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Contact Name
Prof. Dr. Ida Rochani Adi, S.U
Contact Email
jurnal.rubikon@gmail.com
Phone
+6281236638111
Journal Mail Official
jurnal.rubikon@gmail.com
Editorial Address
Gedung R. Soegondo FIB UGM, JI. Sagan, Caturtunggal, Depok, Sleman, Yogyakarta 55281
Location
Kab. sleman,
Daerah istimewa yogyakarta
INDONESIA
Rubikon: Journal of Transnational American Studies
ISSN : 25412248     EISSN : 2654413X     DOI : https://doi.org/10.22146/rubikon
Core Subject : Humanities,
RUBIKON, Journal of Transnational American Studies (JTAS) specializes in American Studies especially transnational studies of the U.S. It is also intended to communicate American Studies issues and challenges. This journal warmly welcomes contributors from American Studies scholars, researchers, and those related to the discipline.
Articles 99 Documents
NEGOTIATION OF IDENTITY IN DIASPORIC LITERATURE: A CASE STUDY ON AMY TAN’S THE HUNDRED SECRET SENSES AND LESLIE MARMON SILKO’S CEREMONY Ken Ruri Nindyasmara
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 3, No 1 (2016)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1531.197 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v3i1.47838

Abstract

Negotiation of identity has become an important issue because its never-ending process always relates to conflicts, differences and similarities. Chinese Americans and Native Americans are two distinct diasporic communities amongst other ethnic group in the U.S. As minorities, they experience prejudice, discrimination and exclusion from mainstream American culture and society. This research aims to reveal the negotiation of identity of Chinese Americans and Native Americans which is reflected on their literature. Literature is seen as the record of diasporic experience of both ethnic groups. This research is qualitative conducted under Post-Nationalist American Studies. Post-colonial, hegemony and representation theories are used to help the process of data analysis. The primary data is taken from The Hundred Secret Senses written by Amy Tan and Ceremony written by Leslie Marmon Silko. The secondary data are taken from books, journals, and internet sources. The finding of the research shows that Chinese Americans and Native Americans negotiate their identity by choosing or combining competing values. The construction of identity is done through the reenactment of ethnic root and the adaptation to mainstream American cultural values. Sense of belongingness, history and socio-cultural background become the determining factors of identity negotiation. In brief, they construct hybrid identity to survive and to counter American hegemony. Compared to Native Americans, Chinese Americans are more blending to mainstream American culture. However, both novels depict their hybrid identity. Keywords: identity negotiation, diasporic literature, diaspora communities, hegemony, hybrid identity
FIGHTING FOR WOMEN EXISTENCE IN POPULAR ESPIONAGE MOVIES SALT (2010) AND ZERO DARK THIRTY (2012) Benita Amalina
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 3, No 1 (2016)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1565.455 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v3i1.47824

Abstract

American spy movies have been considered one of the most profitable genre in Hollywood. These spy movies frequently create an assumption that this genre is exclusively masculine, as women have been made oblivious and restricted to either supporting roles or non-spy roles. In 2010 and 2012, portrayal of women in spy movies was finally changed after the release of Salt and Zero Dark Thirty, in which women became the leading spy protagonists. Through the post-nationalist American Studies perspective, this study discusses the importance of both movies in reinventing women’s identity representation in a masculine genre in response to the evolving American society. Keywords: American women, hegemony, representation, Hollywood, movies, popular culture
CONCEPTUALIZING FRIENDSHIP THROUGH AMERICAN GAY TELEVISION SERIES IN 2000S Rudy Rudy
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.842 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v2i2.34260

Abstract

Gay culture has been one of the most phenomenal issues in the world, particularly in the United States. As this culture has become pro and contra over American regarding their point of view, ethically or unethically, thus, it has been spread all over the world through media, particularly television, which makes it unique and essential to observe through the television series, gay characters appear with certain features attached to them. This study concentrates on the depiction of gay shown through American gay television series in 2000s. As gay culture is strongly connected to the collectivity, the friendship among minority groups like gay people has become fascinating to identify. By focusing on how and why the friendship is portrayed through the gay television series, this study incorporates semiotic approach to identify the friendship among gay shown by the American gay television series in 2000s. The observation of the gay television series have revealed that friendship among gay people plays a significant role in gay culture. The research findings show that the depiction of friendship through the gay TV series symbolizes similar values and vision shared among gay people in order to reach solidarity. Additionally, strong friendship as a binding value is always the feature shown by oppressed minority groups in a society.Keywords: Gay, Television Series, 2000s, Friendship, America Culture
CAPITALISM AND SOCIALISM AS IDEOLOGICAL CONSTRUCTIONS IN AMERICAN DYSTOPIAN NOVELS Anna Sriastuti; Ida Rochani Adi; Muh. Arif Rokhman
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (510.581 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69733

