cover
Contact Name
Annisa Maulidya Chasanah
Contact Email
annisamaulidya.chasanah@gmail.com
Phone
+6281514705015
Journal Mail Official
proust@ui.ac.id
Editorial Address
Building B 1st Floor, Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 16424, Indonesia
Location
Kota depok,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Psychological Research on Urban Society
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 26158582     EISSN : 26203960     DOI : https://doi.org/10.7454/proust
Psychological Research on Urban Society (PRoUSt) welcomes excellent empirical and theoretical contributions to applied research related to the psychology of urban issues. Reviews are also welcome, as are replications of previous research. Articles deal with all fields on urban society, such as urban mental health and well-being, educational and child development in urban society, intergroup relation, acculturation, and identity formation in urban contexts, urban social issues (e.g., poverty, traffic, crime and violence), urban culture, and urban issues on employment and organizational behavior. As these topics are closely related to issues in other disciplines, this journal is open to contributions of an interdisciplinary nature. The readership of PRoUSt Journal consists of academics and practitioners; thus it is suggested that all authors consider these diverse audiences into their writing. Authors of theoretical or highly empirical papers are encouraged to communicate practical implications of their studies, and authors of practice-oriented papers should clearly elaborate the theoretical approach they are using. The topics that include in this journal are: Urban mental health and well-being Education and child development in urban society Intergroup relation, acculturation, and identity formation in urban contexts Urban social issues (ex: poverty, traffic, crime and violence) Urban culture Urban issues on employment and organizational behavior Technology and urban society
Articles 70 Documents
A Two-Dimensional Framework for Psychological Research on Urban Society Analyzing Facebook Use and Subjective Well-Being Cheng, Cecilia
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 1, No. 2
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Abstract

The present research aimed to classify 155 undergraduate students’ Facebook activity using a two- dimensional framework: mode of Facebook communication and motive of Facebook use. The research also aimed to address the less explored issue of Facebook users’ appraisals in addition to their Facebook use. The results indicate that satisfaction with both private and public social communication is positively linked to positive affect, but not to negative affect. Satisfaction with private social communication explained 9% of the variance in positive affect beyond that explained by perceived peer support. The results show the efficacy of the new two-dimensional framework: the Facebook Use and Satisfaction Scale.
Marital Satisfaction Among Dual-Earner Marriage Couples: Commuter versus Single Residences Couples Chrishiannie, Chrishianie; Ginanjar, Adriana Soekandar; Primasari, Indira
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 1, No. 2
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Abstract

This study aimed to compare marital satisfaction in two types of dual-earner couples, namely commuter and single residence marriage couples. Commuter marriage couples are those who live in two separate residences due to their work demands for at least part of the week, whereas single residence couples live in the same residences. A sample of 239 couples filled out the Couple Satisfaction Index (CSI). Factorial ANOVA used to compare marital satisfaction of the two groups. The result showed that commuter marriage couples have higher marital satisfaction compared to single residence dual earner couple. Men in this study reported higher marital satisfaction compared to women.
Social-Demographic Factors Influencing Exclusive Breastfeeding Attitude among Working Nursing Mothers in Urban Areas Of Ibadan, Oyo State Ishola, Ajibola Abdulrahamon; Adekunle, Kenku Akeem; Temitope, Aroyewun Folashade
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 2, No. 2
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Abstract

The study investigates the social-demographic factors influencing exclusive breastfeeding predisposition among employed nursing mothers in the urban area of the Ibadan metropolis. The investigation embraced a cross-sectional survey plan. The targeted populace were mothers who have newborn children between 0-6 months old and living with family members, attending private or public hospitals in Ibadan North LGA, Oyo State. Three hundred (300) urban nursing mothers were sample in the study through purposive sampling technique from among the nursing mothers attending immunization and postnatal clinics in private and public hospitals. The average age was 30.33 years (S.D = 5.8). The average number of pregnancies experienced was 4.56 (S.D = 2.34). 2.1% were single, 76.9% were married, 15.15 separated, and 5.5% were widowed. The average family size was 6.92 ± 2.11. The Nursing mothers responded to questionnaires probing for socio-demographic characteristics and Attitude towards exclusive breast-feeding scale (α = .71). The Objectives of the study were tested Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA) at 0.05 level of significance. Sociodemographic characteristics on attitude towards exclusive breastfeeding behavior (R2 = 0.30, F (9,236) = 9.82, p< .01). Maternal age (β = -.26, t= -3.80) and parity (β = -.31, t= -3.83) predicted nursing mothers on attitude towards exclusive breastfeeding behavior. It was advised that Health care specialists must be alive to their obligations in infant nutritional instruction and health advancement to the mothers of under-fives and the overall general public.
Differences between Bilinguals and Monolinguals in False Memory Production? A Look into the DRM Paradigm Using Contextual Details Riesthuis, Paul; Otgaar, Henry; Wang, Jianqin
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 2, No. 2
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Abstract

