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Al-Jami´ah: Journal of Islamic Studies
ISSN : -     EISSN : -     DOI : -
Core Subject : Religion,
Al-Jamiah, a journal of Islamic Studies published by Al-Jami'ah Research Centre of State Islamic University Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta since 1962, can be said as the oldest academic journal dealing with the theme in South East Asia. The subject covers textual and fieldwork studies with various perspectives of law, philosophy, mysticism, history, art, theology, and many more. In the beginning the journal only served as a scholarly forum for the lecturers and professors at the State Institute of Islamic Studies. However, due to the later development with a broader readership, the journal has successfully invited scholars and researchers outside the Institute to contribute. Thus, Indonesian and non-Indonesian scholars have enriched the studies published in the journal. Although not from the beginning Al-Jamiah presents highly qualified scholarly articles, improvement—in terms format, style, and academic quality—never ceases. Now with articles written in Arabic and English and with the fair procedure of peer-review, Al-Jamiah continues publishing researches and studies pertinent to Islamic studies with various dimensions and approaches.
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Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 45, No 2 (2007)" : 12 Documents clear
Unquestioned Gender Lens in Contemporary Indonesian Shari‘ah-Ordinances (Perda Syariah) Candraningrum, Dewi
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.289-320

Abstract

Indonesian muslim participation in the democratic arena is now contested with the arrival of the decentralization process in 423 districts since 1992. The most notable movement is the quest for Islamic identity in the rejuvenation of Shari ‘ah Ordinances which is interpreted symbolically and transcripturally. These ordinances have unrecognized the importance of gender lens in its practice. Until the end of 2007 no less than 63 districts have ratified Perda Syari’ah. In general, these ordinances designed to govern three aspects of public life, namely (1) to eradicate social crimes especially prostitutions and gambling; (2) to enforce ritual observances among Muslims such as reading the Qur’an, Friday congregations and fasting during Ramadan; and (3) to govern the way people dress up in public sphere especially the head-veiling for women. Although Islam is the religion of the majority there are also non-muslim among Indonesian and institutionally Indonesia is not an Islamic state, therefore the ratification of Perda Syari’ah betrayed national consensus agreed upon by the founding fathers of the republic.
On Human Rights and the Qur’anic Perspective: Freedom of Religion and the Rule of Apostasy Almirzanah, Syafa’atun
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.367-388

Abstract

It is often argued that Islam is not compatible with modernity. This can be seen for instance in the fact of the problem that Islam faces to the challenge of universal values of human rights. Built on this supposition, the present article discusses on the great extent the question of religious freedom in Islam. As freedom of religion in the framework of universal declaration of human rights can mean as freedom to change religion, this contradicts to Islamic prohibition of apostasy, punishable with death penalty. The author argues that Islam in fact guarantees religious freedom. This is clear from the Quranic injunctions assuring the freedom of choice whether to embrace Islam or not. Such a freedom is however often contradicted to one prophetic tradition sanctioning death penalty for apostasy. In her view, the author believes that the hadith more in attunes to the political strategy of the prophet to safe Muslim community from any acts of treason or sedition. Death penalty for apostasy is thus not related to the mere personal crime of changing religion but more that of public law related to war or crimes against state. More relying on the modern interpretation of the Quranic verses as well as the prophetic traditions, the author concludes that Islam is in conjunction with the modern values of religious freedom in which personal choice of religion or belief is the backbone of human rights.
Editorial: Islam and Human Rights, Contested Viewpoints
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.vii-x

Abstract

The remaining problem faced by Muslims living in this modern life is how the teachings of Islam believed as bless for all human being can be confirmed in the reality of everyday life humanity crammed with conflicts and dissonances. It is staggering to consider that not all Muslims concern, and perhaps do not wish to know, about the current discourse on Islam and its relation with others. Although Samuel Huntington’s controversial theory of “Clash of Civilization” might be challenged by most Muslim circles, the heightening conflict involving Western and Islamic civilizations in the aftermath of September 11, 2001 has approved his theory. The attack of terrorism to the US soil has triggered not only the unremitting war on terror undergone towards the alleged Muslim terrorists worldwide but also the worsening relationship between the two civilizations believed to have been engulfed since the two decades before. Candidly, this phenomenon has also affected the intra-faith dialogue among Muslims having different thought of religion.
Examining Asghar Ali Engineer’s Qur’anic Interpretation of Women in Islam Nuryatno, M. Agus
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.389-414

