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Contact Name
Lina Handayani
Contact Email
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Phone
+622744331976
Journal Mail Official
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Editorial Address
JEC Residence D6, Plumbon, Banguntapan, Yogyakarta 55198, Indonesia
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INDONESIA
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn)
ISSN : 20899823     EISSN : 23029277     DOI : https://doi.org/10.11591/edulearn
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) ISSN: 2089-9823, e-ISSN 2302-9277 is a multi-disciplinary, peer-refereed open-access international journal which has been established for the dissemination of state-of-the-art knowledge in the field of education, teaching, development, instruction, educational projects and innovations, learning methodologies and new technologies in education and learning. This journal is ACCREDITED (recognised) SINTA 2 by the Ministry of Research and Technology/National Research and Innovation Agency, Republic of Indonesia (RISTEK-BRIN) (Decree No: 60/E/KPT/2016). The EduLearn is indexed by ERIC Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education. The focus and scope of EduLearn includes the following topics: 1. Career development and training in education and learning: entrepreneurship curriculum, internship programmes, lifelong learning, technology transfer, training educational staff, university-industry cooperation, vocational training, workplace training and employability issues, etc. 2. Experiences in education and learning: curriculum design and development, educational management, educational trends and best practice contributions, enhancing learning and the undergraduate experience, experiences in game based learning, higher education area: the bologna declaration and ects experiences, learning experiences in higher and further education, learning experiences in preschool education, pre-service and in-service teacher experiences, quality assurance/standards and accreditation, special education, stem in education, transferring skills and disciplines, etc. 3. Experiences in education and learning research: academic research projects, research methodologies, links between education and research, new projects and innovations, etc. 4. International projects in education and learning: new experiences for the international cooperation, project outcomes and conclusions, university networks, exchange programmes and erasmus experiences, the internationalization of universities, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 5. Pedagogical innovations in education and learning: learning and teaching methodologies, evaluation and assessment of student learning, accreditation for informal learning, new learning/teaching models, neuroscience in education, language learning innovations, collaborative and problem-based learning, personalized learning, tutoring and coaching, flipped learning, etc. 6. General issues in education and learning: education and globalization, multicultural education, impact of education on development, planning digital-age school and learning spaces, organizational, legal, policy and financial issues, leadership in 21st century education , barriers to learning (age, psychosocial factors, ethnicity...), ethical issues and plagiarism in education, access to internet: advances and problems, diversity issues, women and minorities, student support in education, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 7. Computer supported collaborative work: augmented reality, collaborative virtual environments (CVEs), community building, computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools, social & digital media in education, web 2.0 and social networking: (blogs, wikis...), web 3D applications and virtual reality, etc. 8. E-content management and development: digital identity management, digital libraries and repositories, e-portfolios, intellectual property rights, knowledge management, learning analytics, open access education, security and data protection, user-generated content, etc. 9. Educational software & serious games: animation and 3D systems, computer software on education, educational multimedia and hypermedia, educational software experiences, educational/serious games, gamification, gaming consoles as learning tools, videos for learning (YouTube generation), etc. 10. e-Learning: blended learning, distance learning, educating the educators, e-learning for environmental sustainability, e-learning standards (SCORM), e-learning projects and experiences, e-moderating, e-tutoring & mentoring, intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), learning management systems (LMs), managed learning environments (MLEs), massive open online courses (MOOCs), mobile learning, online assessment, online/virtual laboratories, personal learning environments (PLEs), training, evaluation and assessment, virtual learning environments (VLEs), virtual universities, etc. 11. Emerging technologies in education: advanced classroom technology, best practices in multimedia-based education, BYOD (bring your own device) and 1:1 learning, flipped classroom, ICT for development, ICT skills and digital literacy, mobile and tablet technologies, new platforms to teach coding skills (arduino, raspberry PI,...), technology-enhanced learning, the impact of web technologies on education, web classroom applications, etc. Papers published in the three-monthly journal (Feb, May, Aug, and Nov): (1) report evaluation and research findings; (2) treat conceptual and methodological issues; and/or (3) consider the implications of the above for action; and/or (4) an extensive book reviews section and also occasional reports on educational materials and equipment.
Articles 13 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 10, No 2: May 2016" : 13 Documents clear
Pre-Service Teachers’ Experiences during Off-Campus Observation: Basis for Improving the Roles of Teacher Education Institutions and Cooperating Schools Maripaz C. Abas
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3449

