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INDONESIA
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences
ISSN : 23375779     EISSN : 23385502     DOI : -
Core Subject : Engineering,
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences welcomes full research articles in the area of Engineering Sciences from the following subject areas: Aerospace Engineering, Biotechnology, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Physics, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Information Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Material Science and Engineering, Manufacturing Processes, Microelectronics, Mining Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, and other application of physical, biological, chemical and mathematical sciences in engineering. Authors are invited to submit articles that have not been published previously and are not under consideration elsewhere. Starting from Vol. 35, No. 1, 2003, full articles published are available online at http://journal.itb.ac.id, and indexed by Scopus, Index Copernicus, Google Scholar, DOAJ, GetCITED, NewJour, Open J-Gate, The Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek EZB by University Library of Regensburg, EBSCO Open Science Directory, Ei Compendex, Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) and Zurich Open Repository and Archive Journal Database. Publication History Formerly known as: ITB Journal of Engineering Science (2007 – 2012) Proceedings ITB on Engineering Science (2003 - 2007) Proceedings ITB (1961 - 2002)
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 1,212 Documents
SOLVENT EXTRACTION OPTIMIZATION OF CHLOROPHYLL DYE FROM CONOCARPUS LANCIFOLIUS LEAVES Jassim, Nawras Jameel
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
Publisher : ITB Journal Publisher, LPPM ITB

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Abstract

Recently, the green food industry has started using chlorophyll dye as a healthy and safe color additive for food and beverages. In this study, a conventional extraction technique was used to extract chlorophyll dye from Conocarpus lancifolius leaves, using 80% acetone as solvent. Taguchi?s L25 orthogonal array was utilized to optimize the extraction parameters with total chlorophyll dye yield as the response. The optimum extraction conditions were 75 minutes of extraction time, 33.5 °C extraction temperature and a 118 ml/g solvent to raw leaves ratio. Analysis of variance using Minitab18 was conducted to identify the most significant extraction parameters and available interactions. It was found that the chlorophyll dye yield from Conocarpus lancifolius leaves is mostly dependent on extraction time, followed by mixing ratio and temperature. The analysis showed a large interaction between the extraction parameters studied. The experimental chlorophyll dye yield was in close agreement with the predicted model. The adequacy of the predicted model was confirmed by an experiment conducted under the optimal conditions, given a 3.9% error percentage.
IDENTIFICATION OF MICRO-PLASTICS (MPS) IN CONVENTIONAL TAP WATER SOURCED FROM THAILAND Babel, Sandhya; Kankanige, Dinuka
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
Publisher : ITB Journal Publisher, LPPM ITB

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In a period when MP contamination of drinking water is a great concern, this study focused on the size- and morphology-based count, and polymeric identification of plastic particles in tap water sourced from Thailand. A total of 45 human consumable samples (each 1 L) were collected at Thammasat University. The average MP counts sorted by Nile Red tagging were 56.0±14.0 p/L (6.5-53 µm) and 21.0±7.0 p/L (53-300 µm), while those found by optical microscopic observations were 13.0±5.0 p/L (300-500 µm) and 6.0±3.0 p/L (? 500 µm). A significantly high MP amount was observed in the 6.5-53 µm fraction. Fibers dominated in all samples, accounting for 58% of the particle count. Most ? 300 µm particles tested by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy were confirmed to be polymeric, identified as PE, PVC, PET, PA, PTFE, PP, and PAM. These particles may have escaped from the treatment plant or were added along the water distribution network. Since MPs in drinking water constitute a potential health risk by exposing humans to direct plastics intake, MP contamination in water supply systems should be controlled.
COMPARISON OF SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS OF MEDICAL-GRADE 316L STAINLESS STEEL PROCESSED BY SAND-BLASTING, SLAG BALL-BLASTING AND SHOT-BLASTING TREATMENTS Salim, Urip Agus; Mahardika, Muslim; Suyitno, Suyitno; Arifvianto, Budi
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
Publisher : ITB Journal Publisher, LPPM ITB