Abstract

This article discusses Asghar Ali Engineer’s interpretation of women in Islam. Two topics discussed in this article are the status of women in Islam and the veil. Engineer offers an approach in understanding the Qur’an to deal with these topics and his method is based on three principles: firstly, the Qur’an has two ingredients: normative and contextual. Normative ingredient refers to the fundamental values and principles of Qur’an such as equality and justice, and these principles are eternal and can be applied in various social contexts. Contextual revelations, on the other hand, deal with verses that were tailored to socio-historical problems of the time. In line with the changes in context and time these verses can be abrogated. Secondly, the interpretation of the Quranic verses is very dependent on one’s own perceptions, world-view, experiences and the sociocultural background in which he/she lives. Thus, a ‘pure’ interpretation of the Scripture is not possible; it is always influenced by sociological circumstances, no one can be free of such influences. Thirdly, the meaning of the Quranic verses unfolds with times, therefore, the interpretations of classical scholars can be radically different from the interpretation of modern scholars. This is because Quranic verses often use symbolic or metaphorical language that is ambiguous in meaning. This ambiguity serves, of course, to promote flexibility and creative change. These three principles can be employed to understand the status of women in Islam and the veil.
Islam and Human Rights in Indonesia: An Account of Muslim Intellectuals’ Views Fuad, Ahmad Nur; Arbaiyah, A.; Mughni, Syafiq; Jainuri, Achmad
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.241-287

Abstract

The issue of Islam and human rights has become important issue in Indonesia at least since the last two decades. Indonesian Muslims have developed two different approaches to human rights: in complete agreement with the declaration of universal human rights; and in resistance to that declaration and developing understanding that Islam encompasses human rights values. The article argues for its part that human rights are not absolutely universal, because they are based chiefly on Western values, structures, ethics and morality. For that, it is reasonable to question their universality. The present article focuses on how Indonesian Muslim intellectuals conceive of human rights and Islamic values as they perceive the two. Specifically, it focuses on four principal issues in human rights discourse: freedom of opinion, religious freedoms, rights of women, and criminal law. The authors reveal in the conclusion that although some Indonesian Muslim intellectuals admit that universal human rights are truly universal, they still see differences in certain cases, due to differences in socio-cultural background. They have tried to affect a synthesis between the universality and particularity of both Islamic and universal human rights in order to make both fit within the Indonesian context.
Unquestioned Gender Lens in Contemporary Indonesian Shari‘ah-Ordinances (Perda Syariah) Candraningrum, Dewi
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.289-320

Abstract

Indonesian muslim participation in the democratic arena is now contested with the arrival of the decentralization process in 423 districts since 1992. The most notable movement is the quest for Islamic identity in the rejuvenation of Shari ‘ah Ordinances which is interpreted symbolically and transcripturally. These ordinances have unrecognized the importance of gender lens in its practice. Until the end of 2007 no less than 63 districts have ratified Perda Syari’ah. In general, these ordinances designed to govern three aspects of public life, namely (1) to eradicate social crimes especially prostitutions and gambling; (2) to enforce ritual observances among Muslims such as reading the Qur’an, Friday congregations and fasting during Ramadan; and (3) to govern the way people dress up in public sphere especially the head-veiling for women. Although Islam is the religion of the majority there are also non-muslim among Indonesian and institutionally Indonesia is not an Islamic state, therefore the ratification of Perda Syari’ah betrayed national consensus agreed upon by the founding fathers of the republic.
Current Debates in the Post-Soeharto Indonesian Islam: Examining the Intellectual Base of Liberal and Anti-liberal Islamic Movement Muzakki, Akh.
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.321-366

