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INDONESIA
Indigenous: Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi
ISSN : 08542880     EISSN : 2541450X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Humanities, Art,
Indigenous: Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi is a media for Psychology and other related disciplines which focus on the finding of indigenous research in Indonesia.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021" : 7 Documents clear
Organizational support and job satisfaction: Meta-analysis study Susatyo Yuwono
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.14079

Abstract

Abstract. This study aims to determine the relationship between organizational support and job satisfaction. Using the meta-analysis approach, the hypothesis is proposed that there is a relationship between organizational support and job satisfaction. Previous studies used 19 articles containing 22 research results that have F, t, d, and r values. The total sample obtained was 11,257 samples with various backgrounds. The analysis show that the population correlation coefficient after being corrected by the number of samples is 0.57. Referring to the 95% significance level, the acceptance limit is between 0.3687 r 0.7648. Thus the results of 0.57 are at the acceptance limit. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the hypothesis that there is a relationship between organizational support and job satisfaction is acceptable. These results strengthen the relationship between organizational support andjob satisfaction.Keywords: organizational support, job satisfaction, meta-analysis
Depression, anxiety, and stress among students of Sriwijaya University Umrohtul Habibah; Rizma Adlia Syakurah; Diyaz Syauki Ikhsan; Eka Febri Zulissetiana; Syarifah Aini
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.12629

Abstract

Abstract. The prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) among students was the highest (18.5%), followed by anxiety (16.7%). Psychosocial stressors and academic pressure on students require them to be able to adjust themselves in order to cope with the mental stress that occurs. The aims to descriptions of mental health, especially depression, anxiety, and stress in students. An analytic observational study with a cross-sectional design used. As much 1564 students from 10 faculties filled out the DASS-42 questionnaire distributed via social media in January 2020−24 August 2020. The analyzed using chi-square, Mann Whitney, and binary logistic regression with significance of 0.05. Students who have a risk to depression, anxiety, and steress are 46%, 74.2%, and 57.9%. There is a significant relationship between the incidence of depression with GPA, faculty, semester and place of residence (p0.05). Gender, faculty, and religion factors associated with the anxiety (p0.05). While the gender, place of residence and faculty associated with stress (p0.05). History of chronic illness and family history of mental disorders influenced the depression, anxiety disorders, and stress (p 0.001). Mostly, Sriwijaya University students have an increase in depression, anxiety, and stress, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. The gender, semester, marital status, history of chronic disease, and a history of mental disorders in the family affect the incidence of depression, anxiety, and stress. The mean GPA of students with a tendency to depression, anxiety, and stress was lower by ± 0.03 points. The university stakeholders needs to implement mental health interventions to maximize student potential.Keywords: Mental disorders; college students; depression; anxiety; stress
Pelatihan Online Psikologi Positif Berbasis Nilai Islam untuk Meningkatkan Resiliensi Mahasiswa Dian Kusuma Hapsari; Usmi Karyani; Wisnu Hertinjung
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.14043

Abstract

Abstract. University students are vulnerable to psychological problems, including Muslim university students. One of the reasons is the low resilience level. Therefore, an intervention is needed to develop the resilience of Muslim students so that it is expected to face difficulties and at the same time encourage self-development to protect students from psychological problems. The intervention will be better if it is adjusted to the values held by students, one of which is religious values. However, psychological interventions based on religious values to increase student resilience have not been developed much. This study aims to examine the effect of Islamic-based positive psychology online training on the improvement of university students’ resilience. The training modules were prepared based on the positive psychology intervention techniques and integrated with Islamic values. The training consists of six sessions and was delivered via Zoom meeting. This study employed a quasi-experiment with a one-group design pretest-posttest. The target participants of this study were Muslims students of the Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta. Participants who took part in this study received information that was announced through several social media. The study participants were 10 Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta students. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) was used to measure the resilience in Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta’s students. The data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA and the results showed the scores of p = 0.005 (p 0.05). This result showed that online positive psychological training with Islamic values improves the university students’ resilience. Online positive psychology training based on Islamic can be used for promotive programs to improve Muslim students' mental health in Indonesia.Keywords: Islamic values; online training; positive psychology; resilience; university students
How do internal factors impact career adaptability of undergraduate Papua students? Rose Mini Agoes Salim
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.14213

Abstract

Abstract. The data from this study show that students from the region of Papua tend to have difficulty adapting to lectures, have low graduation rates, have difficulty attending lectures, and so on, indicating a low likelihood of career adaptability. The distinctive characteristics of Papuan people result in many of them conforming to social influences, such as friendships while prioritizing friendships over academics. On the other hand, students from the region of Papua who excelled at the lecture may have an intrinsicunderlying value to their success. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the career adaptability of Papuan students as influenced by core self-evaluation (CSE) and perceived peer support (PPS) as internal factors. The respondents of this study were 176 Papuan undergraduate students enrolled in universities throughout Papua and other provinces in Indonesia. The instruments of this study, which were distributed online, included the Social Provision Scale, the Core Self-Evaluation Scale, and the Career Adaptability Scale.Data processing was carried out by using multiple regression with stepwise method. The results show that CSE and PPS significantly contribute to the career adaptability of Papuan students in tertiary institutions. These results are expected to provide insight into the significance of developing a positive core self-evaluation and perceptions of peer support to increase career adaptability. The limitation is in online data collection, which limits feedback if some items are not understood. In addition, it is not possible to determine the seriousness of the respondents when filling out the questionnaire. The average respondents already have fairly good CSE indicating fairly good educational orientation, which is different from thegeneral phenomenon observed in other Papuan students.Keywords: career adaptability; core self-evaluation; perceived peer support; Papuan undergraduate students.
Prediticing academic procastinantion in students: Perfectionism, general self-efficacy, and sociodemographic factors Ria Wardani; Ira Adelina; Juliati Ardhi Santoso
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.15558

