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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 1,955 Documents
Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease Wiwit Rahmawati; Heru Muryawan; Farah Prabowo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (315.207 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi53.4.2013.193-9

Abstract

Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death inchildren. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made byclinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonographyor other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney diseaseis needed for education and management of the disease.Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality inchildren with chronic kidney disease .Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidneydiseases who were inpatients at Dr. Kariadi Hospital from January2008 to June 2011. Data were taken from medical records. Chronickidney disease was confirmed by clinical manifestations, laboratoryfindings, and radiologic imaging. Renal ultrasound findings weredetermined by the radiologist responsible at that time. Resultswere presented as ft:equency distributions.Results Of 37 chronic kidney disease cases, 27 were males and 10were females. Subjects' most common complaints were dyspnea (7out of 3 7) and edema (30 out of 3 7) . Renal ultrasound imaging ofsubjects with chronic kidney disease yielded the following findings:reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (30 out of 3 7), bilateralechogenic kidneys (21 out of 3 7), reduced renal cortex thickness(4 out of 37) and small-sized kidneys (4 out of 37) . Eight of the37 children died. These 8 subjects had the following radiologicimaging findin gs: both kidneys appeared small in size (4 out ofS),reduced 'renal cortex' thickness (4 out of 8), echogenic kidneys(6 out of 8), and reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (8out of8).Conclusion Renal ultrasound imaging of pediatric subjects withchronic kidney disease revealed findings of reduced corticomedullarydifferentiation, bilateral echogenic kidneys, reducedrenal cortex thickness, and small kidneys bilaterally.
Lactose malabsorption based on breath hydrogen test in children with recurrent abdominal pain Elizabeth Yohmi; Aswitha D Boediarso; Sri Rezeki S Hadinegoro
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (831.356 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.6.2004.215-21

Abstract

Background Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is common amongschool-age children. Previous studies found that lactose malab-sorption has an important role in RAP in children. Up to date, dataon the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in children with RAPin Indonesia has not been available.Objective To elicit the prevalence of RAP and lactose malabsorption inchildren with RAP, and to determine associated foods that cause RAPin children with and without lactose malabsorption, the frequency oflactose intolerance during breath hydrogen test (BHT), and also theonset and duration of the symptoms after a lactose load.Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted on juniorhigh school students who suffered from recurrent abdominal pain.Results Of 1054 students screened, 157 (14.9%) fulfilled the Apley’scriteria for RAP. Of 157, 85 children were enrolled and underwentBHT. Fifty five of them (65%) were girls. Lactose malabsorptionwas found in 68 (80%) subjects. Milk and yogurt were the mostfrequent products that cause symptoms of RAP in our subjectswho mostly (80%) were malabsorber. Lactose intolerance duringBHT was found in 69 (81%) children. Symptoms appeared in 30minutes after lactose ingestion, and the most frequent symptomwas abdominal pain (44%). Lactose intolerance symptoms disap-peared in about 15 hours.Conclusions The prevalence of RAP in children aged 12-14 yearswas 14.9%. The prevalence of lactose malabsorption in childrenwith RAP was 80%. Milk and yogurt were the most frequent productsthat cause symptoms of RAP in our subjects who mostly weremalabsorbers. The frequency of lactose intolerance during BHTwas 81%, and the symptoms lasted within approximately 15 hours
Screening urinalysis for proteinuria in school children Partini P. Trihono; Ina S. Timan; Supriyadi Bektiwibowo; Diana Aulia; Lukman Edwar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.231-3

Abstract

Although asymptomatic proteinuria in children is uncommon, long-term follow-up of children who have persistent proteinuria reveals that they face risks to have significant glomerular changes followed by decreasing kidney function. Since 1970’s urine screening program for asymptomatic hematuria and proteinuria in schoolchildren has been conducted regularly in some countries. So far such program has never been implemented in Jakarta. As a part of The Community Health Program of the Medical School, University of Indonesia, this epidemiologic study aimed especially to look at the urine abnormalities among schoolchildren. The target population was children in grades III, IV and V of 4 elementary schools in Eastern Jakarta. Four hundred and forty nine children (217 boys and 232 girls) were enrolled in this study, held during school time in August 1999. Their mean age was 9.35 (SD 1.2) years. Data collected were history of illness, physical examination, and complete urinalysis using a dipstick method. Proteinuria was found in 30 (6.8%) children, which in repeated urinalyses were determined as orthostatic in 2 (0.4%), transient in 20 (4.5%), and persistent proteinuria in 6 (1.4%) children. Three out of 6 children with persistent proteinuria also had hematuria. One child with persistent proteinuria was considered as having urinary tract infection. We conclude that the incidence of asymptomatic proteinuria in schoolchildren is not high, but because of significant risks that they face, a long-term follow up of them is indicated.
Neurobrucellosis in Children Musa Kazim Caglar; Sabiha Aysun
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January - February 1989
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi29.1-2.1989.28-32

