cover
Contact Name
Lina Handayani
Contact Email
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Phone
+622744331976
Journal Mail Official
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Editorial Address
JEC Residence D6, Plumbon, Banguntapan, Yogyakarta 55198, Indonesia
Location
Unknown,
Unknown
INDONESIA
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn)
ISSN : 20899823     EISSN : 23029277     DOI : https://doi.org/10.11591/edulearn
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) ISSN: 2089-9823, e-ISSN 2302-9277 is a multi-disciplinary, peer-refereed open-access international journal which has been established for the dissemination of state-of-the-art knowledge in the field of education, teaching, development, instruction, educational projects and innovations, learning methodologies and new technologies in education and learning. This journal is ACCREDITED (recognised) SINTA 2 by the Ministry of Research and Technology/National Research and Innovation Agency, Republic of Indonesia (RISTEK-BRIN) (Decree No: 60/E/KPT/2016). The EduLearn is indexed by ERIC Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education. The focus and scope of EduLearn includes the following topics: 1. Career development and training in education and learning: entrepreneurship curriculum, internship programmes, lifelong learning, technology transfer, training educational staff, university-industry cooperation, vocational training, workplace training and employability issues, etc. 2. Experiences in education and learning: curriculum design and development, educational management, educational trends and best practice contributions, enhancing learning and the undergraduate experience, experiences in game based learning, higher education area: the bologna declaration and ects experiences, learning experiences in higher and further education, learning experiences in preschool education, pre-service and in-service teacher experiences, quality assurance/standards and accreditation, special education, stem in education, transferring skills and disciplines, etc. 3. Experiences in education and learning research: academic research projects, research methodologies, links between education and research, new projects and innovations, etc. 4. International projects in education and learning: new experiences for the international cooperation, project outcomes and conclusions, university networks, exchange programmes and erasmus experiences, the internationalization of universities, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 5. Pedagogical innovations in education and learning: learning and teaching methodologies, evaluation and assessment of student learning, accreditation for informal learning, new learning/teaching models, neuroscience in education, language learning innovations, collaborative and problem-based learning, personalized learning, tutoring and coaching, flipped learning, etc. 6. General issues in education and learning: education and globalization, multicultural education, impact of education on development, planning digital-age school and learning spaces, organizational, legal, policy and financial issues, leadership in 21st century education , barriers to learning (age, psychosocial factors, ethnicity...), ethical issues and plagiarism in education, access to internet: advances and problems, diversity issues, women and minorities, student support in education, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 7. Computer supported collaborative work: augmented reality, collaborative virtual environments (CVEs), community building, computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools, social & digital media in education, web 2.0 and social networking: (blogs, wikis...), web 3D applications and virtual reality, etc. 8. E-content management and development: digital identity management, digital libraries and repositories, e-portfolios, intellectual property rights, knowledge management, learning analytics, open access education, security and data protection, user-generated content, etc. 9. Educational software & serious games: animation and 3D systems, computer software on education, educational multimedia and hypermedia, educational software experiences, educational/serious games, gamification, gaming consoles as learning tools, videos for learning (YouTube generation), etc. 10. e-Learning: blended learning, distance learning, educating the educators, e-learning for environmental sustainability, e-learning standards (SCORM), e-learning projects and experiences, e-moderating, e-tutoring & mentoring, intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), learning management systems (LMs), managed learning environments (MLEs), massive open online courses (MOOCs), mobile learning, online assessment, online/virtual laboratories, personal learning environments (PLEs), training, evaluation and assessment, virtual learning environments (VLEs), virtual universities, etc. 11. Emerging technologies in education: advanced classroom technology, best practices in multimedia-based education, BYOD (bring your own device) and 1:1 learning, flipped classroom, ICT for development, ICT skills and digital literacy, mobile and tablet technologies, new platforms to teach coding skills (arduino, raspberry PI,...), technology-enhanced learning, the impact of web technologies on education, web classroom applications, etc. Papers published in the three-monthly journal (Feb, May, Aug, and Nov): (1) report evaluation and research findings; (2) treat conceptual and methodological issues; and/or (3) consider the implications of the above for action; and/or (4) an extensive book reviews section and also occasional reports on educational materials and equipment.
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 14, No 3: August 2020" : 20 Documents clear
Effects of reading strategies on grade one children’s phonemic awareness performance Solomon Melesse; Chanyalew Enyew
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.14271

Abstract

This study examined the effects of language teaching strategies in Amhara region, Ethiopia on children’s phonemic awareness reading performance. To this end, one hundred and two grade one children of two intact sections (n=50) and (n=52) were selected and participated as experimental and control groups, respectively. The research employed quasi-experimental pre- and post-test research design that aimed at examining the effects of reading strategies in children’s phonemic awareness performance. Besides, the researchers collected data through non-participant observation and teacher self-reflection reports. To analyze children’s phonemic awareness, paired samples t-test was computed using pre- and post-test scores of the children. To analyze the qualitative data, researchers employed narratives based on categories formed considering the basic themes of the research questions of this paper. Findings indicated that phonemic awareness reading strategies used in Amhara region could improve children’s phonemic awareness performance. Furthermore, observation and teachers’ reflections showed that there were positive results on the application of the strategies in improving children’s phonemic awareness. Eventually, recommendations and implications for further research were suggested.
International mobility programs to improve soft skills of Vocational College students and alumni Andri Handayani; Wahyu Kartika Wienanda
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.14538

