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Contact Name
Ali Awaludin
Contact Email
ali.awaludin@ugm.ac.id
Phone
+6287852654297
Journal Mail Official
jcef.ft@ugm.ac.id
Editorial Address
Jl. Grafika No.2 Kampus UGM, Yogyakarta 55281
Location
Kab. sleman,
Daerah istimewa yogyakarta
INDONESIA
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum
ISSN : 25811037     EISSN : 25495925     DOI : https://doi.org/10.22146/jcef
Core Subject : Engineering,
JCEF focuses on advancing the development of sustainable infrastructure and disseminating conceptual ideas and implementing countermeasures, particularly in the tropics, which are vulnerable to disasters. Specifically, we look to publish articles with the potential to make real-world contributions to improving both local communities and countries readiness for and responsiveness to natural and human-made disasters. The particular emphasis of JCEF is given to the civil & environmental engineering researches associated with natural disasters such as geo-disaster (earthquake, landslide, and volcanic eruption), water-related disaster (flood, debris flow, coastal disaster, and tsunami), and human-made disasters such as soil, water, and air pollution and water scarcity. Articles describing the topics of disaster risk reduction techniques, disaster early warning system, climate change adaptation, vulnerability analysis and trends, pre and/or post-disaster reconstruction and rehabilitation planning and management, forensic engineering, the socio-engineering approach for the countermeasures, or water reuse and recycle are particularly encouraged.
Articles 20 Documents
Tsunami Early Warning System Based on Maritime Wireless Communication Aryanti Karlina Nurendyastuti; Mochamad Mardi Marta Dinata; Arumjeni Mitayani; Muhammad Rizki Purnama; Mohammad Bagus Adityawan; Mohammad Farid; Arno Adi Kuntoro; Widyaningtias
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 2 (May 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1552.707 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.2878

Abstract

Tsunami buoy, linked to satellite, is commonly used as a tsunami early warning system but has been discovered to have several drawbacks such as the need for approximately 5 minutes to issue an early warning for a tsunami after detecting the initial wave as well as its fragility. It was also reported that the twenty-two buoys placed in the Indonesian seas from 2012 to 2018 were damaged and missing. Therefore, this study proposes a new method for tsunami early warning by integrating ship-to-ship maritime wireless communication. It is important to note that vessels or fishing boats with over 30 GT have the ability to travel more than 100 nmi (approximately 180 km) from the shoreline and can be equipped with point-to-multipoint VHF radio communication. Meanwhile, smaller boats on the fishing ground located approximately 2-5 km from the shore can use a WiFi network to communicate like a wireless mesh while the existing terrestrial network can be used for the ship-to-shore communication between boats and land stations. This system is expected to provide significant benefits for a fishing town such as Pangandaran, West Java, Indonesia which is directly facing Java Megathrust in the Indian Ocean. Therefore, a tsunami numerical simulation was conducted in this study using Shallow Water Equation which involved a hypothetical tsunami simulated from the possible fault source which is approximately 250 km from the source. Moreover, the vessel’s location was assumed to be in line with the fishing ground while the arrival time of the tsunami was estimated from the model to be 22.5 minutes and compared to the relay time of the proposed system which was approximately 5.4 seconds. This is faster in terms of delay than the existing system which relays information through satellite at approximately 5 minutes in an ideal condition and also has the ability to reduce the need for tsunami buoys.
Shear Strength and Durability Behaviors of Compacted Weathered Clay Shale Mixture Using Portland Cement Pintor Tua Simatupang; Idrus M. Alatas; Ayu K. Redyananda; Eko A. Purnomo
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 2 (May 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2960.818 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3491

Abstract

The use of weathered clay shale often has the potential to cause geotechnical problems as an embankment material, especially slope failures. In order for weathered clay shale to be used as embankment material, the weathered clay shale must be mixed with other materials. An example of a widely used mix is a mix with a Portland cement (PC). In general, this mixture will increase the shear strength of the embankment material. In addition to shear strength, it is very important to investigate whether the material mixture is susceptible to durability. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the shear strength and durability behaviors of weathered clay shale mixture, using PC. The percentage of this cement was varied and did not exceed 20%, with the mixing material also compacted based on Proctor Standard procedure. This test included the determination of shear strength and durability index at the smaller and larger (dry and wet sides) than optimum moisture content (OMC). Shear strength and durability index were determined by Triaxial and slake durability index tests, respectively. The results showed that the weathered clay mixture with 10% PC and 8% larger OMC led to an increase in the normalized shear strength (∆σ/σ) and durability index at approximately 300% and 24%, respectively, compared to the original clay shale. This indicated that the optimum shear strength and durability of this shale mixture were highly observed at 10% PC and 8% larger OMC (wet side). This verified also although the durability index increased by 97% with the addition of 20% PC, whose utilization was found to be unrealistic
Implementation of Agent Based Modelling to Observe the Evacuating Behavior at Faculty of Engineering Building, University of Bengkulu, Indonesia Hardiansyah; Wida Fitrianip; Annisa Fitria Edriani; Robi Hardiansyah; Rizka Lestyanti; Lindung Zalbuin Mase
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 2 (May 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (6134.376 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3589