Abstract

Although the neurological symptoms in brucellosis are frequent, nervous system involvement is uncommon. In addition, blood and cerebrospinal fluid may not show growth of Brucella in culture. For these reasons brucellosis may not be considered hence correct diagnosis of the disease may be delayed. We have presented three cases of leptomeningitis due to brucellosis where diagnosis was delayed one to two months and was correctly made in two cases only after bone marrow aspiration culture.
Identification of risk factors for recurrent febrile convulsion Nadirah Rasyid Ridha; P. Nara; Hadia Angriani; Dasril Daud
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (98.415 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.2.2009.87-9

Abstract

Background Febrile convulsion (FC) occurs in about 2 to 4percent of all children, approximately one third of whom willthen develop recurrent febrile convulsion (RFC). Risk factorsfor RFC are family history of convulsions, an age of less than 18months, a relatively lower temperature and shorter duration offever preceeding the first FC.Objective The aim of the study was to determine the risk factorsfor RFC.Methods One hundred children aged 6 months to 5 years withFC or RFC were included in this case-controlled study, which wascarried out from July 2006 to June 2007. Data on the children'sfirst FC were collected from medical records and the family historywas taken directly from the parents.Results Fifty children with RFC and 50 children withoutrecurrence were included in this study. An age of less than 18months (P< 0.0001, COR= 71.37), a family history of FC(P< 0.0001, COR= 6.00), and a fever duration ofless than 12hours preceding the first FC (P< 0.0001, COR = 4.96) wereassociated with a risk of recurrence. A relatively lower degree oftemperature at first febrile convulsion did not increase the riskfor RFC (P = 1.21). Multivariate logistic regression showed thatyounger age and shorter duration of fever preceding the first FCwere associated with RFC.Conclusion Younger age and shorter duration of fever precedingthe first FC are associated with an increased risk ofRFC.
Diabetic ketoacidosis in children: an 11-year retrospective in Surabaya, Indonesia Nur Rochmah; Muhammad Faizi; Netty Harjantien
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (83.27 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.1.2015.40-3

Abstract

Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complication of type I diabetic mellitus (TIDM). Early recognition and prompt treatment can reduce mortality. Objective To evaluate the profiles of patients with diabetic ketoasidosis in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. Methods Retrospective medical records of patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with DKA in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia from January 2002 to June 2013 were reviewed. The data collected included clinical parameters, laboratory and imaging results, predisposing factors, complications and outcomes. Results During an 11 years period, there were 58 cases of DKA in children with T1DM. Eighteen subjects (31%) were boys. The severity of DKA was classified as follows: mild 13 (22.4%), moderate 23 (39.7%), and severe DKA 22 (37.9%). Recurrent DKA was diagnosed in 24 (41.4%) patients. Common clinical profiles recorded were dehydration 46 (79.3%), malaise 37 (63.8%), decreased consciousness 35 (60.3%), dyspnea 27 (46.6%), vomiting 26 (44.8%), fever 25 (43.1%), seizure 13 (22.4%), and decreased body weight 9 (15.5%). Laboratory results observed were as folllows: hyponatremia 19 (32.8%), hyperkalemia 12 (20.7%) and acute renal failure 3 (5.2%). Head CT scans showed that 2 (3.4%) patients suffered from cerebral edema. Infections, as triggers of DKA, were found in 12 (20.6%) patients: 4 caries and periodontitis, 3 urinary tract infections, 2 acute diarrhea, 2 acute pharyngitis, and 1 otitis externa. Four out of 24 patients with recurrent DKA failed to take their insulin dose prior to DKA. The average of length of patient stay in the PICU was 3.26 (SD 3.50) days. No patients died during the study. Conclusion Dehydration is the most common clinical profile of DKA in our study. More than half of the patients suffer from moderate to severe DKA.
Clinical manifestations of acute asthma in children at the Department of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Kadek Ayu Lestari; Imam Budiman; Sudigdo Sastroasmoro
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (261.755 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.4.2003.132-5

