cover
Contact Name
Lina Handayani
Contact Email
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Phone
+622744331976
Journal Mail Official
edulearn@uad.ac.id
Editorial Address
JEC Residence D6, Plumbon, Banguntapan, Yogyakarta 55198, Indonesia
Location
Unknown,
Unknown
INDONESIA
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn)
ISSN : 20899823     EISSN : 23029277     DOI : https://doi.org/10.11591/edulearn
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) ISSN: 2089-9823, e-ISSN 2302-9277 is a multi-disciplinary, peer-refereed open-access international journal which has been established for the dissemination of state-of-the-art knowledge in the field of education, teaching, development, instruction, educational projects and innovations, learning methodologies and new technologies in education and learning. This journal is ACCREDITED (recognised) SINTA 2 by the Ministry of Research and Technology/National Research and Innovation Agency, Republic of Indonesia (RISTEK-BRIN) (Decree No: 60/E/KPT/2016). The EduLearn is indexed by ERIC Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education. The focus and scope of EduLearn includes the following topics: 1. Career development and training in education and learning: entrepreneurship curriculum, internship programmes, lifelong learning, technology transfer, training educational staff, university-industry cooperation, vocational training, workplace training and employability issues, etc. 2. Experiences in education and learning: curriculum design and development, educational management, educational trends and best practice contributions, enhancing learning and the undergraduate experience, experiences in game based learning, higher education area: the bologna declaration and ects experiences, learning experiences in higher and further education, learning experiences in preschool education, pre-service and in-service teacher experiences, quality assurance/standards and accreditation, special education, stem in education, transferring skills and disciplines, etc. 3. Experiences in education and learning research: academic research projects, research methodologies, links between education and research, new projects and innovations, etc. 4. International projects in education and learning: new experiences for the international cooperation, project outcomes and conclusions, university networks, exchange programmes and erasmus experiences, the internationalization of universities, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 5. Pedagogical innovations in education and learning: learning and teaching methodologies, evaluation and assessment of student learning, accreditation for informal learning, new learning/teaching models, neuroscience in education, language learning innovations, collaborative and problem-based learning, personalized learning, tutoring and coaching, flipped learning, etc. 6. General issues in education and learning: education and globalization, multicultural education, impact of education on development, planning digital-age school and learning spaces, organizational, legal, policy and financial issues, leadership in 21st century education , barriers to learning (age, psychosocial factors, ethnicity...), ethical issues and plagiarism in education, access to internet: advances and problems, diversity issues, women and minorities, student support in education, funding programmes and opportunities, etc. 7. Computer supported collaborative work: augmented reality, collaborative virtual environments (CVEs), community building, computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools, social & digital media in education, web 2.0 and social networking: (blogs, wikis...), web 3D applications and virtual reality, etc. 8. E-content management and development: digital identity management, digital libraries and repositories, e-portfolios, intellectual property rights, knowledge management, learning analytics, open access education, security and data protection, user-generated content, etc. 9. Educational software & serious games: animation and 3D systems, computer software on education, educational multimedia and hypermedia, educational software experiences, educational/serious games, gamification, gaming consoles as learning tools, videos for learning (YouTube generation), etc. 10. e-Learning: blended learning, distance learning, educating the educators, e-learning for environmental sustainability, e-learning standards (SCORM), e-learning projects and experiences, e-moderating, e-tutoring & mentoring, intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), learning management systems (LMs), managed learning environments (MLEs), massive open online courses (MOOCs), mobile learning, online assessment, online/virtual laboratories, personal learning environments (PLEs), training, evaluation and assessment, virtual learning environments (VLEs), virtual universities, etc. 11. Emerging technologies in education: advanced classroom technology, best practices in multimedia-based education, BYOD (bring your own device) and 1:1 learning, flipped classroom, ICT for development, ICT skills and digital literacy, mobile and tablet technologies, new platforms to teach coding skills (arduino, raspberry PI,...), technology-enhanced learning, the impact of web technologies on education, web classroom applications, etc. Papers published in the three-monthly journal (Feb, May, Aug, and Nov): (1) report evaluation and research findings; (2) treat conceptual and methodological issues; and/or (3) consider the implications of the above for action; and/or (4) an extensive book reviews section and also occasional reports on educational materials and equipment.
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 6, No 3: August 2012" : 7 Documents clear
Teaching Competencies of Students Practice Teaching at Elementary Schools and Kindergartens Nur Fatimah
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.158

Abstract

The objective of this study is to describe the teaching competencies of English Education students practising at elementary schools and kindergartens based on the teacher supervisors’ view. The teaching competencies include the students’ competence on writing the lesson plan and their competence on practice teaching. To reach the objectives of the study, the researcher collected the data by distributing a questionnaire to the supervisors at schools. There were 41 schools consisting of TK ABA, SD Muhammadiyah, SD Negeri located in Yogyakarta (24), Sleman (1) and Bantul (16). The questionnaire used was based on the official assessment form published by Indonesian government for teacher’s certification. It contains some indicators of teaching competence, it uses Likert scales ranging from 1 to 5. The criteria are as follows: 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = rather poor, 4 = good, and 5 = excellent. The data were taken from proportionally random sampling of the supervisors. From the total number of 103 teacher supervisors, the researcher distributed 61 questionnaires. The supervisors represented the ones from different educational backgrounds. The findings show the following results. The competence of English Education students in composing the lesson plan, according to the teacher supervisors, is classified good (actual mean = 3.858, SD = 0.685, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.750). Further, their competence on practice teaching is also good (actual mean = 3.867, SD = 0.688, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.966). The two aspects of composing the lesson plan to improve are teaching material organization and the completeness of assessment instrument. The other two aspects to improve in teaching practice are contextual teaching and learning and class management.
Applying to Study English Course at a College: A Study on a Motivational Aspect Thongma Souriyavongsa; Ismail Raob
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.157

