cover
Contact Name
Agus Susanto
Contact Email
agus.susanto0508@unsoed.ac.id
Phone
+6285642805008
Journal Mail Official
animalproduction@unsoed.ac.id
Editorial Address
R 108 Fakultas Peternakan Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Jl. dr. Soeparno Utara No 60, Grendeng, Purwokerto Utara 53123 phone (0281) 638792 email: redaksijap@gmail.com - animalproduction@unsoed.ac.id
Location
Kab. banyumas,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Animal Production
Animal Production is a peer-reviewed journal published by the Faculty of Animal Science, Jenderal Soedirman University in association with the Animal Scientist Society of Indonesia. The journal was established in 1999 and available online since May 4, 2011. Animal Production was initially published twice a year, then three times a year starting in 2005. The journal coverage focused on small scale livestock farming and technologies which includes the recent science development in animal production, including all aspects of nutrition, breeding, reproduction, post-harvest processing and socio-economics. All articles are available online. Full text available in pdf format and can be downloaded for free. Starting Vol 22 No 1 the papers have been and will be published in our new website (http://animalproduction.id), as the continuation of our previous but still active website (http://animalproduction.net).
Articles 574 Documents
The Effect of Addition Fermented Dairy-Waste Water Sludge By Aspergillus Niger in Ration on Growth Performance and The Caecal Microbial of Broiler Marlina, Eulis Tanti; Balia, Roostita Lobo Lobo; Lukman, Denny Widaya
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (449.067 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.1.690

Abstract

Dairy Wastewater Sludge (DWS) is sediment from milk processing. Nutritional content of DWS can be used as feed ingredients. The effects of nutrition in DWS are tested on the growth of broiler as well as its specific impact on the development of microflora on broiler digestion. The research methods used experimental design. Tapioca by-product (onggok) is used as DWS binder while Aspergillus niger fermentation is applied to improve nutritional content. The rate of addition fermented DWS in the ration was evaluated through measuring weight gain for 35 days and microflora quality in the cecum by counting the number of non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacteria in the cecum at the end of the research period. The research data were analyzed by ANOVA with Duncan's multiple range test. The results showed that the addition of 20% fermented DWS in rations resulted in the highest body weight gain and could suppress the growth of pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., E. coli, and Enterobacteriaceae) in caecal. The ratio of non pathogenic and pathogenic bacteria increased proportional to the addition of fermented DWS levels in the ration.   Different caecum weight of broiler with different fermented DWS levels was a reprentation of microorganism activity in caecum.  This condition can illustrate the good health status of livestock so as to optimize the growth of broiler.
The Characteristics and Quality of Egg from Commercial Laying Hens Fed with Garlic (Allium Sativum) Supplemented Ration Leke, Jein Rinny; Wantasen, Erwin; Sompie, Florencia; Elly, Femy Hadidjah; Siahan, Ratna
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (32.892 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.746

Abstract

The research aimed to determine the characteristics and quality of egg of commercial laying hens fed ration supplemented with garlic (Allium sativum) powder. The research used Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with five treatments and four replicates (5 hens each) for a total of 100 brown laying hens strain MB 402. Garlic powder contained 24.62% crude protein, 38.81% fat, and 1.74% crude fiber. The treatments of garlic powder ration were 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8%. The treatments performed were dietary, with R0 = 100% based diet (BD); R1= 98% based diet (BD) + 2% garlic meal (GM); R2= 96% based diet (BD) + 4% GM, R3 = 94% based diet (BD) + 6% GM, R4 = 92% based diet (BD) + 8% GM. The study was conducted during eight (8) weeks. Collected data were quality, weight, shell weight, albumen weight and shell thickness of eggs. Data was analyzed with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and continued with Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT). The results showed that 8% garlic powder ration increased weight and albumen weight of eggs. There were no significant effect of treatments in yolk weight, shell weight and shell thickness of eggs. Garlic powder supplementation on laying hen ration affected egg weight and albumen weight. The addition of garlic powder on laying hen ration of up to 4% increased egg weight. Albumen weight increased until garlic powder supplementation of up to 8%. It is recommended the use of 8% garlic powder supplementation on lying hen ration without negative effects on egg quality.
The Internal Organs Weight of 6-Weeks Old Native Chickens after Supplement Addition With L-threonine and L-tryptophan in the Feed Lisnahan, Charles Venirius; Nahak, Oktavianus Rafael
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (299.892 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.736

Abstract

The aim of this experiment was to identify the internal organs weight of 6-weeks old native chickens after treatment feed with l-threonine and l-tryptophan supplement. This experimental research used 128 native chickens aged one-week-old in a Completely Randomized Design with four treatments and four replications. The dietary treatments were T0 (control feed), T1 (T0 + 0.35% l-threonine + 0.10% l-tryptophan), T2 (T0 + 0.68% l-threonine + 0.17% l-tryptophan), and T3 (T0 + 1.00% l-threonine + 0.25% l-tryptophan). The variables measured included body weight, liver weight, pancreas weight, gizzard weight, and intestinal length. Statistical analysis showed that l-threonine and l-tryptophan significantly affected body weight, liver weight, pancreas weight, gizzard weight and intestinal length. Supplementing 1.00% l-threonine and 0.25% l- tryptophan to feed contributed to the highest body weight and internal organs weight of native chickens.
Physiological Response and Haematological Profile of Reproductive Ewe Consuming Diet Supplemented with Black Tea Extract and Sunflower Seed Oil Diapari, Didid; Hermana, Widya; Prameswari, Febrina; Jayanegara, Anuraga
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 19, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (653.578 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2017.19.3.622