Abstract

Evacuation is an important issue during the occurrence of an earthquake, due to the influence of people’s responsive behaviours to the disaster. This indicates the occurrence of overcrowded conditions, which causes the conflict of people’s movement. It is also one of the main reasons the process of evacuation is difficult, leading to the necessity to specifically model the movement within each building. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the earthquake evacuation modelling in Faculty of Engineering building, University of Bengkulu, Indonesia. This used a multi-agent programmable modelling environment known as NetLogo, which adopted an ABM model that is often utilized to observe elemental movement response. The agents occupying the building also moved to the stairs and evacuation doors, for exit towards the assembly point, which was located in front and behind Faculty of Engineering. The agent-based modelling is then conducted by inputting the layout of the building and the number of occupants in each room. Furthermore, the simulations were performed by considering various agents’ capacity in the building, during the evacuation. The results showed the time taken for the agents to exit the building during the disaster. This confirmed that the required exit time generally decreased with the increasing population percentage in the building. During this process, the conflict point also occurred around the corridor of Floors 1 and 2 (T1, T2 and T3), as well as the exits of the building (P1, P2, P3, and P4). This was due to the occurrence of a high density when agents carry out evacuation movements. Based on these results, the placement of signs was recommended, as guidelines during the evacuation process.
Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Drought Hazard Index (DHI) by Integration AHP-GIS-Remote Sensing in Gorontalo Regency Muhammad Ramdhan Olii; Aleks Olii; Ririn Pakaya
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1802.066 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3595

Abstract

Several regions across the world are presently experiencing a continuous increase in water scarcity due to the rise in water consumption resulting from population development, agricultural and industrial expansion, climate change, and pollution. Droughts are increasing in recurrence, severity, duration, and spatial extent as a result of climate change. Drought will be one of the most serious threats posed by climate change, often in conjunction with other effects such as rising temperatures and shifting ecosystems. Therefore, this study analyzes the spatial distribution of the Drought Hazard Index (DHI) by integrating AHP-GIS-Remote Sensing in Gorontalo Regency. AHP was used to determine the significance of each map as an input parameter for the DHI, while GIS-Remote Sensing was utilized to supply and analyze all input maps and the study outcome. The DHI assessment consists of four criteria, namely with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index accounting for the highest proportion at 42.9%, followed by Land Surface Temperature (33.6%), Normalized Difference Moisture Index (16.8%), and Topographic Wetness Index (6.7%), with the consistency of the underlying expert opinion measured by the consistency ratio of 0.048. The results indicated that the general hazard of drought in the Gorontalo Regency area was low (43.53%), with 17.87% of the whole area experiencing high hazard. The high class of drought was discovered to be centered in the central region of Gorontalo Regency, which was mostly used for agricultural and economic purposes, thereby enabling policymakers to have evidence to develop management policies suitable for local conditions. Therefore, despite the limits of climatology data, this study established the value of satellite-derived data needed to support policymakers in guiding operational actions to drought hazards reduction.
Factors Affecting Cyclist Behaviours in the Special Region of Yogyakarta Danang Febrianto; Dewanti; Imam Muthohar
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (360.369 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3596

