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Contact Name
Regina Veronica Edijono
Contact Email
wacana@ui.ac.id
Phone
+6221 7863528
Journal Mail Official
wacana@ui.ac.id
Editorial Address
Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia Gd 2 , Lt 2 , Depok 16424, Indonesia
Location
Kota depok,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 14112272     EISSN : 24076899     DOI : https://doi.org/10.17510/wacana
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal published by the Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia. It invites original articles on various issues within humanities, which include but are not limited to philosophy, literature, archaeology, anthropology, linguistics, history, cultural studies, philology, arts, library and information science focusing on Indonesian studies and research. Wacana seeks to publish a balanced mix of high-quality theoretical or empirical research articles, case studies, review papers, comparative studies, exploratory papers, and book reviews. All accepted manuscripts will be published both online and in printed forms. The journal publishes two thematic issues per year, in April and October. The first thematic issue consists of two numbers.
Articles 604 Documents
Where is home? Changing conceptions of the homeland in the Surinamese-Javanese diaspora Hoefte, Rosemarijn; Mingoen, Hariëtte
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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In 1890 the first Javanese indentured labourers arrived in Suriname to work on the colony’s plantations. In total almost 30,000 indentured and free immigrants arrived in this small Caribbean colony. Fifty years later, at the end of the migration period, they formed more than one fifth of the population. Consequently, they constituted a substantial community which had to adapt to a different socio-cultural environment but, at the same time, managed to keep in touch with their homeland. The Javanese thus shaped their own cultural expressions and traditions in Suriname. We attempt to analyse the processes of identity formation, adaptation, and re-creation of culture by examining the worlds which the migrants created by looking at four distinct time periods. The first two (1930s and 1950s) focus on the Surinamese-Javanese population’s connections with Suriname and Indonesia, the latter two (1970s and the present century) on Suriname and the Netherlands. The migration of Javanese from Suriname to the Netherlands around Suriname’s independence in 1975 has in effect produced a third homeland. In terms of identity, the Surinamese Javanese themselves now identify strongly with Suriname as they proudly point out “Ik ben een Javaan uit Suriname” (I am a Javanese from Suriname).
Transnational connections; Diasporic (re)turns to Indonesia van Beukering, Jorien
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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In the twentieth century, decolonization sparked mass migration movements across the globe as former settlers left newly independent colonies for the former imperial metropole or a new country altogether. In the following decades, postcolonial migrants made new homes and created communities in their hostlands. Eventually, some travelled back to their country of origin, the former colony. Indisch Dutch returns to Indonesia are not uncommon and, although some members of the first generation visited Indonesia as tourists, accounts of (re)turns by the second and third generation are rare. To form a clearer picture of the transnational connections between Indonesia and the Netherlands, it is important to engage with Indisch Dutch travels to Indonesia after independence. By examining life narratives of second and third generation Indisch Dutch, this article investigates the complex relationships between diaspora, memory, nostalgia, and identity, and their impact on transnational relations between the two countries. Specifically, the paper examines accounts by Adriaan van Dis and Lara Nuberg about their journeys of return to Indonesia in the 2000s.
Introduction Exploring transnationalism Steijlen, Fridus
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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Searching transnational relations between Moluccans in the Netherlands and the Moluccas Steijlen, Fridus
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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This article deals with the transnational relations between Moluccans in the Netherlands and the Moluccas. Former Moluccan colonial soldiers and their families were forced to go to the Netherlands because of political developments in Indonesia after the transfer of sovereignty in 1949. They hoped to return soon to an independent South Moluccan Republic but, more than seventy years later, they still live in the Netherlands. This article first describes how and why Moluccans came to the Netherlands and began to build a community. At the very beginning, the foundations for a transnational relationship were laid through village-based organizations and political organizations. After decades living in exile, the political dimension of the transnational relation assumed great prominence for most Moluccans, later to make place for a more varied transnational relation. The political ideal changed and its priority on the Moluccan “public agenda” dropped until in 1999 a new conflict flared up in the Moluccas. A renewed, altered political transnational relation emerged. The transnational relationship also simultaneously developed in more diverse ways, via development projects, cultural exchange, and the like. By this time, the position of Moluccans in the Moluccas in this transnational relation had also changed.
Indonesian political exiles in the Netherlands after 1965; Postcolonial nationalists in an era of transnationalism Hill, David T.