This study compared false memory production in Spanish monolinguals and Spanish-Catalan bilinguals. We used an adjusted Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm and presented the participants with eight Spanish DRM lists containing 12 words each, along with figures and colors to manipulate contextual details. Free recall results showed higher true recall levels in bilinguals than in monolinguals. However, we did not find notable false memory differences between the monolinguals and bilinguals. We found no differences in the amount of contextual details added in the true and false recall, indicating that levels of confidence in memories are similar in the two groups. Implications of the findings are discussed.
The Protective Role of Friendship: Crossgroup Friendship Mediates the Effect of Ideological Quest for Significance on Commitment to A Radical Group Milla, Mirra Noor; Hudiyana, Joevarian
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 2, No. 2
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Abstract

On the basis of the Quest for Significance theory, a person’s sense of meaning and personal significance may be obtained from ideological narratives. The more a radical ideology gives a person a sense of meaning, the less likely it is that he or she will engage in interpersonal relations and friendships with out-group members. In this study, we hypothesized that ideological quest for significance would predict commitment to a radical group and that this association would be mediated through cross-group friendship. This research was based on interviews with 241 prisoners at 59 Indonesian prisons, who were serving sentences for terrorism offenses. Mediation analysis found that higher scores on ideological quest for significance significantly predicted lower scores on cross-group friendship, and lower scores on cross-group friendship significantly predicted higher scores on commitment to a radical group. There was a significant direct effect of ideological quest for significance on commitment to a radical group and a significant indirect effect using the bootstrapping method. This suggested that the effect of ideological quest for significance on commitment to a radical group was partially mediated by cross-group friendship.
Sense of Coherence and Driver Stress in Ridesharing Drivers as Moderated by Community Affiliation Grasiaswaty, Novika; Sadida, Nuri; Aliviary, Alexandra
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 3, No. 2
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Abstract

The present research aimed to test whether community involvement moderates the relationship between sense of coherence (SOC) and driver stress among online ridesharing drivers. The study used a quantitative design to collect data via questionnaires. All 112 participants were male and chose online ridesharing as their primary occupation. Participants were assessed using the Work Sense of Coherence Scale and Driver Stress Scale, a subscale of Driving Behavior Inventory. Community involvement was measured with a close-ended question in the demographic section of the questionnaire, with dichotomous options provided (1 = community participation; 0 = no community participation). Collected data were analyzed using JASP to examine the moderating effect. The results of this study showed that community involvement moderates the relationship between SOC and driver stress in online ridesharing drivers.
Effectiveness of Self-Regulated Learning Intervention Program in Forethought Phase of a School Underachiever Matitaputty, Eunike Karina Nadine; Kurniawati, Farida
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 3, No. 2
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Abstract

When someone fails to achieve their potential, it is called underachievement. This phenomenon is predominantly observed for adolescent, particularly during the transition to middle school. This finding is observed because they are obligated to adapt to many internal and external changes. Several studies have confirmed that underachievement is caused by poor self-regulated learning skills. In this study, researchers adapted the Self-Regulation Empowerment Program (SREP) to help middle school student improve their self-regulation skills in learning. This program focuses on increasing the knowledge (cognitive domain) on self-regulated learning at the forethought phase by the means of SREP. This research adopts a single-case experimental design, particularly the A-B design. The analysis is performed by observing how well the participant performs in terms of success indicators, comparison between pretest and posttest scores, and qualitative analysis. Hence, the participant could achieve all success indicators in each session. This intervention program is effective in increasing knowledge on self-regulated learning at the forethought phase in empowerment and goal setting aspects. However, it is not effective in improving the time- management aspect. The procedures in this intervention can be adapted by parent and teachers to help the participant in improving their self-regulated learning ability.
The Relationship Between Stress and Well-being: The Mediating Roles of Students’ Psychological Flexibility and Loneliness During the Coronavirus Pandemic Indra, Gracia Hanna; Radyani, Annisa Mega; Oriza, Imelda Ika Dian
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 4, No. 2
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Abstract