Abstract

This study was aimed to examine the effect of black tea extract addition in diet containing 4% and 6% sunflower oil on ewe physiological responses and blood profiles from late pregnancy until early lactation. This study was designed using a 2×2 factorial completely randomized design with 5 replications on 20 late-pregnant ewes. The first factor was two levels of sunflower seed oil (4% and 6%) and the second factor was the levels of black tea extract addition (0 ppm and 500 ppm). Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan’s multiple range test. Results showed that supplementation of sunflower seed oil and black tea extract had no effect on physiological responses and blood profiles of ewe during late pregnancy until early lactation except for erythrocyte numbers. Erythrocyte numbers were higher on 6% sunflower seed oil supplementation than that of 4% (P<0.05). In conclusion, addition of black tea extract in diets containing 4% and 6% sunflower seed oil limitedly affect physiological responses and blood profiles of ewe.
Study of Local Herb Potency as Rumen Modifier: Red Ginger (Zingiber Officinale Var. Rubrum) Addition Effect on In Vitro Ruminal Nutrient Digestibility Kurniawati, Asih; Yusiati, Lies Mira; Widodo, Widodo; Artama, Wayan Tunas
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (430.093 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.1.713

Abstract

Red ginger is herb that commonly used as part of traditional medicine due to its essential oil content. Some essential oil have proven as rumen fermentation modifier. Addition of red ginger in ruminant diet was studied using in vitro gas production technique to evaluate its effect on nutrient digestibility. Red ginger meal was added to meet essential oil level in fermentation medium of 0 mg/l as control, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/l. The diet consisted of Penisetum hybride, rice bran, wheat pollard in ratio 60:20:20 DM basis. Feed fermentation was incubated for 24 h at 39°C. At the end of incubation data of gas production volume was taken, and residual feed were collected for further nutrient analysis to calculate the digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP) and crude fiber (CF). Variance analysis was used to analysis collected data, followed by DMRT analysis.  Addition of red ginger increase total volume of gas production at level 50 mg/L and above. DM and OM digestibility did not affected by red ginger addition whereas CP digestibility were significantly decreased start at level 50 mg/l. In contrast, CF digestibility of treatment level of 50 mg/l significantly higher than control. In conclusion, addition of red ginger correspond to level essential oil of 50 to 100 mg/l improve ruminal nutrient fermentation.
Socio Demographic Factors Influencing the Income of Native Chicken Farming in Rural Area of Ciamis Regency Setiana, Lucie; Sugiarto, Mochamad; Djatmiko, Oentoeng Edy
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (301.245 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.757

Abstract

Sentul chicken is one of indigenous poultries maintained by most people in Ciamis Regency, West Java Province. This study aimed at determining the influence of socio demographic factors on the income generated from Sentul chicken farming in Ciamis Regency. A survey method was conducted to the members of seven farmer groups institutionally assisted by the Ciamis Regency Government Unit. The descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used to describe the profile of respondents and to analyze the influence of socio demographic factors on the income generated from Sentul chicken farming. The results showed that the farmers’ length of education was 11.8 years with 5.8 years experience raising the Sentul chicken while the farm size was averagely 9 heads of chicken. The Sentul chicken farmmaintained in 70 days with semi-intensive production system has generated income ranging from IDR 756,000 to IDR 19,900,000. Farming experience and farm size significantly influenced the income generated from Sentul chicken farming. Increase the farming experience of Sentul chicken farmers and enlarging Sentul chicken farm size with semi-intensive production system may improve the income generated from Sentul chicken farming in Ciamis Regency.
The Influence of Breed and Type of Extender on the Quality of Bull Semen Sukirman, Iman; Sukmawati, Eros; Rasad, Siti Darojah; Solihati, Nurcholidah
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (47.07 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.641