Abstract

Observing experienced teachers is an indispensable part of practicum studies in teacher education.  This paper examined the perceptions of pre-service teachers from five major fields of teacher education program on their experiences during off-campus observation in selected secondary schools. This used qualitative content analysis method in order to “subjectively interpret the content of text data through the systematic classification process of coding and identifying themes or patterns” (Hsieh and Shanon, 2005 p. 1278) . Data were taken from 136 pre-service teachers  through open-ended questions and two high school principals, 10 cooperating teachers, six student supervisors and 12 pre-service teachers through Focus Group Interview (FGI) and Key Informant Interview (KII). Codes and emerging themes were derived using content analysis.  Results showed 18 themes for desirable experiences and 24 themes for undesirable experiences. Pre-service teachers’ experiences mostly focused on students’ attitudes and behaviors. Suggestions to improve off-campus observation from multi-level participants of the study concentrated on preparedness,  orientation programs, supervision and monitoring,  personal attributes and roles, values, attitudes and behaviors, deployment, post conferences,  supervisory plan, observation policies and guidelines,  required documents, seminars, time management, evaluation, coordination, and cultural diversity. To sustain the desirable experiences, both cooperating teachers and student supervisors believed that their roles were to serve as model, guide, leader, monitor, planner, and motivator. The varied experiences of pre-service teachers imply that Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs) and cooperating schools should provide opportunities, develop competencies, take responsibilities and strengthen partnership to enhance off-campus observation.
Exploring the Effect of Morphological Instruction on Vocabulary Learning among Iranian EFL Learners Amirali Khoshkhoonejad; Seyyed Farid Khalifelu; Sahabeh Abdipour
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3316

Abstract

Vocabulary knowledge plays a crucial role in academic development and therefore scholastic success (National Reading Panel, 2000). Also, students' vocabulary knowledge expands through a variety of ways. One of the most practicable strategies in vocabulary learning supported by many researchers is using affix knowledge. The purpose of present study is to investigate the effect of morphological instructions on vocabulary learning among Iranian secondary school students. Participants in this study were sixty Iranian secondary school students who were assigned to control group (30) and experimental group (30). A pre-test and post-test comprising two vocabulary tests measuring students’ morphemic analysis of general English words were administered. The data were analyzed using the Independent Sample T-test to determine if there were improvements made in the two measures within each group, and subsequently whether the magnitude of improvement between the two groups were significant. The results indicated that the experimental group outperformed the control group in the process of guessing the meanings of complex words depending on the morphological analysis.  Furthermore, the results did not show significant differences between Morphological Relatedness Strategy and Morphological Structure Strategy in terms of students' achievements.
Factors of Students Participating in Online Examination Sugilar Sugilar
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3256

Abstract

The purpose of the study is to discover determinant factors of students' participation in online examination based on expectancy-value theory. The method used was group comparison between the groups of participating and nonparticipating students. The results showed that the following factors differentiated the two groups, i.e.: (1) self efficacy in using computers (t=12.81, p less than 0.01), (2) perceived of easiness in operating an online examination (t=9.51, p less than 0.01), (3) perceived of the importance of online examination (t=5.58, t less than 0.01), (4) intrinsic value of online examination (t=10.58, p less than 001), and (5) cost of online examination (t=-2.05, p=0.029). In addition, the following students' personal factors were also compared and the results were (1) age (t=-2.01, p=0.46), (2) grade point average (t=-5.546, 0 less than 0.01), (3) sex (x2=28.51, p less than 0.01), and (4) marital status (x2=6.50, p=0.011). The results concluded that the expectancy and value theory was useful for explaining and predicting students' participation in online examinations.
Linking Educational Institutions with Police Officer Training Programs Nancy Wood; Christine Sereni-Massinger
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3443