Abstract

Background Acute asthma is an asthma attack or worsening ofasthma manifestation and pulmonary function. Severe asthma at-tack might be prevented by early recognition of the attack and ap-propriate therapy. Clinical manifestations of asthma in children varywidely, so does the assessment of the attack that is often not accu-rately defined by doctors. This leads to delayed and inadequatetreatment of the attack.Objective This study aimed to know the clinical manifestationsof acute asthma in children at the Department of Child Health, Medi-cal School University of Indonesia/Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospi-tal.Methods This was a descriptive, cross sectional study, conductedat the emergency room (ER), the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpa-tient Clinic, and the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic. Subjects were asth-matics who were having attack and aged 2-18 year-old. Data ofage, sex, pulse rate, respiratory rate, duration of attack, expiratory,and inspiratory effort signs were obtained by history and physicalexamination followed by the assessment of attack severity.Results Subjects consisted of 92 children, mostly obtained fromthe ER (40%), with male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and average ageof 5.8 years old. Most of the subjects had mild attack (83%) andduration of attack of less than 24 hours (56%). Most subjects (70%)only had signs of increased expiratory effort, in which all of themhad mild attack. The rest of the subjects showed the combinationof inspiratory and expiratory efforts; 12 patients with mild attack,15 with moderate attack, and 1 with severe attack.Conclusion Patients who only showed expiratory effort usuallyhad mild attack. Patients showing expiratory and inspiratory ef-forts usually had mild or moderate attack. Treatment should betailored to the degree of attack
Anemia in children with chronic renal failure Special attention erythrocyte indices and iron deficiency anemia Adi Suryanto B; Partini P Trihono; Agus Firmansyah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.4.2006.154-8

Abstract

Background Anemia in chronic renal failure (CRF) has beenproved to influence the quality of life, increasing morbidity andmortality. Early diagnosis and prompt treatments of anemia aremandatory to manage CRF appopriately. So far data of anemia inCRF in Indonesia is limited.Objective To find out the profile of anemia in children with CRF atCipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH), Jakarta, with special atten-tion in erythrocyte indices and iron deficiency anemia.Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out onpatients with CRF and anemia in CMH since October 2003 to April2004.Results There were 20 CRF patients, aged between 1 year 3 month-15 year old, mostly were above 10 year old, 11 patients were malesand 9 were females. The most frequent etiologies were urinarytract infection (UTI) in 10 cases and nephrotic syndrome in 6 cases.Of those 20 patients, 14 suffered from anemia with erythrocyteindices, normochrome normocytic in 9 patients and hypochromemicrocytic in 5 patients. Of 14 anemic patients only 1 patient suf-fered from iron deficiency anemia of less than 10 mg/l and transferinsaturation of less than 12%. Based on serum iron (SI) concentra-tion only, 7 patients were diagnosed as having iron deficiency ane-mia.Conclusion Most patients with chronic renal failure havenormochrome normocytic anemia. Hypochromic microcytic irondeficiency anemia is scarcely found in this group of patients.
Underfive KMS utilizationin Marunda North Jakarta Titi Sunarwati Sularyo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January - February 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi39.1-2.1999.8-13

Abstract

A prospective study was carried out on 102 underfives by home visits in Marunda, North Jakarta to obtain data on identification, and the underfive mortality in the family. The KMSs were reviewed in terms of, among others, its utilization and the immunization state. It revealed that the KMSs were over distributed (in 70.6% of children), but underutilized (83.3%), in a sense that only in 16.7% were the growth curves (weight curve) graphically plotted on the growth charts, and only in 21.6% were the KMS kept by the child/family. A proper utilization of the KMS was considered crucial as it was significantly related to improvement of the underfive immunization coverage (p<O.05) and very significantly related (p<0.01) to reduction in underfive mortality.
A Child with severe Nephrolithiasis and Nephrocalcinosis Bahrun D.; Alatas H.; I. G. N. Wila Wirya; Himawan S.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January - February 1982
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi22.1-2.1982.32-42

Abstract

A case of severe nephrolithiasis with nephrocalcinosis ill a six years old child has been reported.The diagnosis of nephroNthiasis was made based on the radiological examination and laboratory findings.The cause of hypercalciuria in this case was still obscure. Necropsy finding revealed a terminal renal failure with severe nephrocalcinosis.The cause of terminal renal failure in this case was probably multiple renal stones due to prolonged hyperca!ciuria and severe nephrocalcinosis, complicated by chronic renal infection.

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