Abstract

This article discusses intensively the current debate between those who support and against liberalism within pluralized Indonesian muslims. The two groups are represented by JIL (Jaringan Islam Liberal) and MD (Media Dakwah). The author compares three fundamental aspects of religious interpretations: epistemological assumptions, methodological framework, and subject-matter. Epistemological assumptions deal with philosophical foundations that are employed by JIL and MD as principles to understand Islam. Methodological framework means the way the two groups understand and interpret Islam and its teaching based on their philosophical foundations. In terms of subject-matter, the author discusses six issues, namely (1) ijtihad, (2) approaches to text, (3) the meaning of truth, (4) the minority and the oppressed, (5) freedom of religion, and (6) mundane and spiritual authority. From the three fundamental aspects of religious interpretations that are compared, the author concludes that JIL is a group of muslims who understand Islam by implementing liberalism, while MD represents a group of muslim who promote conservatism, purification, and anti-liberalism within Indonesian Islam.
Islam and Human Rights in Indonesia: An Account of Muslim Intellectuals’ Views Fuad, Ahmad Nur; Arbaiyah, A.; Mughni, Syafiq; Jainuri, Achmad
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre, Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.241-287

Abstract

The issue of Islam and human rights has become important issue in Indonesia at least since the last two decades. Indonesian Muslims have developed two different approaches to human rights: in complete agreement with the declaration of universal human rights; and in resistance to that declaration and developing understanding that Islam encompasses human rights values. The article argues for its part that human rights are not absolutely universal, because they are based chiefly on Western values, structures, ethics and morality. For that, it is reasonable to question their universality. The present article focuses on how Indonesian Muslim intellectuals conceive of human rights and Islamic values as they perceive the two. Specifically, it focuses on four principal issues in human rights discourse: freedom of opinion, religious freedoms, rights of women, and criminal law. The authors reveal in the conclusion that although some Indonesian Muslim intellectuals admit that universal human rights are truly universal, they still see differences in certain cases, due to differences in socio-cultural background. They have tried to affect a synthesis between the universality and particularity of both Islamic and universal human rights in order to make both fit within the Indonesian context.
Editorial: Islam and Human Rights, Contested Viewpoints
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.vii-x

Abstract

The remaining problem faced by Muslims living in this modern life is how the teachings of Islam believed as bless for all human being can be confirmed in the reality of everyday life humanity crammed with conflicts and dissonances. It is staggering to consider that not all Muslims concern, and perhaps do not wish to know, about the current discourse on Islam and its relation with others. Although Samuel Huntington’s controversial theory of “Clash of Civilization” might be challenged by most Muslim circles, the heightening conflict involving Western and Islamic civilizations in the aftermath of September 11, 2001 has approved his theory. The attack of terrorism to the US soil has triggered not only the unremitting war on terror undergone towards the alleged Muslim terrorists worldwide but also the worsening relationship between the two civilizations believed to have been engulfed since the two decades before. Candidly, this phenomenon has also affected the intra-faith dialogue among Muslims having different thought of religion.
Examining Asghar Ali Engineer’s Qur’anic Interpretation of Women in Islam Nuryatno, M. Agus
Al-Jamiah: Journal of Islamic Studies Vol 45, No 2 (2007)
Publisher : Al-Jamiah Research Centre

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14421/ajis.2007.452.389-414

Abstract

This article discusses Asghar Ali Engineer’s interpretation of women in Islam. Two topics discussed in this article are the status of women in Islam and the veil. Engineer offers an approach in understanding the Qur’an to deal with these topics and his method is based on three principles: firstly, the Qur’an has two ingredients: normative and contextual. Normative ingredient refers to the fundamental values and principles of Qur’an such as equality and justice, and these principles are eternal and can be applied in various social contexts. Contextual revelations, on the other hand, deal with verses that were tailored to socio-historical problems of the time. In line with the changes in context and time these verses can be abrogated. Secondly, the interpretation of the Quranic verses is very dependent on one’s own perceptions, world-view, experiences and the sociocultural background in which he/she lives. Thus, a ‘pure’ interpretation of the Scripture is not possible; it is always influenced by sociological circumstances, no one can be free of such influences. Thirdly, the meaning of the Quranic verses unfolds with times, therefore, the interpretations of classical scholars can be radically different from the interpretation of modern scholars. This is because Quranic verses often use symbolic or metaphorical language that is ambiguous in meaning. This ambiguity serves, of course, to promote flexibility and creative change. These three principles can be employed to understand the status of women in Islam and the veil.

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