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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This article presents brief life stories of select Indonesians who were forced into exile by the Suharto regime after the 1965 National Tragedy in Indonesia. It focuses on staunch nationalist exiles who were rendered stateless by the self-proclaimed “New Order“ for refusing to accept the overthrow of President Sukarno and declare loyalty to the military regime. Faced with a life in exile, they sought refuge in the former colonial nation of the Netherlands. After exploring a brief history of exile in the bilateral relationship, it explores the choices made by select individuals who moved to the Netherlands from a variety of other locations of initial refuge. It then explores the frameworks of support which bolster the exiles’ sense of identity as Indonesian (trans)nationalists who reside in the Netherlands, before finally locating the experiences of the exiles in the context of their changing engagement with their homeland.
Objects of belonging and displacement; Artefacts and European migrants from colonial Indonesia in colonial and post-colonial times Drieënhuizen, Caroline
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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As colonial Indonesia never was intended to be a “settler colony”, many Dutch citizens spent only a certain period of their lives there before returning to the Netherlands. However, there were also Europeans, many with Asian-European roots, who had called the colony home for generations and were forced to leave that home after 1945. All these different types of colonial migrants were displaced and maintained, built and reinforced their relations with the country (whether it was the colony or the “motherland”) they had left. This transnationalism (or, as I argue here, imperial orientation) took shape not only legally or relationally but also experientially (D. Ip, C. Inglis, and C.T. Wu 1997). In this article I show how, in both the colonial and post-colonial periods, objects helped European colonial migrants establish and maintain social relationships. Objects shaped identities and people’s status; bolstering increase migrants’ sense of “a continuous transnational self and identity”, a feeling of home, but also feelings of displacement.
Three generations later; Examining transnationalism, cultural preservation, and transgenerational trauma in United States Indo population Stern, Jamie D.
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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This paper examines the relationship between transnationalism, cultural preservation, and transgenerational trauma in the United States (US) Indo population. The information being analysed was compiled by the author from two separate surveys which took place between 2012 and 2021. This data was initially intended to act as a census for the scattered US Indo community however the salient information necessitated that the census be ongoing and that another survey be developed to measure effects of lingering trauma which has been passed down generationally. The two surveys invited Indos from around the globe to participate in data collection, which led to the development of the first Indo population maps of the twenty-first century and hidden impacts of transgenerational trauma. The trauma of the Indo experience during and after World War II affected the first, second, and third generations both similarly and differently with expressions being exacerbated as the population dispersed globally.
The Netherlands-Indies; Rethinking post-colonial recognition from a multi-voiced perspective Immler, Nicole L.
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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In the communication of pain, language matters. Telling someone to feel pain is not just a description of one’s pain, it is – as philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein informs us – also asking for recognition of that pain. This requires a shared language which communicates it. Do we need a new language which can communicate and recognize the pain of the colonial past more effectively? Commencing with the recent apology for waging “a colonial war” in Indonesia by the Dutch prime minister, this article suggests an intervention in post-colonial recognition politics by exploring the idea of the multi-voicedness. Multi-voicedness (Meerstemmigheid) has become a catchword in current public and scholarly debates about the Dutch colonial past and its legacy, in which decades of recognition politics have tended to privilege clear-cut binary identities favouring certain voices above others. There is little conceptual clarity around what the term multi-voicedness entails and even less about its utility in post-colonial discourse. Although commonly associated with juxtaposing different perspectives, this article argues that introducing the lens of multi-voicedness – more specifically the idea of the dialogical self (Hubert J.M. Hermans 2004) – into the recognition discourse, contributes to a better understanding of transnational recognition politics. Capturing the diaspora’s multi-voicedness permits wider scrutiny of what is otherwise a too simplified identity and generation question implicated in post-colonial recognition politics. It will be argued that recognition claims, although supposedly part of an emancipatory struggle, are silencing the multi-voicedness of entangled Indonesian-Dutch family history, the driver for the fight for justice in the first place.
Anton Stolwijk (2021), "Aceh; Kisah datang dan terusirnya Belanda dan jejak yang ditinggalkan" Ichwan, Moch Nur
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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Ronit Ricci (2019), "Banishment and belonging; Exile and diaspora in Sarandib, Lanka, and Ceylon" Sunjayadi, Achmad
Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia Vol. 23, No. 3
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