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INDONESIA
Indigenous: Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi
ISSN : 08542880     EISSN : 2541450X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Humanities, Art,
Indigenous: Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi is a media for Psychology and other related disciplines which focus on the finding of indigenous research in Indonesia.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021" : 7 Documents clear
The role of optimism bias and public trust in the goverment on non-compliant behaviour with health protocols Gita Nuraini Agustina; Rahkman Ardi
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.13391

Abstract

Abstract. The occurrence of risky actions by the community and the inconsistencies of government policies regarding Covid-19 pandemic led to community non-compliance with the health protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of unrealistic optimism bias and public trust to the government towards non-compliance behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was a quantitative study with data collection procedures using the survey method. The three questionnaires i.e. the unrealistic optimism bias, public trust in government, and non-compliance behavior, have been adopted from the previous studies and validated using CVI for the purpose of this study. There were 740 participants ranging between 18-25 years old. Stepwise regression analysis was conducted. The resultsshowed that the unrealistic optimism bias and public trust to the government simultaneously contributed to non-compliance behavior in which the unrealistic optimism bias had the highest contribution to noncompliance behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study implies that the government and intervention agencies need to pay attention to the factors of cognitive biases by the individuals and public trust issues for improving the public adherence to the health protocols.Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic; non-compliance behavior; public trust in government; unrealisticoptimism bias.
Meta-analysis of dimension of autonomy on the psychological well-being measurement in Indonesia Heliany Kiswantomo; Ria Wardani
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.11945

Abstract

Since it was raised more than two decades ago, research on Psychological Well-Being (PWB) in Indonesia has invited many interested people to follow up. This situation is in line with the development of the overall orientation of Positive Psychology as a form of renewal from conventional psychological orientation. A large number of PWB studies carried out in Indonesia provides quite broad theoretical and practical implications. In general, the data obtained through these studies use group norms on respondents who are relatively small in size, so that their findings are not accurate in providing a description of PWB in the group of respondents studied. Among the six dimensions psychological well-being (self-acceptance, personal growth, positive relations with others, purpose in life, environmental mental mastery, and autonomy), dimensions autonomy often show findings with lower scores than other dimensions. The purpose of this study was to find a profile of the dimensions of autonomy. The research method used is a meta-analysis and confirmation analysis of approximately 100 results of existing research, with a respondent size of around 3,000 people. After getting the score standard autonomy from the meta-analysis study, it will be continued by distributing the PWB questionnaire to around 844 respondents emerging adulthood. This research moved from the basic assumption that Indonesian culture was different from a western culture where the initial research of this PWB was developed. These cultural differences will then form different behaviors in displaying dimensions autonomy in everyday life.   Keywords: autonomy; meta-analysis; positive psychology; psychological well-being; emerging adulthood.
Promoting resilience among family caregiver of cancer through Islamic religious coping Iswan Saputro; Fuad Nashori; Rr. Indahria Sulistyarini
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.13581

Abstract

The burden of the family caregivers in providing care to family members who have cancer can reduce resilience. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of religious coping training to enhance the resilience in the sample of family caregivers of cancer disease. Eight family caregivers of cancer disease participated in this study. The participants were divided into intervention group (n = 4) and control group (n = 4). The pre-test post-test control group design was used in this study as the research design and assessed at three points (pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 2-week follow-up). The participants completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) to assess any changes in resilience. An intervention module was prepared based upon Pargament, Smith, Koenig, and Perez (1998) and modified using Islamic coping strategies based upon the positive religious coping concept. The results showed that the intervention group participants reported a significant increase in resilience compared with the control group. Participants also reported positive changes in interpreting the role of family caregivers. This study discussed the implications and limitations of the finding.
Manifestations of polyculturalism in Indonesia: A study of indigenous psychology. Nurul Khasanah; Muhammad Fath Mashuri; Diah Karmiyati
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.12436