Abstract

Literature reflects the history of people's lives, which includes lifestyle, culture, language, desires, and important events in people's lives. Dystopia novels cannot be separated from discussions about authoritarian government, restraints on people's freedom, criticism of the development of technology and information, exploitation and the class system, and the arbitrariness of the rulers. Despite telling a bad world, Dystopian novels proved popular in America, a country that promised freedom, equality, and freedom to its citizens. The possibility of different realities captured by American popular novelists who differ from their imaginations gave birth to dystopian novels that are popular in American society. Thus, this study is important to analyse Capitalism and Socialism as ideological constructions in American dystopian novels through Fahrenheit 451, The Handmaid’s Tale, Uglies, and The Hunger Games. This research will formulate an understanding of whether or not American dystopian novels confirm or negate the ideology of Capitalism and the ideology of Socialism.
FASHION AND COMMODIFICATION: AN ANALYSIS ON THE GLOBAL PHENOMENON OF SUPREME Winda Eka Pahla Ayuningtyas; Galant Nanta Adhitya
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1063.716 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69692

Abstract

Globalization is the global information spread and people interconnectivity. It is driven by technological developments in transportation and communication, removing cultural boundaries among nations. Cultural differences are increasingly less tangible and visible in all cultural products, including in fashion. Due to globalization, fashion brands that originate in a certain country can open stores across multiple continents. The invention of the Internet further widens their accessibility by consumers in any part of the world. However, globalization also brings an affordability gap between the upper and the lower classes. Nonetheless, fashion brands can also take advantage of this economic difference in appealing to their consumers. One of those brands is Supreme. Founded in 1994, it became the most sought-after hypebeast brand among street-fashion enthusiasts worldwide. How do they do it in less than 30 years is interesting to analyze. To answer this objective, this article is conducted from the cultural studies standpoint and the case study method. There are three formulas of positioning it adopts in order to grow globally: (1) the commodification African-American community, (2) the use of celebrity endorsement, and (3) the hype of limited-edition releases. Supreme sells oversized streetwear, heavily influenced by Hip-hop culture, a music genre rooted in the lives of African Americans. The brand makes use of celebrities, especially rappers, to endorse its clothes and accessories. It also continually makes headlines by releasing limited-edition products as well as collaborating with well-known figures and brands.
RETHINKING THE ‘TRUTH’ OF IDENTITY: DISSECTING QUEERNESS AND EMO SUBCULTURE IN NETFLIX’S THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY Pradipta Michella Wibrinda
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (662.562 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69691

Abstract

Over the years, the presence of LGBTQ+ community in the media has gone through noticeable change. It is a challenge for online streaming services like Netflix to represent as many communities and subcultures as they can, because accessibility comes with more diverse audience. While many LGBTQ+ characters have been put in the spotlight, those who identify beyond binaries are still arguably underrepresented, especially the ones that belong to socially degraded subculture like emo. The Umbrella Academy is a TV show rooted in emo subculture that feature LGBTQ+ superhero characters, Klaus Hargreeves and Vanya Hargreeves, who do not fully associate with the label “gay”, “lesbian”, or “bisexual”. This study employs what Judith Butler asserts, that gender expressions and practices of desire go beyond binaries, to see how emo subculture engages queerness as rejection to rigid classification of gender identities and sexual practices, as well as a tool to oppose conservatism, especially of previous generations. The discussion reveals that contrary to the popular belief that perceives emo as the culture of straight middle-class white boys, the show perceives emo subculture through the characters’ rejection to absolute identification. The characters show rejection through clothing, behavior, mannerism, and verbal statements. The characters also show opposition to conservatism, which include traditional gender roles, traditional superhero narratives, masculine-feminine polarity, and the ‘truth’ of identity.
MORE THAN A HOUSE: A GENDER ANALYSIS OF LAHSA’S THE VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT (VAWA) HOUSING POLICY Listiyanti Jaya Arum; Anindya Firda Khairunnisa
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (481.508 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69690