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In this research, a comparative study was carried out to examine the surface characteristics of medical-grade 316L stainless steel after blasting treatments by using angular silica particles, spherical slag balls and spherical metallic shot. The surface roughness, morphology, elemental composition and microhardness distribution of the stainless steel were determined and the possible mechanisms in the evolution of the surface characteristics of the steel exposed to the blasting treatments were established. The results showed that all the blasting treatments conducted in this research increased the roughness and hardness of the steel surface. In this case, the roughest stainless steel surface was achieved by the slag ball-blasting treatment, but the stainless steel with the hardest surface and the thickest hard subsurface layer was obtained by the shot-blasting treatment. On the basis of the findings in this research it can be concluded that the physical properties and surface morphology of particles or shot used in the blasting treatment are critical parameters in determining the surface characteristics of blasted stainless steel.
DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRODE DEPOSITION METHODS FOR SCALE-UP OF DYE SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS Devianto, Hary; Nurdin, Isdiriayani; Adriaan, Adriaan; Utomo, Mhd Ridho; Koto, Hilham Zamriko; Widiatmoko, Pramujo; Ananda, Wisnu; Mutiari, Anies
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
Publisher : ITB Journal Publisher, LPPM ITB

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This research studied the effect of electrode deposition method on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Four deposition methods (bar coating, doctor blade coating, screen printing, and spray coating) were compared. For commercial production purposes, applicability of the methods to a scaled-up DSSC was studied. In order to minimize the production cost, commercial activated carbon was utilized as counter electrode. The experimental results showed that the doctor blade technique provided the best DSSC performance among the investigated methods. Based on the study of cell I-V characteristics, the photoelectric conversion efficiency of the DSSC with an electrode active area of 70 cm2 was significantly lower than with 5 cm2 despite using the same deposition method. The electrochemical characteristics of the cells were further studied using electrochemical impedance analysis.
COVER JETS VOL. 50 NO. 5, 2018 Technological Sciences, Journal of Engineering and
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 50, No 5 (2018)
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PHYTOREMEDIATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINATED SOIL WITH THE ADDITION OF COMPOST Ratnawati, Rhenny; Faizah, F.
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
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Phytoremediation is an alternative technology for processing mercury (Hg) contaminated soil. The objective of this study was to treat Hg contaminated soil by adding compost using Sansevieria trifasciata and Celosia plumosa. The variations of the composition of the growth media were 100% contaminated soil and 80% contaminated soil with 20% compost. The plants used were aged 1 month and 30 cm high. The reactor was a polybag with a diameter and height of 25 cm. Sampling was conducted once every 7 days for 28 days. This research showed that the reactor with growth media consisting of 80% contaminated soil and 20% compost with Sansevieria trifasciata and Celosia plumosa had an Hg removal efficiency of 75.63% (58 mg/kg) and 66.81% (79 mg/kg), respectively. The Hg removal efficiency with growth media consisting of 100% contaminated soil was 74.79% (60 mg/kg) and 65.55% (82 mg/kg) in the reactor with Sansevieria trifasciata and Celosia plumosa respectively.
RECONNAISSANCE ON LIQUEFACTION-INDUCED FLOW FAILURE CAUSED BY THE 2018 MW 7.5 SULAWESI EARTHQUAKE, PALU, INDONESIA Nawir, Hasbullah; Hayakawa, Jun; Tada, Naoto; Hidayat, Risqi Faris; Kiyota, Takashi
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
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The Mw 7.5 Sulawesi Earthquake 2018 was a catastrophic disaster that resulted in large numbers of casualties. This study aimed to investigate the damages of liquefaction-induced-flow failure in three areas in Palu city, i.e. Petobo, Balaroa, and Jono Oge. It was found that this flow failure occurred on a large scale at a very gentle ground inclination, ranging from 1 to 3%. In order to gain an understanding of the soil conditions in these specific locations, Portable Dynamic Cone Penetration Tests were conducted in Petobo. The results showed that the soil layers in the affected area were in a loose state compared to the non-affected areas. Furthermore, some spots of freshwater inundation were recognized in Petobo and Balaroa, even two weeks after the disaster. Based on this evidence, a mechanism of liquefaction-induced-flow failure caused by a confined aquifer is proposed.