Abstract

In the workplace, hard skills and soft skills are equally taken into account, especially in this 21st century, where people are required to have ‘global employability skills’ to secure a good job. This study aims to determine the benefits of international mobility programs have on the ability of soft skills, especially in the aspects of communication, social skills and flexibility—as parts of ‘global employability skills’--of students and alumni of a Vocational College within three years from 2017 to 2019. The research method used is by distributing questionnaires Google Form with Likert Scale format from strongly disagree to strongly agree scale 1-5. Research subjects were active students and graduates of Vocational College (Sekolah Vokasi) UGM who had participated in international mobility programs, both incoming and outgoing programs, organized by the OIA SV-UGM, in 2017-2019. The respondents were 60 people. The results showed that the developed soft skills were language and communication skills, interpersonal skills, teamwork, cultural understanding and adaptability and openness. Specifically for alumni, soft skills that are highly developed and helpful in the working world are adaptability and openness (82.9%), cultural understanding (74.3%), language and communication skills (71.4%), ability to work together (65.7%), and interpersonal skills (54.3%).
Technology-driven teaching skills’need of business education lecturers and content delivery in a globalised economy Edet E. Okon; Chris C. Chukwurah
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.14539

Abstract

This paper determined the skills needed by business education lecturers, considering the need for them to be at breast with modern technology in the arts of teaching with emphasis on activity-based learning. This study is further heightened with the need to expose business education students to globalized economy. Thus, the need arises to probe the readiness of business educators (saddled with the responsibility of guiding these students) in terms of their competencies in the use of technology in teaching. This study seeks to achieve one objective, answers one research question and test a null hypothesis. The survey research design is adopted and the study was carried out in Nigeria with an accessible population of 500 business educators, out of which 217 respondents were used. A questionnaire on technology-driven teaching skills and content delivery in Business Education generated data for the study analyzed using Linear Regression Analysis. Findings are that technology-driven teaching skills significantly predict effective delivery of the content of business education. This implies that business educators require skills in the use of modern technology in teaching business education. Based on the finding of this study, it is concluded that the effectiveness of content delivery in business education in today’s globalized society is to an average extent dependent upon the skill level of business education lecturers in the use of technology in teaching. 
Exploring the instructional leadership development practices in Ethiopia Matebe Tafere Gedifew
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.15375

Abstract

The purpose of this study is twofold: to examine the curriculum structure for instructional leaders’ training and development against the desired competences; and to evaluate the career development framework of instructional leaders. With these ends in view, the study examined the instructional leadership framework, the curriculum document, and the instructional leaders’ recruitment, selection and retention strategies. The perspectives of instructional leadership trainers, instructional leaders, zone education department heads, and national level education experts who were selected using a purposive sampling technique were explored through one-on-one interviews. In the light of these, the qualitative data analysis discloses the absence of national instructional leadership framework from which instructional leadership curriculum should have emerged. It was also understood that the loosened curriculum development culture ultimately resulted in the curriculum’s lack of relevance to the desired competences for instructional leadership development. It was further learnt that there existed an absence of context specific recruitment, selection and retention strategies for instructional leaders. It is, therefore, concluded that the instructional leadership development practices of Ethiopia, seemed to have been deviating from expectations. Hence, it is recommended that there is a need to design a national instructional leadership development framework based on which the instructional leadership curriculum development and implementation practices could be managed. The recruitment, selection, and retention strategies should also involve incentive packages that could attract competent candidates to the profession. It is further recommended that there is a need to promote positive mindset exercises for instructional leaders to take their own professional development initiatives. 
Family(ies) in studies about school coexistence in Chile: a systematic review Jonathan Andrades-Moya; Elsa María Castrillón Correa; Eugenio O. Pérez-Álvarez; Andrew Philominraj
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.16582

Abstract

Studies on school coexistence generally focus on the interaction between those who make up an educational institution. Many studies, in Chile, focus on students, teachers, and the management team, leaving aside other educational agents as educational assistants. The present study seeks to: a) Know whether research on school coexistence carried out in Chile considers family(ies) as an educational actor; b) Identify how their participation is assumed in processes related to school coexistence reported by research in this field. A systematic review was carried out for this purpose, selecting 27 articles processed through the prism flowchart. There is little consideration of the family(ies) as an active educational agent in studies of school coexistence in Chile. This makes the family(ies) invisible, reducing their responsibility and possibilities of participation as active agents in the constructive and interactive processes of school coexistence and the educational process of the new generations in their charge. These results show the need to strengthen this field of study and to promote the recognition of the family(ies) as active educational agents in the construction of school coexistence.
The effect of organizational culture, personality, job satisfaction, and trust on school supervisor performance Virgana Virgana; Soeparlan Kasyadi
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.16408