Abstract

Homelessness is a chronic problem worldwide, including in the United States. The country’s biggest homeless population occupies major cities like New York and Los Angeles. The fight against homelessness in L.A. has been going on for years, with the homeless population flooding places like Venice Beach, Echo Park, Hollywood, and its most famous homeless encampment, Skid Row. One of the groups constantly vulnerable to the threat of homelessness are women, and the intersection between women's homelessness and domestic violence remains to be a challenging subject. Enriching previous scholarship, this paper critically analyzes housing programs targeting female domestic violence survivors in Los Angeles. In order to get an in-depth examination, the focus is directed to the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Housing Policy managed by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA). The paper employs gender theory to examine the program’s shortcomings. Using Jeff Hearn’s conception of the ‘public men,’ this paper proposes that the program’s limitations stem from the prevailing patriarchy, which cultivates from home and extends to public policy through the domination of men. Furthermore, the policy is insufficient in combatting women's homelessness due to the absence of programs such as trauma centers, financial security & education program, and childcare unit that are vital to address the unique experience of domestic violence survivors. Thus, evaluation of the housing policy is immediately needed to overcome the problem of homelessness due to domestic violence.
FEMSLASH FANFICTION AND LESBIANISM: EFFORTS TO EMPOWER AND EXPRESS ASIAN AMERICAN WOMAN SEXUALITY Tyas Willy Kartika; Maria Elfrieda C.S.T
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (556.533 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69689

Abstract

The existence of fan fiction nowadays shows more progressive development especially in this digital era when people does not only use internet for communicating and socializing across time and space but they also show their creativity, one of them is by writing a fan fiction. By writing fan fiction in online platforms, people get the opportunity to express their interests and their identities. This opportunity is also obtained by minority groups such as LGBTQ+ where they can express their identity through fan fiction. LGBTQ+ community utilizes online platform as the tool that brings benefit for them. In this case, writing fan fiction in online platforms allows people to create the preferable representation of minority groups and empower them as the part of LGBTQ+ community. This phenomenon can be seen through a website named Asianfanfics.com which shows an increasing number of fan fictions especially the ones with lesbian related tags such as girl x girl, lesbian, and femslash. Particularly, through the femslash subgenre, people use fan fiction to question the heteronormativity. Regarding to this phenomenon, an interview was conducted by choosing three Asian American fan fiction writers from Asianfanfics.com as the interviewees. Furthermore, by using gender theory and intersectionality, this article focuses on how fan fiction becomes a safe space to express their sexual identities and how lesbian relationship is viewed by Asian families.
RACISM TOWARDS AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY AS REFLECTED IN MAYA ANGELOU’S I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS: BLACK AESTHETIC CRITICISM Gisa Maya Saputri
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 2 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (614.581 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i2.69687

Abstract

The study of the African American community always circulates among the issues of race, racism, discrimination, slavery, and oppression. All these issues become the grand themes of African American literature. These literary works could be studied and covered under the scope of Black Aesthetic criticism. One of the prominent works of African American literature is an autobiography of Maya Angelou entitled I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This autobiography portrays Angelou’s childhood experiences which brings up the issues of race, racism, and oppression. This paper aims to analyze the kinds of racism experienced by the African American community and their struggle against it as depicted in the book. To provide a thorough discussion of the matter, critical race theory was employed as the method of analysis. The result is drawn based on the basic tenets of critical race theory proposed by Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic (2001); everyday racism, interest convergence, the social construction of race, differential realization, intersectionality, and voice of Color. The findings show the struggle of African American community against racism which are expressed through the act of ignorance, promoting intelligence, communal efforts, resistance, promoting social movement, and stepping forward to voice their experience through African American literature.
DISNEY PRINCESS SEQUELS IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF SECOND WAVE FEMINISM IN AMERICA Astrinda N. Iswalono; Listiyanti Jaya Arum
Rubikon : Journal of Transnational American Studies Vol 8, No 1 (2021)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (388.231 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rubikon.v8i1.65485

Abstract

Disney Animation Production, one of the media manifesting American sociology phenomena, discovered a breakthrough by depicting Princess movies. Starting with the appearance of Snow White (1937), followed by Cinderella (1950) and other sequels of Princess movies, Disney reflected one important progress of American history. The development of the sequels was estimated to be under the appeal of the Second Wave Feminism movement. Hypothesizing the change was within American society, a gender study by Nancy Hewitt would direct the observation of the study. The First Period Princesses (1937-1959) reflected the idea of the American Golden Age, also where the recognition of the role of women in wider society began. Meanwhile, the Second Period (1989-2009) claimed the social acceptance of public access by glorifying unique characters from women. The Princesses in the Third Period (2009-2014) were able to attest their own power in order to broaden the horizon of gender equality and equity. 

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