governments. The results showed that, as yet, the Badung Regency Government was not entirely ready to implement SDI to promote tourism villages. Overall, no standards and policies are governing SDI. In addition, the human resources are limited and not specially trained to organize and operate SDI. The available data are relatively complete but are missing metadata and lacking information on attribute data. Testing of the geoportal as a promotional tool for the tourism villages resulted in an agreement on the benefits of SDI to support the development of tourist villages and the importance of establishing local regulations and standards and improving the quality of human resources. 
Modeling Annual Parasite Incidence of Malaria in Indonesia of 2017 using Spatial Regime Anik Djuraidah; Pika Silvianti; Bimandra Djaafara; Siti Nur Laila
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.53290

Abstract

Malaria is an infectious disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite and transmitted through infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. The morbidity of malaria is determined by Annual Parasite Incidence (API) per year. A region with high malaria cases can spread malaria to other regions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the spatial regimes and factors that significantly influence the spread of malaria in Indonesia of 2017. Spatial regime is a method obtained by clustering the coefficient values from the well-known method in modeling spatial varying relationship namely geographically weighted regression (GWR). The data used in this study are malaria Passive Case Detection (PCD) from Puskesmas throughout Indonesia in 2017. The results show three groups which can be classified as regencies/cities with low, medium moderate and high API, while slide positivity rate and annual blood examination are predictors who influent API numbers in Indonesia significantly. 
Preliminary Determination of Footprint Area of Uncontrolled Space Debris: Case Study of Tiangong-1 Space Station Nizam Ahmad; Elisa Fitri
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.54247

Abstract

Indonesia is an archipelagic country consisting of 16,056 islands and covering a vast area around 5,120km x 1,760km. With the largest coastline in the world, Indonesia is vulnerable to the fall of human-made objects from space. Furthermore, the space objects placed at polar and equatorial regions pass over the equatorial region, including Indonesia, more frequently around 4 and 9 times a day, successively depending on their altitudes. Due to the significant probability of the passages, determining the footprint of falling space objects (debris) is mandatory. Therefore, this study examines the demise of Tiangong 1 as a case study. First, trajectory propagation was carried out to track the re-entry point resulting in an estimated footprint area of around 2,632 km x 2,698 km over the Sothern Pacific Ocean.  Second, a mathematical formulation in Astrodynamics was applied to engage a series of assumptions, which led to a more cramped footprint area of around 193km x 12km over a small portion of the South Pacific Ocean. Since the orbital prediction is fraught with great uncertainty, it was very likely that the Tiangong-1 debris fell over the Southern Pacific Ocean of the order of thousands of kilometers.
Determination of a Local Hybrid Geoid as a Height Reference System for 3D Cadastre Margaretha Elya Lim Putraningtyas; Leni Sophia Heliani; Nurrohmat Widjajanti; Trias Aditya
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.55219

Abstract

Use and development of vertical building(s) on land parcel(s) have been a common progress to many urban landscapes around the world. 3D cadastre has been a research area that involves legal, technical and institutional assessments to the use and development of vertical buildings. Initial Land Registration of 3D cadastre objects require a representative geometry to determine the legal boundaries of 3D objects. For that purpose, a height reference that is used to define 3D geometries of registered 3D cadastre objects is important. This study focuses in determining a height reference system by developing a local hybrid geoid for the representation of 3D cadastre. The local hybrid geoid was developed by fitting the gravimetric to the geometric geoid.  Four strategies were utilized, based on the combination of GGM’s SGG-UGM-1 and GO_CONS_GCF_2_SPW_R5, Remove-Compute-Restore method and control point distribution for geoid fitting. Based on comparison with geometric geoid at six independent control points, the local hybrid geoid from strategy 3 produces mean difference of 0.354 m, accuracy of 0.137 m and increased level of closeness of 86%, which is further applied as an alternative reference surface in 3D cadastre.
A Shoreline Change Detection (2012-2021) and forecasting Using Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) Tool: A Case Study of Dahej Coast, Gulf of Khambhat, Gujarat, India Mousumi Dey; Shanmuga Priyaa S; B. K. Jena
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.56297

Abstract

Shoreline is one of the coastal landforms which continuously changing in nature. Hence, monitoring of shoreline change is very obligate to understand and manage the coastal process. The objectives of the present study were i) to identify the shoreline change detection (2012 to 2021) based on various statistical methods along Dahej coast, Gujrat. ii) to forecast the shoreline position after 10 years. DSAS tool and Multi-dated satellite images (Sentinel-2 and LISS-IV) were used in present study. The result shows that, the pattern of rate of change was more or less similar with little variation in the values for the 3 different methods. Highest erosion rate was for End Point Rate, Linear Regression Rate and Weighted Linear Regression rate found -33m, -31m, -31m respectively at transect no 54. Highest accretion rate was 38m (EPR), 50m (LRR), 51m (WLR) along a particular transect. The forecast of shoreline position for the year 2032 observed through Kalman Filter Model. Seasonal analysis for 3 years (2016, 2017, 2018) shows the region not having any seasonal pattern.
Polygon-based Landslide Inventory for Bandung Basin Using Google Earth Sukristiyanti Sukristiyanti; Ketut Wikantika; Imam A. Sadisun; Lissa F. Yayusman; Jevon A. Telaumbanua
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.58014

Abstract

A landslide inventory representing landslide locations is used as a key factor in landslide susceptibility assessment. This paper explores Google Earth (GE) for generating a polygon-based landslide inventory in Bandung Basin. How far GE can identify landslides and their boundaries, source areas, and types were discussed here. Visual interpretation of GE images supported by path tool in GE, official landslide reports, previous research papers, and media was performed. The result is a polygon-based landslide inventory consisting of 194 landslide areas and 194 landslide source areas during 1993-2020. The limitations of GE in preparing the landslide inventory are (1) not covering the timing of the landslide occurrences, (2) tricky to identify small landslides (<100 m2) in anthropogenically transformed areas, and (3) not able to distinguish between earth and debris of landslide material.
Current Dynamics and Water Column Stability in Indonesian Waters Based on Hydrodynamics Model Engki Andri Kisnarti; Nining Sari Ningsih; Mutiara R Putri; Nani Hendriati
Indonesian Journal of Geography Vol 53, No 2 (2021): Indonesian Journal of Geography
Publisher : Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ijg.58091

Abstract

Monsoon currents and Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) have an essential role in the current Indonesian water system. The movement of current/water masses with non-uniform bathymetric conditions will affect the water column's stability in Indonesian waters. Therefore, this study aims to obtain the current dynamics and stability of the water column in Indonesian waters, based on a hydrodynamic model termed the HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM). The results of the model are data of current, temperature, salinity, and density. The data is used to study the dynamics of seawater in Indonesian waters. The water column's stability is examined by calculating the Brunt Väisälä frequency values (N2) based on the density data generated. The results show that monsoon currents were stronger in shallow waters because the stratification did not change. Meanwhile, the maximum N2 value occurs at the surface to a depth of 80-100 m with a range of 0.0000-0.0006 cycle s-1. The study also produces an understanding of the condition of Indonesia's stability (N2 positive), both spatially and temporally.

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