Abstract

This research was about school supervisors who play a strategic role in the management of human resources in the school environment. The study aims to determine the direct and indirect influences of organizational culture, personality, job satisfaction, and trust on the school supervisor's performance. The research samples were 180 supervisors of the school Education Office Special capital Jakarta. Data collection using questionnaires with a Likert scale, before analyzed the obtained data will be validated and reliably in respondents outside of the research sample. Data were analyzed through path analysis, as data analysis requirements were tests of normality, homogeneity, and linearity. Research results there was a direct influence of organizational culture, and personality on job satisfaction; Organizational culture, and personality on trust; Organizational culture, and personality on performance; Job satisfaction, and trust on performance, then there was an indirect influence of organizational culture through job satisfaction on the performance of school supervisor. The conclusion that the performance of the school supervisor at the Education Office of Jakarta was influenced by variations level of organizational culture, personality, and Trust, but the personality of school supervisors should have a priority attention to improving their performance.
An analysis framework of portable and measurable higher education for future cybersecurity workforce development Feihong Liu; Manghui Tu
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.15810

Abstract

An educated workforce is essential to government and industry, hence the need to provide a high-quality workforce has been crucial in higher education academic program development. In the cybersecurity field, the situation is not quite satisfactory, the reason comes down to the fact that this new industry is lacking a portable and measurable framework to evaluate the efficacy of the academic programs, thus, to provide the industry with the unified high-quality workforce. In this paper, we aim to come up with a design of an analytical framework for portable and measurable academic programs for future workforce development.The ultimate purpose for our research is to develop cybersecurity workforce through the increase of the number of cybersecurity professionals with a 4-year degree, in this project we will develop a seamless pathway for students transferring from 2-year programs such as Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana(Ivy Tech) Cybersecurity AAS program to a 4-year program such as Purdue University Northwest(PNW) CIT program.
Factors influencing academic participation of undergraduate students Sari Muthia Silalahi
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.16044

Abstract

This study aims to examine factors influencing aspects such as teacher's personality, student's behavior, environmental which has influence student's affective and cognitive. The data were obtained using methods: interview and questionnaire. The random participant has been chosen for interviewed and population has been used for the questionnaire. There were 1585 participants have filled the questionnaire and 24 students have interviewed. Interview data were recorded and analyzed. The results have processed, it was classified according to study programs following the indicator.  The research finding shows that: factors from lecturers and teaching assistants got 78 - 81%, academic and non-academic facilities got 74.91% - 80.86% and dormitory as living for students got 69.16% which have a big impact on influencing student's affective and cognitive. There were also issues such as teacher's centered-learning, most of students and class situations can often be uncomfortable.
Knowledge on active participation in classroom among nursing and midwifery students Abebe Abera Tesema; Ebrahim Yimam; Sheka Shemsi
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.15645

Abstract

Effective learning-teaching process is ensured when students interact and actively participate in the learning process. Though most instructors stressed the value of active participation in classrooms of universities and colleges, achieving success in eliciting it appears more difficult. There is high tendency of instructors in higher institutions to cover the tasks and responsibilities of their students. The main aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of and to identify strategies for improving active participation in classroom among nursing and midwifery students. Institution based cross-sectional survey was conducted in Jimma University onrandomlyselected 126 students (81 nursing and 45 midwifery). The collected data were coded, checked and cleaned and entered into SPSS version 23 for analysis. Simple descriptive statistics was used to see the frequency distribution whereas cross-tabulation and Pearson Chi-square test were used to see the association between variables. Majority, 106 (84.1%) of the students had good knowledge about the benefits of active participation in classroom and they suggested strategies to be used by regular classroom teachers to improve students’ participation. Students’ academic year has shown statistically significant association with their knowledge about active participation. The authors of this study strongly recommend instructors to use active learning methods and department heads need to follow teaching methods implemented by their respective faculty.
Teachers’ knowledge of children’s mathematical development Mery Noviyanti
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 14, No 3: August 2020
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v14i3.15872

Abstract

This research was conducted due to the importance value of mathematics for early childhood and the fact some researches showed the early childhood education (ECE) teachers' low level of basic mathematical knowledge, especially the one related to childhood developmental stages. The participants of this research were 35 ECE teachers from one of the cities in West Java province with teaching experience approximately ten years. In this research, 30 minutes was given to the participants to solve 20 questions, which tested teachers' knowledge related to verbal counting sequence, counting, the ordinal number of words, addition/subtraction, divisions of sets, written number symbols, and words. Besides, the interview was conducted to get more in-depth information from the participants. The quantitative descriptive analysis was used to identify the frequency, percentage, mean value, and standard deviation. The result of the research showed that ECE teachers had limited knowledge of children's mathematical development. It was revealed by the result of the mean value of the teachers’ responses, which were only 33% correct answers and 16% no idea answers. This result can become input for the stakeholders to hold a professional development program which aims to increase the quality of ECE teachers related to mathematical development activity.

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 20