Abstract

Bicycle-riding/cycling has reportedly become a new trend in various cities of Indonesia, as well as the Special Region of Yogyakarta, amidst the social restriction applied by the Government to decrease the spreading rate of the COVID-19 virus. This is observed to be a healthier effort in strengthening the immune system during the pandemic. However, the positive growth of this trend is proportional to the increasing data on bicycle accidents. This was due to the increased rate of injured and dead victims from 2017 to 2020. The human behavior factor is also one of the factors causing the high rate of these bicycle accidents. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the factors affecting the behavior of cyclists in the Special Region of Yogyakarta, to reduce the continuous increase of accidents. The data used in this study were the result of the Cyclist Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ) on the Yogyakarta riders. The samples were obtained through the purposive sampling method, using an online questionnaire with a google form and acquiring 362 respondents. Furthermore, the analytical method used was the structural equation modeling (SEM), through the AMOS 22.0 software. The results indicated that the regulation scale directly affected risk perception and cyclist behaviors (risky and positive). However, age only affected their behaviors, which did not directly affect the accidents. The regulation scale then directly affected the risky behavior of cyclists, with risk perception observed as the mediator, implying that the cyclists' knowledge of road safety regulations influenced individual behaviors. In conclusion, these results are expected to be one of the considerations in the policy of the government, to carry out the overall development of transportation, especially bicycles.
Finite Element Modelling of Prestressed Concrete Piles in Soft Soils, Case Study: Northern Jakarta, Indonesia Aswin Lim; Varian Harwin Batistuta; Yiska Vivian Chritiansen Wijaya
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (842.844 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3597

Abstract

Jakarta is faced with limited land resources due to its position as the capital city of Indonesia. Therefore, numerous high-rise buildings are being constructed to solve this problem and provide accommodations for a large number of Jakarta residents. Studies have shown that prestressed concrete piles (spun piles) are commonly used as the foundations of high-rise buildings in metropolitan cities across Indonesia, especially in the Northern Jakarta Coastal area, which is predominant with deep soft soils deposit. To further assess and verify the ultimate capacity of the pile, a static loading test was conducted. However, not all results from the field test produced ideal, accurate, precise, and reliable load-settlement curve (until failure) results. Therefore, this study aims to determine the soil properties for the analysis of prestressed concrete spun piles with a diameter of 600 mm in the Northern Jakarta coastal area based on the standard penetration test values (SPT-N). It is a case study of a well-documented static pile load test using the kentledge system. Back analyses were performed by the finite element method to obtain the extrapolated load-settlement curve. Furthermore, the effect of interface strength between pile and soil on the load-settlement curve was also investigated. The results showed that a reduction of interface strength leads to a smaller load–settlement curve. In addition, several geotechnical engineering parameters of soil, such as the undrained shear strength and effective young's modulus, were established using data from an in-situ soil site investigation and empirical correlations with SPT-N.
Optimizing The Functional Performance of Road Network using Vulnerability Assessment to Cope with Unforeseen Road Incidents Mukhammad Rizka Fahmi Amrozi; Raihan Pasha Isheka
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (988.824 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3598

Abstract

An Urban Road network is often used for multipurpose trips, due to their transportation functions, such as attractiveness and orientation, as well as social, ecological, and economic features. In Indonesia, road incidents have reportedly increased during the last decade because of a higher frequency of natural hazards, accidents, and on-street mass demonstrations. These incidents are found to degrade or terminate road access, forcing users to utilize alternative routes and decreasing the service performance in adjacent directions. Due to the unexpected occurrences at any location and time, there is a need to investigate the impact of random incidents on road performances. Several accessibility indexes have also been used to evaluate the vulnerability of road networks. However, this is less practical in Indonesia, with the road authority using functional performances as the indicator. This indicates the need for an index to be developed based on road performance parameters. Therefore, this study aims to develop a road performance-based vulnerability index known as the RCI (Road Criticality Index). Combined with a traffic simulation tool, this system is used as an alternative index to assess vulnerabilities, by identifying the road(s) providing worse consequences due to unforeseen incidents. This simulation was conducted by using the PTV Visum, assuming a road section is closed due to the worst incident scenarios. The result showed that the RCI offered a more comprehensive assessment than the existing indicator (volume capacity ratio). The RCI included travel speed and mobility components for evaluating both local and global road performances. With the knowledge of the most vulnerable locations and their consequences, road authorities can prioritize maintenance and development strategies based on the criticality index. Also, preventive measures should be conducted to mitigate risk under a constrained budget. This methodology can be applied to sustainably enhance the resilience of urban road networks.
Organic Removal Treatment Using Microbubble Generator (MBG) in Eutrophic Disorder Condition Tri Yulianti; Sri Puji Saraswati; Johan Syafri Mahathir Ahmad; Wiratni Budhijanto
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (703.51 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3599