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the influence of breed and type of extenders on frozen semen quality of cows at BIB Lembang. The experimental study was conducted in a Factorial Randomized Block Design (RBD) with two factors. The first factor was four cow breeds, i.e. Ongole Cross (PO), Brahman (BR), Simmental (SM) and Limousin (LM), and the second factor was two types of extender, i.e. Skim-Egg Yolk (SKT) and AndroMed® (AND), all repeated four times. The observed variables were percentage of spermatozoa motility and intact plasma membrane (IPM). All data obtained were analyzed using a general linear model (IBM SPSS ver. 23). The results demonstrated an interaction between breed and the type of diluent to motility. Breeds showed significantly different motility but non-significantly different intact plasma membrane (MPU) of semen. The type of diluent did not significantly affect motility and intact plasma membrane (MPU) of the frozen semen. The effect of the breed on BR motility was lower and significantly different from PO, LM and SM. The types of diluent did not significantly affect motility, MPU. The results showed that SKT was lower than AND, it was indicative effect of breed on intact plasma membrane (MPU) PO was lower than BR, LM and SM and the effect of the type of diluent on whole plasma membrane (MPU) AND is lower than SKT. It can be concluded that breed influences the motility of semen. The lowest motility reduction in frozen semen is Brahman cattle by using skim-egg yolk extender.
Influence of Different Vegetable Oils on In Vitro Ruminal Fermentability and Nutrient Digestibility in Ettawah Crossbred Goat Muktiani, Anis; Arifah, Nurul; Widiyanto, Widiyanto
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (439.271 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.1.689

Abstract

This research was aimed to determine the effect of supplementation of vegetable oil (corn oil, palm oil and kapok seed oil) on in vitro ruminal fermentability and nutrient digestibility. Experiment design used was Randomized Block Design with four treatments and four replication based on rumen fluid sampling time. The four treatments namely R0 = feed without oil supplementation; R1 = R0 + 5% corn oil; R2 = R0 + 5% palm oil; and R3 = R0 + 5% kapok seed oil. The result showed that supplementation of 5% vegetable oil did not affect (P>0,05) the rumen pH, A/P ratio, and efficiency of energy conversion. The total VFA, acetate, propionate, butyrate, methane and NH3 was higher (P<0,05) in supplementation of 5% vegetable oil than he control. The population of protozoa, microbial protein, in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD), organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), and crude fiber digestibility (IVCFD) was lower (P<0,05) in supplementation of 5% compared to the control. Population of protozoa decreased until 58,76% for R1; 66,89% for R2; and 43,33% for R3. It can be concluded that supplementation of 5% vegetable oil decreased the population of protozoa, increased the production of VFA and NH3. Supplementation of 5% kapok seed oil resulting the highest of total VFA, acetate, propionate, butyrate and NH3 among other treatments.
Content of Prussic Acid and Production of Sorghum Brown Midrib by Adding Urea Fertilizer and Extending Harvesting Time Umami, Nafiatul; Isnaini, Nofi; Suhartanto, Bambang
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (373.011 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.562

Abstract

Abstract. The aimed of this study to determine the effect of adding urea fertilizer (0, 50, and 100 kg/ha) and harvesting time (50, 80 and days) on prussic acid content and production of the brown midrib (BMR) sorghum plants. This study design was completely randomized factorial 3 x 3. The variables measured were prussic acid content, fresh yield, the production of dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM). The results showed that content of prussic acid increased and highly significant with the addition of urea. The fresh yield of BMR sorghum is highest in the fertilization of 50 kg/ha and at the harvesting time 80 days. The highest DM production at fertilization 0 kg/ha and  harvesting time 110 day. OM production of the highest is the addition of fertilizer 0 kg/ ha and at the harvesting time on 80 days. From the results of this study concluded that on harvesting time 80 day sorghum  BMR have produces optimum and addition of urea to a level of 100 kg/ha did not affect the content of prussic acid, fresh yield, DM and OM.
Rumination Time and Frequency of Goat Supplemented with Garlic Powder and Organic Chromium Munasik, Munasik; Bahrun, Bahrun; Sigar, Ihsan Yosinanda; Setyaningrum, Agustinah; Prayitno, Caribu Hadi
ANIMAL PRODUCTION Vol 21, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Faculty of Animal Science, Purwokerto-Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (375.928 KB) | DOI: 10.20884/1.jap.2019.21.2.763

Abstract

This research investigated the effect of supplementing garlic powder and organic micromineral Cr in feed on rumination time and frequency in Ettawah goat (PE). The research was conducted in Gunung Tugel Farm in Patikraja and the Laboratory of Feed Technology in Faculty of Animal Science, Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Purwokerto, Central Java. This study used 18 male PE aged 1-1.5 years and weighed 18.62 – 22.69 kg. The feed consisted of 60% concentrate and 40% forage (field grass). Other materials included drinking water, 250 ppm garlic powder (Allium sativum), 1.5 ppm organic chromium mineral and eight CCTV camera. The observed parameters were rumination time and frequency. An in vivo experiment in a Completely Randomised Design (CRD) administered three treatments and six replicates, namely R0: control (basal feed); R1: basal feed + 250 ppm garlic powder; and R2: basal feed + 250 ppm garlic powder + 1.5 ppm organic Cr. The result demonstrated a significantly different effect of garlic powder and organic Cr micromineral supplement on rumination time across treatments, i.e. 404 ± 19.6; 382 ± 19.04 and 351 ± 13.87 min/day, respectively, or 379 min/day on average. Rumination frequency was not significantly different across R0, R1, and R2 namely 360 ± 24.03; 359 ± 30.13 and 342 ± 21.10 times/day, respectively. Conclusively, garlic powder and organic Cr micromineral significantly affected rumination time, but not significantly affected rumination frequency of PE goat.

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