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has greatly impacted people‘s lives, including those of students in higher education, who have experienced drastic changes causing high levels of stress and decreased well-being. The relationship between stress and well-being can be viewed through the lens of psychological flexibility and loneliness. Individuals who experience high stress tend to be psychologically inflexible and have avoidant/maladaptive coping strategies. As a result, they are also vulnerable to loneliness, which ultimately results in decreased in well-being. In this study, of 945 student-participants, 43.28% met the criterion for high loneliness, 21.9% reported high perceived stress, 69.8% reflected high psychological inflexibility, and their mean score for well-being was 54.45. Serial mediation analysis found that psychological flexibility and loneliness partially mediate the relationship between stress and well-being. However, stress can affect well-being directly but also indirectly through psychological inflexibility and loneliness. A high level of stress, with a low level of psychological flexibility, results in a high level of loneliness; hence well-being decreases. Interventions promoting psychological flexibility can help individuals adapt and cope with difficult situations during the pandemic.
Your Gadgets, Stress, and Performance: The Influence of Technostress on Individual Satisfaction and Performance Mustika, Martina Dwi; Handoko, Archifihan Millenadya; Mamoen, Hasna Azzahra; Siahaan, Debora Uliana; Yasyfin, Aunia
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 4, No. 2
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Abstract

The Covid-19 pandemic changes the way employees work, and the use of technologies to support their work is increasing. The aim of this study is to investigate whether technologies can harm employee satisfaction and performance. The hypothesis developed stated, that the technostress creator predicted each individual role performance differently. Job satisfaction also became a mediator, whereas the technostress inhibitor was a moderator of the relationship between the technostress creator and job satisfaction. Two hundred and forty-four online responses were collected from employees in cities during the Covid-19 pandemic. Technostress (Ragu-Nathan et al., 2008), job satisfaction (Hackman & Oldham, 1976), and individual work performance (Griffin et al., 2007) questionnaires were used. The data were analyzed using path analysis. The results suggested that the technostress creator only statistically predicted individual task proficiency (ß = –0.124, SE = 0.060, and p = 0.039) and proactivity (ß = 0.134, SE = 0.060, and p = 0.026). The results found no effects from the mediator or moderator on the prediction of job satisfaction and individual role performances. Therefore, the technostress creator only increased employee stress if the technologies used disrupted their work. However, to some extent, the technostress creator can increase employee innovation when finishing work.
Adolescent Women with Experience of Dating Violence: Self-compassion and Posttraumatic Growth Nabilah, Vikha Alya; Kusristanti, Chandradewi
Psychological Research on Urban Society Vol. 4, No. 2
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Abstract

The most frequently reported cases of violence in Indonesia are against women, and the second highest are dating violence. Similar to other traumatic events, violence leads to negative impacts. Conversely, previous research suggests that trauma survivors might experience positive changes, that is, posttraumatic growth (PTG). In fact, this study aims to determine self-compassion’s contribution to PTG among Indonesian adolescent women who have experienced dating violence; to ensure that all participants had experienced dating violence, we used the trauma and life events (TALE) checklist for screening. Self-compassion helps trauma survivors increase positive thoughts and seek meaning. Therefore, in this study, we argue that self-compassion augments PTG. The study is quantitative, with three questionnaires used: self-compassion scale-short form to measure self-compassion (α = .759), posttraumatic growth inventory-short form to measure posttraumatic growth (α = .643) and trauma and life events checklist as the screening tool to ensure participants had experienced a traumatic event. A simple regression test revealed that among participants (n = 306), self-compassion significantly contributed to PTG by 12% (p = .000, R2 = .120). These findings can be used as a reference in establishing preventive programs or interventions to improve self-compassion and increase awareness about healthy relationships, especially among adolescents.