ADSORPTION OF GOLD FROM AQUEOUS SYSTEMS USING MICROBIAL THERMOPHILIC PROTEINS Chang, Jo Shu; Kasmiarno, Laksmi Dewi
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
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A precious metal such as gold can be obtained from mining. Metals in low concentrations at geothermal sites or in industrial waste are difficult to gain using the conventional mining process. Alternative approaches for recovering metals from dilute solutions have been developed, such as biosorption, i.e. adsorption using microorganisms or their derivatives. In this study, gold in an aqueous system was recovered via biosorption using proteins produced from an isolated thermophilic bacterial strain. Modified Thermus enhanced medium was used as the medium to improve protein production from the thermophilic bacterial strain. The microbial proteins showed effective conditions for Au3+ ion adsorption. The optimum adsorption conditions for Au ions occurred at pH 1 with an adsorption capacity of 482.0 mg/g protein. The metal ion adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature. The adsorption isotherm was conducted at room temperature, because the Au ions could be well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm equation with qmax at 527.229 mg/g protein.
PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BIOPOLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANES BASED ON LICLO4-COMPLEXED METHYL CELLULOSE AS LITHIUM-ION BATTERY SEPARATOR Wahyuningrum, Deana; Bundjali, Bunbun; Arcana, I Made; Ndruru, Sun Theo Constan Lotebulo
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
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The polymer electrolyte membrane is a main component of lithium-ion batteries (LiBs), serving as separator and electrolyte. In this work, we prepared biopolymer electrolyte (BPE) membranes of lithium perchlorate (LiClO4)-complexed methyl cellulose (MC). Methyl cellulose (MC), a cellulose derivative, has attractive properties for use as biopolymer electrolyte. The bulkier anion size of lithium salt (LiClO4) significantly enhances the performance of biopolymer electrolyte (BPE) membranes. The fabricated biopolymer electrolyte (BPE) membranes were characterized by FTIR, EIS, tensile tester, XRD and TGA. Biopolymer electrolyte membranes with various weight percentages of LiClO4 salt (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) were prepared using a simple solution casting technique. Incorporation of 10% weight of LiClO4 into the MC-based host polymer was selected as optimum condition, because this yielded good conductivity (3.66 x 10-5 S cm-1), good mechanical properties (tensile strength 35.97 MPa and elongation at break 14.47%), good thermal stability (208.4 to 338.2 °C) as well as ease of preparation and low cost of production. Based on its characteristics it can be stated that the 10% LiClO4-complexed MC membrane meets the requirements as a candidate separator for lithium-ion battery application.
DEVELOPING A PLASTIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM: FROM RIVER BASINS TO URBAN BEACHES (CASE STUDY) da Silva, Alisson Caetano; Neto, Alfredo Ribeiro; Montenegro, Suzana M.G.L.; da Silva, Simone Rosa; Falcão, Symone M.P.; Moura, Micaella R.F.
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences Vol 52, No 1 (2020)
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Solid waste accumulation in coastal environments has been a growing concern. In the coastal megacity of Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, plastic waste issues currently exist both at the ocean scale and river basin scale. The city is known as the ?Brazilian Venice? thanks to the Capibaribe River, which crosses many neighborhoods, running in a west-east direction into the Atlantic Ocean. This paper provides the initial basis to develop a Plastic Waste Management Program proposal for implementation in the city of Recife, given the lack of resolutions that have looked at plastic waste management through integrated water environment scales (from river basin to ocean). The methodology used included articulation and documental collection from four main public agencies from the state/city and stakeholders. The results showed its relevance for better plastic waste management in Recife, considering an integrated water environment on a river basin-to-ocean scale by using the recognized major connected water environments (Capibaribe river and Boa Viagem beach). Similar integrated program proposals could be made for other coastal areas, enabling not only the identification of fragilities but also the exchange of information regarding the theme.

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