Abstract

Incorporating Virtually Immersive Environments as a Collaborative Medium for Virtual Teaming Charles J. Lesko, Jr.; Christine R. Russell
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.162

Abstract

Virtually immersive environments incorporate the use of various computer modelling and simulation techniques enabling geographically dispersed virtual project teams to interact within an artificially projected three-dimensional space online. This study focused on adoption of virtually immersive technologies as a collaborative media to support virtual teaming of both graduate and undergraduate-level project management students. The data and information from this study has implications for educators using virtually immersive environments in the classroom. In this study, we specifically evaluated two key components in this paper: 1) students’ level of trust and; 2) students’ willingness to use the technology, along with their belief about the virtual environment’s ability to extend and improve knowledge sharing in their team work environment. We learned that while students did find the environment a positive add on for working collaboratively, there were students who were neither more nor less likely to use the technology for future collaborative ventures. Most of the students who were not very positive about the environment were “fence sitters” likely indicating needs related to additional training to improve communication skills. Finally, based on the full study results we have provided basic recommendations designed to support team trust building in the system along with interpersonal trust building to facilitate knowledge transfer and better strategic us of the technology.
Perceptions on Multimedia technology by College of Education Teachers Nachi Muthu; Vijaya Kumari
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.160

Abstract

Multimedia means, combination of text, audio, still images, animation, video and interactivity content forms delivered electronically. e-learning is a process and e-content is a product. The objectives of the study are to find out the significant relationship between the college of education teachers’ perception towards multimedia technology on the basis of gender wise, locality wise, maritial wise, subject wise, technical skill wise, experience wise and possessing degree wise. Evaluation of Multimedia Perception scale (EMPS) developed by the investigator with a relaibility of 0.89 and it collected 350 teachers from Tamil Nadu State of Indian Context. From the analysis, there is no significant differences between the perceptions of multimedia technology in terms of gender, locality and maritial status. The same perception was rejected on the basis of  subject, technical skills, higher degree level and their experiences. The quality of learning depends not only on the form of how the process is carried out but also on what content is taught and how the content is presented.
Challenges in Providing Trainings for English Teachers of Elementary Schools Nury Supriyanti
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.159

Abstract

Primary English provision in Indonesia has started in 1994 in which English has the position as the local content subject in the elementary schools. English has then been part of the Indonesian elementary schoolchildren’s daily routines in many different ways. In the major cities, which are geographically then educationally more privileged,  the children might enjoy their English lessons because they have the qualified teachers who know English and how to teach it to young learners, they have appropriate and interesting materials as well as  appropriate techniques  to learn by. The case is quite different for the children of the less privileged areas where access to qualified teachers, appropriate materials and fun learning is almost impossible. These children have to be content with teachers with no English or child teaching background who are hired because only them who are available. The paper  describes the struggle of  the English Education department of the Yogyakarta State University  in the development of the EFC courses  in order to contribute to the provision of  English to elementary schools in Indonesia.
Tools for collaboration across STEM fields James A. Ejiwale
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.161

Abstract

Supporting learners at different stages of learning is essential to achieve positive learning, critical thinking, technical and problem solving skills, and gainful employment upon graduation. Collaboration is critical to providing strong foundational educational support to all learners as they advance to higher level of learning. More important is the need to promote collaboration among educators and other professionals across the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields who educate the learners throughout their academic pursuit in their respective institutions of learning. To reap the value in diverse teams, the promotion of emergent interdependence fosters seamless collaborative activities across STEM disciplines.  For industrial technology programs to prepare students with skills necessary to supervise and manage the future workforce of any organization successfully, necessary tools must be utilized for the success of the collaborative effort. This paper addresses leadership and knowledge sharing among collaborators, the educational aspects of research facilities and research clusters as some of the tools necessary to develop program through collaboration in STEM fields.  
Home Literacy Environment of African American Head Start Children Janese Daniels
Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn) Vol 6, No 3: August 2012
Publisher : Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.11591/edulearn.v6i3.156

Abstract

Researchers have documented culturally specific family literacy practices in which low-income families engage, which are often a function of the context in which the family is currently embedded.  These practices are well documented in ethnographic literature. Although this evidence exists, its utility is limited due to small sample sizes and lack of quantitative documentation on their contribution to children’s language and literacy development.  This study attempted to quantify those culturally specific family literacy practices.  51 low-income African-American mother-child dyads participated.  The contribution of multiple literacy practices was examined in relation to child language and literacy outcomes.  Most low-income African-American families engaged in multiple literacy practices.  Recommended areas for future research directions are discussed.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 7