Abstract

Community partnerships that are formed through Community Oriented Policing help to assist law enforcement officers with academy education and post academy education. The training offered in the academy and the post academy Field Training Officer Program traditionally places little to no emphasis on critical thinking, professional self-regulation, communication skills or problem-based learning. In the last several years a new approach has been spawned. The Police Training Officer Program (PTO) is an innovative form of education that focuses on problem based learning for post academy graduates. The PTO Program emphasizes adult education, problem solving, emotional intelligence, and conflict resolution. This education is necessary to assist officers in de-escalation strategies within their communities and can lend to the reduction of civil disturbances. However, currently, relatively few agencies are offering this education to their post academy graduates and none are offering it to their academy recruits due, in part, to a lack of qualified instructors. PTO instructors must be proficient and fully trained in problem based learning techniques. Through Community Oriented Policing, law enforcement agencies can address this instructor shortage by partnering with university educational institutions to secure instructors who are competent in andragogy, critical thinking, and problem-based learning.
Application of Employability Skills and Contextual Performance Level of Employees in Government Agencies Maripaz C. Abas
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3429

Abstract

The widespread practice of contractualization even in government institutions is a big challenge facing newly-hired employees in seeking a stable position.  Researchers have argued that the quality of practice of employability skills could help employees have better job performance, provide them better working condition or status, and consequently meet the higher expectations of employers. The present study employs descriptive research design to explain the extent of application of employability skills and contextual performance.  Based on The Conference Board of Canada’s Employability Skills 2000+ and Borman and Motowidlo’s Taxonomy of Contextual Performance, two sets of survey questionnaires were adopted to gather data from 220 respondents representing employers and employees from 25 government institutions. Data analysis showed that novice employees in public institutions applied their employability skills such as fundamental, personal management and teamwork skills to some extent. Moreover, results revealed that employees had satisfactory contextual performance.  Thus, this may suggest that the application of employability skills and contextual behaviors should be enhanced to meet the increasing and complex challenges of their respective government agencies.
The Development of an Earthquake Mind Mapping Sri Adelila Sari; Nurul Husna
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3231

Abstract

The students were difficult to understand about earthquake caused the teaching methods used by teachers were still using the classic method. The teachers only used a textbook to teach the students without any other supporting equipments. Learning process by using the discourse method makes students thinking monotonically, so that only concentrated on the students' understanding of the matter presented by the teacher. Therefore, this study was aimed to develop an earthquake mind mapping to help students in the process of remembering and recording the material being taught by the teacher. The type of this study was Research and Development (R and D). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The samples in this study were class of I-3Madrasah Tsanawiyah (MTs) Darul Ulum Banda Aceh totaling 30 students. The results showed that mind mapping was developed by 5 stages in ADDIE models: analysis (analyzing the problem and find a solution), design (determine the learning strategies), development (producing an earthquake mind mapping to be used in the learning process), implementation (implementing learning activities using the media) and evaluation (evaluating the learning activities). When students instructed to create their mind mapping, it was found that the products of mind mapping categorized in skilled and quite skilled were amounted to 73.33 and 26.66% respectively. As recommendation an earthquake mind mapping could be applied and useful as an effective learning.
The Contribution of the Education System Quality to Improve the Nation’s Competitiveness of Indonesia Dwi Sulisworo
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3468

Abstract

The quality of education and the competitiveness of college graduates in Indonesia is still far behind, both at the international level, even at the level of ASEAN. In the other side, the issue of demographic bonus in Indonesia become an important factor in the development of human resources. The Indonesian population increased continuously about 1.49% per year. The impact of the quality of education is the nation’s competitiveness. Before analyzing its aspects, the data about the nation’s competitiveness can be used as a reference. Although not entirely represent competitiveness, this data can function as an  indicator of progress. Good human resources will be the driving factor for a variety of activities a state and a nation can make, including the economy. In the development of competitiveness, a country is positioned in its change of factor-driven to innovation-driven. The important problems arousing in education are: the quality of school management, quality of research and training, the quality of the education system, and also the higher education participation rate is still low. These four main things that need to be improved in education before it can move to other sectors. The main problem on education in Indonesia is in the low focus on the development of mentality or character. While the analysis of competitiveness problems Indonesia is known that the root problem in competitiveness is the high level of corruption in the country. This is a problem of mentality.
Implementation of Hierarchical Task Analysis for User Interface Design in Drawing Application for Early Childhood Education Mira Kania Sabariah; Veronikha Effendy; Muhamad Fachmi Ichsan
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3470