Abstract

The Techno Park basin, built as an extension of a small tributary of the Code River primarily acts as a retention basin for runoff during the rainy season. It improves the quality of water that has been degraded by domestic wastewater discharge from the surrounding community. Therefore, this study aims to assess the extent to which water quality of the basin can be improved with aeration technology. The aeration technology is a Microbubble Generator (MBG) built using a 100 Watts submersible pump with three horizontal nozzles at a depth of 40 cm from the water surface. Furthermore, the profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration were measured at the basin’s inlet and outlet, as well as the depths of 1 m below surface water and the bottom of the basin. Diurnal DO was measured to investigate the causes of supersaturation. The aeration performance was also determined from the COD parameters at the inlet and outlet. Discharge measurements were then conducted on the tributary/drainage channel to the inlet basin. The result showed that the DO supersaturation concentration has been attributed to the contribution of photosynthesis from phytoplankton such as algae. Furthermore, no change in DO concentration was observed in a range of 1 m depth from the surface of the water to the bottom (0.3 - 0.14 mg-DO/l). In this eutrophic state, DO increased exponentially during the daytime hours and then decreased during the night. The daily measurement showed an increase in the average DO of 2.31 mg/l (standard deviation of 1.56 mg/l), with average CODinlet fluctuations of 18.79 mg/l (standard deviation of 13.56 mg/l) and average CODoutlet of 14.38 mg/l (standard deviation 2.94 mg/l). Due to additional DO concentration coming from eutrophication during daylight, it was not possible to make a precise assessment of the effectiveness of the MBG aerator.
Seismic Ground Response Analysis of Input Earthquake Motion and Site Amplification Factor at KUET Sonia Akter
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (856.912 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3600

Abstract

Ground motion is the movement of the earth's surface due to explosions or the propagation of seismic waves. In the seismic design process, ground response analysis evaluates the impact of local soil conditions during earthquake shaking. However, it is difficult to determine the dynamic site response of soil deposits in earthquake hazard-prone areas. Structural damage has a great influence on the selection of input ground motion, and in this study, the importance of bedrock motion upon the response of soil is highlighted. The specific site response analysis is assessed through “DEEPSOIl" software with an equivalent linear analysis method. Furthermore, four input motions including Kobe, LomaGilroy, Northridge, and Chi-Chi were selected to obtain normalized response spectra. This study aims to obtain the site amplification of ground motion, peak spectral acceleration (PSA), and maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) based on shear wave velocity from the detailed site-specific analysis of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibor Rahman hall at Khulna University of Engineering & Technology. The maximum shear wave velocity obtained was 205 m/s while the amplification factor varied from 4.01 (Kobe) to 1.8 (Northridge) for rigid bedrock properties. Furthermore, the Kobe earthquake produced the highest (4.3g) PSA and the Northridge earthquake produced the lowest (1.08g) PSA for bedrock, with Vs=205 m/s. The surface PGA values were acquired in the range of 0.254g (Northridge) to 0.722g (Kobe), and the maximum strain values for Kobe earthquakes were in the range of 0.016 to .303. Therefore, the surface acceleration values were very high (>0.12g) for the Kobe earthquake motion.
The Analysis of Beam-Column Joint Reinforced with Cross Bars according to SK SNI T-15-1991-03 on Cyclic Loads Zardan Araby; Samsul Rizal; Abdullah; Mochammad Afifuddin
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum Vol. 8 No. 1 (January 2022)
Publisher : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (573.354 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jcef.3601

Abstract

The primary structural component supporting the other structural loads in a building is the beam-column joint. It is considered a critical area of a building which needs to be accurately designed to ensure energy is dissipated properly during the occurrence of an earthquake. Beam-column joint has the ability to offer a proper structure required to transform cyclic loads in the inelastic region but also has a direct impact on the components connected to it during the occurrence of any failure. This is one of the reasons the beam-column connection needs to be designed carefully. Therefore, this study focused on designing a beam-column joint with reinforcement according to SK SNI T-15-1991 in order to withstand cyclic loads. The test specimen used was observed to have a concrete compressive strength of 19.17 MPa while the dimension of the beam was 120 x 30 x 40 cm and the column was 30 x 30 x 200 cm, having 8Ø13.4 mm bars with 310.03 MPa yield strength (fy) as well as Ø9.8-100 mm stirrup reinforcement with (fy) 374.59 MPa. The test was initiated through the provision of 0.75 mm, 1.5 mm, 3 mm, 6 mm, 12 mm, 24 mm monotonic cyclic loads at the end of the beam up to the moment the specimen cracked. A maximum load of 68.35 kN for the compression and 49.92 kN for the tension was required to attain the cyclic load capacity. The maximum load was attained at 50.98 mm displacement. Furthermore, beam-column with 23.93 mm displacement caused a reduction in capacity. Meanwhile, the load at 24 mm produced the cycle's highest dissipation energy of 13.25 but this can be increased through the addition of stirrups to provide stiffness in the joint. The stiffness value was also observed to have increased after the structural repairs.

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