Abstract

Abstract. Procrastination is frequently found in around 30% to 60% of college students. Research that examines academic procrastination is associated with adaptive-maladaptive perfectionism, general self-efficacy, and sociodemographic factors, expected to gain a comprehensive understanding of procrastination so that anticipatory and countermeasures can be implemented. The target population of this study was male and female college students from state and private universities. The questionnaire was distributed physically and digitally (google-form) to 208 participants using the snowball sampling technique. Theresearch instrument consisted of the Academic Procrastination Scale (APS), The Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), General Self-Efficacy (GSE), and questions on sociodemographic factors. All research instruments have been tested and met the criteria of validity and reliability. After the data cleaning and coding process, the data were assessed using multiple regressions dan hierarchical regression. The data analysis revealed that perfectionism and self-efficacy were generally predictors of procrastination. Similarly, from the results of model testing, all sociodemographic factors simultaneously affected procrastination, but gender was in line with influencing procrastination. Research findings show that procrastination was more motivated by many anxieties due to excessive attention to mistakes and doubts in acting. This research has limitations, namely the origin of the participating universities, primarily private universities rather than state universities. As a result, the level of variability of data sources tends to below. However, this study results can be followed up to address the issue of academic procrastination.Keywords: academic procrastination; adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism; general self-efficacy; sociodemographic
Factors mediating work-family balance to job satisfaction in higher education during pandemic Ni Gusti Made Rai; Aurelius Ratu; Eka Dian Savitri
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.15505

Abstract

Abstract. The covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on the family and work domains and has forced married employees to adapt to the new condition and strive to achieve the workplace’s established goals. However, given the health risk involved in this situation, can they be satisfied with their job? This question arose because some studies showed that flexibility and more incentive payments were considered to support job commitment, and therefore job satisfaction. Thus, our main concern is whether job satisfaction can becompensated solely through incentive payment, which is economics. Although job satisfaction is intended to measure the quality of employment, those studies presumably amplified the imbalance between work and family relationships. This current study investigates job satisfaction for married employees by highlighting the family domain and exploring the intervening factors that play significant roles during the pandemic.The results of multiple regression analysis of 264 married employees of (with sig 0.1 or 0.05) and path analysis bring our attention to work aspects that appear to be more worrisome than family concerns. As an effort to monitor the quality of employment, it will be ambiguous if, for the sake of job satisfaction, the organization have to pay more incentive payment for increasing commitment without paying more attention to a broader context of the situation. Practical policy implications of the findings of this study are also discussed.Keywords: family balance; job satisfaction; married employee; work balance
Prosocial intentions towards religious ingroup and outgroup members among adolescents from public and religious schools Farah Aisyah Azzahra; Sutarimah Ampuni
Indigenous Vol. 6 No. 3, 2021
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23917/indigenous.v6i3.15401

Abstract

Abstract. Prosocial behavior is a very important component in harmonious social relationships, especially within a diverse community such as Indonesia. Public and religion-based schools provide different opportunities for students in terms of interaction with peers from different religions, and in turn may affect attitudes toward ingroup and outgroup religious members. This study compared prosocial intentions towards religion-based ingroup and outgroup peer members in adolescents from heterogeneous (public) schools and homogenous (Islamic) schools. Participants were 220 Muslim middle school studentsaged 11-15 years, who attended public schools (N= 130; M=48, F=82) and religious schools (N=90; M=46, F=44). They were recruited through snowball sampling and convenience sampling. This research is a quasi-experimental study, by using the Scenario-based Prosocial Intention Questionnaire (SBPIQ) to measure prosocial intentions, which was modified to include manipulations on the targets of prosocial intention. Two-way mixed ANOVA results showed that the level of prosocial intention was highest toward the ingroup target (M=3,411; SD=0,392), followed by those toward the outgroup (M=3,357; SD=0,403) and neutral targets (M=3,234; SD=0,411). Furthermore, prosocial intentions towards ingroup, outgroup, and neutral targets were all higher in students from public schools. Theseresults implied that there were biases in students’ prosocial behaviors toward ingroup/outgroup religious members. It is crucial for both public and Islamic schools to facilitate positive interactions with members of other religious group in order to overcome these biases.Keywords: ingroup-outgroup, interreligious, prosocial intention, prosocial behavior, adolescents, homogeneous/heterogeneous school

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