Abstract

Draw learning in early childhood is an important lesson and full of stimulation of the process of growth and development of children which could help to train the fine motor skills. We have had a lot of applications that can be used to perform learning, including interactive learning applications. Referring to the observations that have been conducted showed that the experiences given by the applications that exist today are very diverse and have not been able to represent the model of learning and characteristics of early childhood (4-6 years). Based on the results, Hierarchical Task Analysis method generated a list of tasks that must be done in designing an user interface that represents the user experience in draw learning. Then by using the Heuristic Evaluation method the usability of the model has fulfilled a very good level of understanding and also it can be enhanced and produce a better model.
Incorporating Sustainability and Green Design Concepts into Engineering and Technology Curricula Radian G. Belu; Richard Chiou; Lucian Ionel Cioca; Bill Tseng
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3259

Abstract

Human society is facing an uncertain future due to the present day unsustainable use of natural resources and the growing imbalance with our natural environment. Sustainability is an endeavour with uncertain outcomes requiring collaboration, teamwork, and abilities to work with respect and learn from other disciplines and professions, as well as with governments, local communities, political and civic organizations. The creation of a sustainable society is a complex and multi-stage endeavour that will dominate twenty first century.  Sustainability has four basic aspects: environment, technology, economy, and societal organization. Schools with undergraduate engineering or engineering technology programs are working to include sustainability and green design concepts into their curricula. Teaching sustainability and green design has increasingly become an essential feature of the present day engineering education. It applies to all of engineering, as all engineered systems interact with the environment in complex and important ways. Our project main goals are to provide the students with multiple and comprehensive exposures, to what it mean to have a sustainable mindset and to facilitate the development of the passion and the skills to integrate sustainable practices into engineering tools and methods. In this study we are describing our approaches to incorporating sustainability and green design into our undergraduate curricula and to list a variety of existing resources that can easily be adopted or adapted by our faculty for this purpose. Our approaches are: (1) redesigning existing courses through development of new curricular materials that still meet the objectives of the original course and (2) developing upper division elective courses that address specific topics related to sustainability, green design, green manufacturing and life-cycle assessment. 
Effects of Reading Skills on Students’ Performance in Science and Mathematics in Public and Private Secondary Schools Ombra A. Imam
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 10, No 2: May 2016
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v10i2.3430

Abstract

In the Philippine education system, reading, mathematics, and science formed part of the core areas of basic education curriculum. For the last decade, the quality of Philippine education was put into a big question due to poor performance of students in mathematics and science tests both local and abroad. The initial result of current efforts of the government by adopting K-12 curriculum didn’t do much to change the status quo. The purpose of this study is to determine the reading predictors of students’ performance in Mathematics and Science and identify its effects to such performance. A total of 660 freshmen students from public and private high schools in Cotabato City, Philippines were taken as sample. A validated and reliable 150-item test in reading comprehension skills, mathematics and science was used to get primary data to perform correlation and regression analysis. Findings showed that only making inference and getting main idea were predictors of mathematics performance of students in public school and private schools, respectively.  Data analysis also revealed that two reading skills such as noting details and making inference had an influence on science performance of students in public school while skills in getting main idea and drawing conclusion influenced science performance of students in private schools.  However, there was only one skill such as vocabulary in context which was predictor of overall science performance of all students. Moreover, separate effects of making inference, identifying main idea explained only 1.8 percent and 1.3 percent of students’ math performance while their combined effects provided only .1 percent or nearly zero percent. Furthermore, the study found out that separate effects of noting details contributed 3.3 percent and its combined effects with making inference explained 4.2 percent of science performance of students in public schools. In terms of effects of reading to science performance in private schools, making inference provided 1.2 percent of separate effect; making inference and drawing conclusion influenced 2.8 percent of combined effect; understanding vocabulary in context has overall one percent of separate effect.

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