Abstract

Abstract. Polyculturalism is an ideology that emphasizes the interaction between certain cultures. Polyculturalism is considered to minimize prejudice and potential conflicts, while studies on polyculturalism in Indonesia are still limited. The purpose of this study is to find out the aspects of polyculturalism in Indonesia and what conditions make individuals open to establish relationships with other individualsso that it has the potential to become the nation's glue. This research uses indigenous psychology approach with mix method design. Subjects selected with the criteria of Indonesian Citizens (Citizens), aged 18 years and over, and have migrated more than 2 years (between cities / provinces in Indonesia). Dataanalysis was carried out in two ways, firstly a qualitative analysis that is making a categorization system through the bottom up indigenization model. Second, conduct quantitative analysis using descriptive analysis and chi-square test. The results of this study reveal aspects of cultural equality as national identityincluding, tolerance, citizenship, culture and race. While aspects that distinguish cultures in Indonesia consist of cultural, racial, geographical and religious rituals. Furthermore, aspects that make individuals establish inter-group relations include curiosity about other cultures, social relations, tolerance, geography, environment, openness, individual values, and emotional conditions. The psychological implications of these results also form part of the research in this study.Keywords: identity; indigenous pychology; polyculturalism
Spiritual emotional freedom technique (seft) to reduce the diabetes distress in people with diabetes mellitus Wardiani Priyanto; Rahma Widyana; Metty Verasari
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.12867

Abstract

This study aimed to examined the effectiveness of Spiritual Emotional Freedom Technique (SEFT) for Healing to reduce the diabetes distress levels in people with diabetes mellitus at productive age. Participant in this study were 12 people, 33-61 years old male and female with moderate and high levels of diabetes distress as measured with diabetes distress scale/ DDS17. This research design was an experimental pre-post-test control group design with exeperimental group and control group. The data analysis technique used in this study was statistical analysis with the Wilcoxon sign rank test and the Mann whitney U-test. The results of the Wilcoxon Sign Rank Test showed a significance value of p= 0.028 (p 0.05) and was strengthened by the results of the Mann Whitney U-Test with a significance value of p= 0.004 (p 0.05) and a decrease in the value of x̅ = 63.33 to x̅ = 20.33, which means there is a significant difference in the level of diabetes distress in people with diabetes mellitus at productive age before and after being given the SEFT for Healing intervention. These results indicate that SEFT for Healing can reduce the level of diabetes distress and the hypothesis is accepted. SEFT for healing is proven effective and can be used as one of the therapy to reduce the distress in people with diabetes.
Ethical conduct-do and general well-being among university students, moderated by religious internalization: An Islamic perspective Daliman Daliman
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.14886

Abstract

Although topics related to well-being are being studied, those which focused on Islamic values, principles, and beliefs in this region is still sparse. The purpose of this study is to identify the correlation between (1) Islamic ethical conduct-do and the general Islamic well-being, (2) Islamic religious internalization and Islamic general well-being, and (3) Islamic ethical conduct-do and Islamic general well-being, moderated by Islamic religious internalization. Data collection was carried out in October 2019 and involved the 1st semester students of the 2019-2020 academic year in the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta. The subjects were selected using parallel sampling by choosing students from parallel classes; as many as 74 students were selected. The research instruments met the requirements of convergent and discriminant validity, as well as reliability. Data analysis was undertaken with the help of the PLS moderation program. The results indicated the following: (1) Islamic ethical conduct-do has a positive significant relationship with university students’ Islamic general well-being; (2) Islamic religious internalization has a positive significant association with university students’ Islamic general well-being; and (3) Islamic ethical conduct-do was significantly correlated with university students’ Islamic general well-being, Islamic religious internalization as a moderator variable.Keywords: Islamic ethical conduct-do; Islamic general well-being; Islamic religious internalization; Islamic well-being; Islamic religiousness
Indonesia's mental health status during the Covid-19 pandemic. Meiliza Izzatika; Rizma Adlia Syakurah; Ilsyafitri Bonita
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 2, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i2.14024

Abstract

Abstract. This study aims to analyze Indonesia's mental health status during the Covid-19 pandemic. The study is an observational analytic study used a cross-sectional approach. The research was conducted to Indonesian population. Convenience sampling was used to select 1458 Indonesians as the research sample. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-42) was utilized in this study, which was translated, validated, and disseminated through social media from April 12 to 25 2020. Data analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney, Chi-square tests, and logistic regression with a significance value of p 0.05 (OR and 95%CI). The incidence of depression, anxiety, and stress was 20.8%, 34.6%, 25.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, respondents who experienced depression, anxiety, and stress categorized as moderate to very severe were 12.4%, 26.3%, and 16%. Factors that influenced mental health during the Covid-19 pandemic are career background in health care and commit health behaviors (washing hands after coughing, sneezing, and touching the nose). The government is expected to carry out effective risk communication, maximize COVID-19 response policies in Indonesia, and actuate mental health services by small communities in their environment thus mental health problems preventive can be resolved immediately.Keywords: Covid-19; mental health; depression; anxiety; stress; Indonesia.

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